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May 05, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-05-05

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SUNDAY, MAY 5, 1946

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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Publication in the Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to al mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the Assistant to the President,
1021 Angell Hall, by 3:30 p.m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a.m. Sat-
urdays).
SUNDAY, MAY 5, 1946
VOL. LVI, No. 132
Notices
Members of the Faculty-College of
Literature, Science, and the Arts:
The May meeting of the Faculty
of the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts for the academic year
1945-46 will be held Monday, May 6,
at 4:10 p.m., in Room 1025 Angell
Hall.
The reports of the various commit-
tees have been prepared in advance
and are included with this call to thc
meeting. They should be retained in
your files as part of the minutes of
the May meeting.
Hayward Keniston
AGENDA
1. Consideration of the minutes of
the meeting of April 1, 1946 (p. 1258).
Car Production
Future Worse
Than Expected
DETROIT, May 4-0P)-The back-
log of new passenger car demand
may have been over-estimated, as
suggested in some quarters this week,
but it appears certain today that the
time when a new vehicle can be
bought "on the spot" still is many
months away.
The car builders, trying to get back
into pre-war production levels, are
running into new obstacles daily.
Their own labor troubles apparently
settled at least temporarily, they find
shortages pyramiding and their out-
put schedules shot full of holes.
It was 10 months ago this week
that the industry was authorized to
resume production for civilian use.
In the intervening period the factor-
ies, with strikes and shortages com-
mencing almost with the reopening
of the assemblies lines, have turned
out less than eight weeks' normal
output.
The manufacturers had scheduled
close to 2,000,000 cars by now, with
an April level of 500,000. Operations
are proceeding at about half that
rate and dwindling stocks of steel
threaten a further curtailment, if not
complete suspension of car assemb-
lies.
Many, if not all of the car manu-
facturers believe current dislocations
will level off by the year's end, but
none will venture a prediction con-
cerning next year's production poten-
tialities.

2. Consideration of reports sub-
mitted with the call to this meeting.
a. Executive Committee-Profes-
sor D. L. Dumond.
b. University Council-Professor
sor F. B. Wahr. No report.
c. Executive Board of the Gradu-
ate School - Professor R. L.
Wilder.
d. Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs, Professor
C. D. Thorpe.
e. Deans' Conference - Dean
Hayward Keniston.
3. Committee on Curriculum.
4. New business and announce-
ments.
Seniors in Mechanical and Aero-
nautical Engineering: A represent-
ative of Ranger Aircraft Engines
will interview Mechanical and Aero-
nautical June and August 1946 grad-
uates on Tuesday, May 7, in Room
218 West Engineering Building. If
interested, sign interview schedule on
bulletin board at Room 221 West
Engineering Bui'lding.
State Highway Commisioner Zieg-
ler, or a representative from his office,
will address a meeting .of Civil Engi-
neering students interested in high-
way work in Room 311, West Engin-
eering.Building at 4:00 on Tuesday,
May 7.
Notice to Sophomore and Senior
Students taking the Profile Examina-
tions: You will be excused from
classes where there is a conflict with
the examinations. Present to your
instructor my communication re-
garding the test as proof of your
eligibility.
Hayward Keniston, Dean
Court Softball teams are being
organized at Willow Village. Anyone
interested see Mr. Brose, Recreational
Director, Simmonds School, Phone
423, Ypsilanti.
Willow VillageProgram for the
week May 5-12 for veterans and their
wives:
Sunday, May 5: Classical Music
(records). 3-5 p.m., Office, West
Lodge.
Sunday, May 5: Movies and Lec-
ture. "Life in the Antarctic," present-
ed by Professor Allen F. Sherzer, 7:30
p.m., Auditorium, West Lodge.
Monday, May 6: Child Care Clas-
ses: Pre-natal, 2 p.m.; Care of the
(Continued on Page 4)

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ANN HAVILAND'S "Carnation"
Like a fresh bouquet . .. the pungent,
spicy fragrance of full-blown carnations
in perfume . . . 3.50 to 11.50; toilet water
... 1.50 to 4.75; body powder . . . 5.00;
talc . . . 2.50; sachets .. . 2.50 and 4.50.
(Prices plus taxes.)

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1)0 o%$1L:a oCIettiLO1L" - $.1
- e bi i e t vi t ni IC e ~

vnDiamonds (
and
Wedding j
858 RINGS
- 717 North University Ave.
D"X ) -(= ro< >oemoto

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BY
A 'UDNUT SALON CONSULTANT
All week in our Toilet Goods Section
. . . a representative of the Richard
Hudnut Salon, Fifth Avenue . . . to
give you personal advice on problems
of skin care and make-up.
A FREE S
MAKE-UP LESSONk
With your purchase of any DuBarry
Beauty Preparation this week, you
will be given a complimentary lesson
in fashion make-up, including a per.
sonal color analysis.

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HANDBAGS in fabrics and leathers
HAfor dress and all-occasion use.
Dark and light colors . * .3.95 to
32.50. (Plus taxes.)
sGLOVES. In classic pull-on styles,
some with stitching trim. Fabrics and.
leathers. White chamois ,yellow, navy,,,
NECKWEAR Welcome
refreshment for suits or
u. .. dresses. Vestees, collar andrW
cuff sets in pretty white
cottons and rayons ... 1.25
to 5.00.
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HANKIES Their dainty elegance
always welcome! Sheer whites
with lace or embroidery trim tes-
colorful flower-garden prints .'"
30c to 3.00.
COMPACTS In good-to-see-again
metals. A variety of styles by fa-}
mous makers in gold or silver-
finished metals . , . also pastel
plastics . . . 2.50 to 3.50. (Plus
taxes.)

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Famous Fifth Avenue Salon
where six floors and asports
roof are devoted to beauty.

PEARL NECKLACES Lustrous
and beautiful with everything!
Single and multiple strand
styles in choker and long
lengths . . . 1.00 to 20.00. (Plus
taxes.)
COSTUME JEWELRY Pins,
bracelets and earrings in gold
or silver-finished metal, some
sict with colored stones . . . 1.00
to 10.00.
SCARVES Flower-bright prints,
novelties and solid colors in a
variety of rayon fabrics . .. 2.25
to 7.95.

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