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April 26, 1946 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICIHIGAN DAILY PAGE 8EVEN
li

Convocation To Honor Students
(Continued from Page 6)
DUPONT POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP
Beth Elaine Cook, B.S.(Chemn.), M.S.Chem., +BK, 'l KI, AAA
SE.I. DUPONT FELLOWSHIP
William Resnick, B.S.Ch.E., M.S., 4KP
ETHYL GASOLINE FELLOWSHIP
Olin Carroll Karkalits, B.S.Ch.E., M.S., +AT, Z
EDWIN C. HINSDALE SCHOLARSHIPS

harol Eugene Broadbooks, A.B.,
A.M.
Alice Marion Hall, B.S.Ed.
11arriet Clara Jameson, A.B.,
A.M., P'h.D., A.BL.S., +K(P

,IJ3RARY SERVICE FEILLOWSIIPLIS
Ann Elizabeth Johnson, A.B.,
I3.L.S.

Side >lajirv, A.BL, A. M
Hilda Winifred Marsh, AR,
AB.L. S.

MONSANTO CHEM:ICAL WORKS RE.SEARCH FELLOWSHIPS
Floyd E. Anderson, B.S.
MICHIGAN GAS ASSOCIATION FELLOWSHIP IN GAS ENGINEERING
William Walter Akers, B.S.Ch.E., George Geist Binder, r

Andre Samuel Dreiding, B.S.,

WILLIAM S. MERRELIL FELLOWSII1P
IHung-yun Kuo, Grad., Tsing Hua Donald Guy Sheets, ..13, AT
University; M.S.

F. C. AND SUSAN EASTMAN NEWCOMBE FELLOWSHIP IN PLANT HIIIYSIOLOGY
Jose da Cruz Paixao, Agron.Eng., Cheng Tsui, B.S., A.M., <i'
M.S., 2
PARKE, DAVIS AND COMPANY FELLOWSIIIPS
Martin Chanin, A.B., M.S., Richard Armitage Mock, B.S.,
(PAT M.S., <A T

MARGARET KRAUS RAMSDELL FELLOWSHIP
Nathan Alexander Scott, Jr., A.B., B.D.
SCHOEN-RENE FELLOWSHIPS

SO THERE!
Brawnier; Girls
Are Brainier
By EUNICE MINTZ
"It is very displeasing to me when
the hen speaks and the cock is sil-
ent."
Poor Roman de la Rose, the man
who penned this statement, would
probably be quite disconcerted if he
could see how the hens on this cam-
pus have scholastically outdone theI
cocks. For a survey taken of the
grades awarded in the University
from 1940 through 1945 indicates
that each year the girls have received
higher marks than their antagoiists
from the sti :nger scx.
The 1940-41 scholastic chart
shows that the combined averages
of all women in the non-profes-
sional schools was 2.57. For men,
the average was 2.50.
In 1941-42 the en toto average for
the weaker sex was 2.59. The men s1
average was 2.53. In 1942-43, the wo-
men earned an over-all average of
2.61. The men trailed them with an
average of 2.49. In 1943-44, the girl's
average was 2.60; the men's 2.50. Last
year the girls came through with a
2.61 average. The men had 2.52.
Broken down these figures show
that in 1940-41, the independent
and sorority women had exactly
the saBie ave age, 2.59, while inde-
pendent men outdid their brethren
in fraternities 2.53 to 2.49.
The following year the independent
girls outstripped the Greek letter
girls, the former gaining an average
of 2.62 and the latter 2.57. Indepen-
dent men stuck with the sorority girls
scholastically, while men in frater-
nities made an even 2.50.
In 1942-43 the race between af-
filiated and independent women
was very close. The sorority girls
came out with a 2.61 and the As-
sembly members with a 2.62. Inde-
pendent men outstripped their fra-
ternity members 2.54 to 2.42.
In 1943-44 the Greek letter girls
had their revenge, gaining a 2.60 com-
pared to the independent girls 2.59.
Greek letter men also gained revenge
when they emerged with a 2.51
against the independent men's 2.49.
The sorority girls kept it up last
year, beating out the independent
women 2.64 to 2.59. But the unaf-
filiated men beat the Greek letter
boys 2.54 to 2.46.
It might placate Mr. de la Rose to
know, however, that the cock will
speak louder today, for more men
than women are being honored at
Honors Convocation.

PRESIDENT WATCHES FROM CARRIER BRIDGE . .. His cap pulled
down tight and his heavy leather coat flapping, President Truman stands
on the breezy open bridge of the big carrier Franklin D. Roosevelt to
study a maneuver in the 8th Feet battle exercises off the Virginia Capes.
MURRAY SPECULA TES:
Union's Southern Campaign
May EiminteoB*lo, ankin.

Chinese Offer
Scholarships
For Veterans
Fund Is Established
To Aid Understanding
By MARY BRUSH
Scholarships now being offered by
the Chinese government to American
GI's are part of a pro gram "based on
the belief that by developing cultural
relations you can go very deep in pro-
moting international understanding."
Dr. Chih Meng, director of the China
Institute in New York, said here yes-
terday.
Ten grants of $1,500 a year will be
awarded to American veterans who
have served in the China Theatre and
are now attending, or plan to attend,
universities in this country. The
scholarships may be used at any col-
lege in the United States or China, for
the study of Chinese history and cul-
ture, Dr. Meng said.
Effective in Fall
The grants will go into effect in the
fall, he reported, but due to destruc-
tion of Chinese universities during
the war, students will be advised to
study in America for the first year.
Deadline for applications is May 31.
At present, Dr. Meng pointed out,
the number of American students in
China, or who know the Chinese lan-
guage, is only a "drop in the bucket"
compared to Chinese students here.
Superficial Understanding
"The so-called international un-
derstanding between the two wars
was too superficial," Dr. Meng said,
declaring that "this is a very funda-
mental way of attacking the prob-
lem."
Another project being planned by
the China Institute to cement rela-
tions between the two countries is a
vacation trip to China for American
students and teachers. "It takes more
money for Chinese students to come
here than it does for you to go there,"
Dr. Meng pointed out.
Further information concerning
the scholarships, as well as the pro-
posed China tour, may be obtained
by writing the China Institute, 125 E.
65th St., New York 21.
Michigan State
Bys Dwellings
EAST LANSING, April 25-(.P)-
Michigan State College has purchased
50 temporary emergency dwellings as
living quarters for faculty members
who are unable to locate homes in
East Lansing.
The buildings-some of them pre-
fabricated and others of the Quonset
type-will be set up on a site near the
present 52 Quonset huts housing stu-
dent veterans at the college.

Stephene Lyon Be~ckwithI, B .S.,
Mi. C'

j ames C reg g Ruxx ury, Jr., B S

FREDERICK STEARNS AND COMPANY FELLOWSHIPS
J oliI ans Biel, 1Al., M.S., Frederick Leonard,. B.S., MS.,
SChOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
James Vincent Ilalligan, B.S.F. Charles Dudley Mattson, BS.F. Robert Evelyn Mullin, I3.S.F.
David Vaughan Love, B.S.F. Kai Wang, B.S.

Loren E. Cady, B.S.M., IlKA
Howard Randolph Chase,
B.Mus.(Theory),
M.Mus.(Theory), PKP
Daniel Bergsma, A.B., M.l).
Antonio Campos-Salas, M.)., M2
Mary Louise Cline, B.S., M.S.
Ernesto Gonzalez-Salas, M.D.,
Emnimarie Carlson Hemphill, B.A.,
AQ

SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Vincent IeMatteis, BS.Ed.,
IIKA
Jeannette Haien, B.Mus.(Piano),
PBK, <K(I
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
George Edgar Hobbs, B.A., M.D.,
AQ, PK4b
Elizabeth Ann McMahon, A.B.,
<bK
Joseph A. Moore, M.D., ASS

Ruby Joan Kuhbbmain,
B.Mus.(Piano), IIKtA, +1K,
4'K+
Marian A. Owen, B.S.M.
Mary Jane Wardwell, B.M.,
IIKA
Marion Isabel Murphy, B.S.,
AU, +K(1P
Sydney Stanley Norwick, B.S.,
M.D., <PKP4
Bhanu K. Parikh, 3.A.
Henry F. Vaughan, Jr., B.A.,
L1<., <rK

By 'The Associated iPress
ATLANTIC CITY. N. J., April 25-
CIO President Philip Murray said to-
day a possible result of the CIO's or-
ganizing drive in the South might be
the elimination from public life of
Sen. Bilbo (Dem., Miss.) and Rep.-
Rankin (Dem., Miss.).
Speaking to 1,200 delegates at the
CIO Textile Workers Union conven-
tion, Murray said the organizing
campaign "would be a simple, pure
unadulterated campaign of trade un-
icn organization to improve condi-
tions of employment, to increase
wages and to bring about conditions
that will be socially better for the
people living in the South."
"If in the course of the next few
years the by-product of that sort of
Weaver To Talk On
Work Witih Lepers
Mrs. Eunice Weaver, President of
the Federation of Societies for As-
sistance to Lepers, will deliver a lec-
ture on "Social Work in Leprosy" on
May 6 in the Rackham Amphithea-
tcr.
She is being brought to Ann Arbor
under the joint auspices of the Latin-
American Society and the Depart-
ment of Bacteriology. The public is
invited to attend the lecture.

a campaign results in a moan being
eliminated from the political picture,
such as Bilbo and Rankin, then that
is all to the good, isn't it?" he con-
tinued.
Murray indicated he expected AFL
opposition in the drive.
The CIO president also told the
convention that "there has not been
enacted by Congress since 1937 a sin-
gle little bit of forward-looking social
legislation."
Instruc'tors of
Speech To Meet
Prof. Andrew Weaver, chairman of
the Department of Speech at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, will address the
annual meeting of the Michigan As-
sociation of^ Teachers of Speech on
"speech Training in a Democracy"
today at the First Methodist Church.
Prof. Weaver is a past president of
the National Association of Teachers
of Speech, and past editor of the
"Quarterly Journal of Speech."
After the annual business meeting,
there will be sectional meetings from
2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Union. The
sectional meetings will be on public
speaking, speech correction, drama
and interpretation, and elementary
speech education.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

for voting the

CHEBTERFIELBDSUPPER C LUD
their Favorite 15-minute Program for

(Continued from Page 4)
Events Today
The Art Cinema League and Mu
Phi Epsilon present "LIFE OF
BEETHOVEN" with Harry Baur, in
sepia print. French dialogue; English
titles tonight and Saturday evenings
at 8:30. Box office opens 2:00 p.m.,
daily. Phone 6300 reservations. Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
"The Music and Dramatic Depart-
ments of the University High School
present "The Chocolate Soldier," an
operetta in three acts, to be given
in the high school auditorium at 8:30
tonight and Saturday evenings. Tick-
ets are on sale in the office of the
University High School.
}The Agell Hall Observatory will
be open to visitors tonight at 8:00
to 10:00 p.m., if the sky is clear, to
observe Jupiter and Saturn. Children
must be accompanied by adults.
If the sky is cloudy or nearly
cloudy, the Observatory will not be
open.
Coffee Ilour: Lane Hall will hold
the weekly Coffee Hour at 4:30 today.
Supper tonight at 6:00, and social
evening for married Lutheran stu-
dents of the Synodical Conference at
the Student Center, 1511 Washtenaw.
Coning Ivery Is
The Annual French Play: Le Ccmr-
cle Francais will present "Les
Femmes Savantes," a comedy in five
acts and in verse by Moliere, on Wed-
! nesday, May 1. at 8:30 p.m. in the
Lydia Mendissohn Theater. All seats
are reserved. Tickets will be on sale
at the box office on Monday, Alrril
29; Tuesday, April 30, from 2:00-5:00
p.m.; Wednesday, May 1, from 2:00-
8:30 p.m. Call 6300 for reservations.
Members of Le Cercle Francais will
pay the federal tax only.
The Graduate Outing Club is plan-
ning a hike for Sunday, April 28. If
the weather is suitable they may go

the Union. All students on campus
are invited.
The All Nations Club is holding a
Record Dance at Rackham on Satur-
day, from 8:30-12:30 p.m.
Wesleyan Guild will have a Hay-
ride Friday night. For reservations
call 6881 before Friday noon. Meet
in the lounge at 8:30 and we shall
ret urn about 10:30 for refreshments
and dancing.
The Lutheran Student Association
will have a party at the Y.M.C.A. Sat-
urday evening. Those planning to
attend should bring gym and swim-
ming equipment and meet at the As-
sciation Center, 1304 Hill Street, at
7:45.
The regular Sunday meeting of the
ESA will be held in Zion Lutheran
Parish Hall at 5:30. Election of offi-
cers will take place. The program will
be a panel discussion on "What LSA
Meant To Me While In The Service
And What It Can Mean To Me Now."
Sunday morning Bible Hour will be

SEVEN REASONS
TO STOP AND SHOP
1. Ideally located for Veterans of Willow Run
2. Large parking space
3. Choice meats - plenty of pork, beef, and bacon.
4. Fresh fruits and vegetables
5. Groceries
6. Ice cream and soft drinks
7. Newspapers and magazines
We remain open: Sunday 10 a.m. -6 p.m., Daily 10 a.m.- p.m.
ee £hea4 £pten fHarke
1431 L~ Michigan -- on the Corner of Harris Rd. and'#
Michigan Ave., Ypsilanti

y

the second time in less than 15 months
in the Billboard 15th Annual Poll.

f
R

17MV

at the usual time, 9:15, at the Center. 1
We are s9 re-rodeling
H8
I but wi I be open
,
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
H this SATURDAY
fron 9:3QA.M.to6:OOP.M.

A

0o~\4L x

opy right 1946. LloEvr do Mns ToBaco Co.

,I

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