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April 20, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, APRIL 20, 1940

THE MTC mc. AN nxiT: v

V APIV t vlir

1T-11 ".,L'1T1 1N41111 T7'tl A11 jWy fl jVyYj

i' itil; 'i't1lCLG

Block's Sparklincv

Tw4litie~r Thips

Wayne, -11-

DES SEZ
iNew Average Systeii
S ,Earl Block, Pitcher
By DES riOWA RT, Asv.oiate Sporty Editor

Seven Tartar Misplays
,Aid Wolverine Victory
11jaj' Ui itsT 'Pace heiigan Nin. Al Iite
By WALT KIbLE
)e"( hild(Ale brilliant two-hit hurling of Earl Block, the Michigan base-
ball team won its 21st consecutive ball game when it downed the Wayne
University nine yesterday by an 11-1 score at Ferry Field.
The Wolverines, playing with a makeshift line-up caused by injuries
to key men, took advantage of every break that came their way in winning
their season opener with ease.
Block in his first appearance on the mound for the Wolverines displayed
excellent form as he allowed only two 't--_

-FOR many years the system of de-
termining batting averages in the
major leagues has been the object of
much adverse eriticism by leading
baseball critics, players and fans
alike. Admittedly the system now in
use could stand much revising. How-
ever, like the weather, much is said
about the subject but little is done.
To show how unfair the system is
one need only take a look at last
year's final averages in the Ameri-
can League. George "Snuffy"
Stirnweiss won the circuit's batting
crown on the last day of the season,
and then only by the narrowest of
margins. Runner-up was Tony
Cuccinello of the White Sox. Ap-
parently the two should be placed
on an equal rating, but such is not
the case. Stirnweiss is the far su-
perior ball player, and Cuccinello,
despite his showing of last season,
is no longer in the major leagues.
T HE answer lies in the fact that
Tony was not the ball player his
average indicated. Most of his hits
were singles; he drove in few runs.
Stirnweiss' record in the runs batted
in column was hardly impressive
either, but his value to the Yankees
far exceeded Cuccinello's to Chicago.
Managers are not impressed by a
player's average necessarily but
not only to get on base but also to
evaluation-that being the ability
not only to get on base but alsa to
come. through with a hit when
there are men on base. True, lead-
off batters and those following
weak hitters are not given the
chance to pile up big totals in the
RBI column, but on the other hand
a ball player is not worth much if
he continually leaves runners
stranded on the bases regardless of
his batting average otherwise.
IT IS with these inconsistencies in
mind that we have devised a new
system to give a true indication of the
batter's effectiveness. We believe it
is fool proof. In formulating this
system three things are taken into
account: the batsman's ability to get
on base, his ability to drive in runs,
and his ability to connect for long
hits.
This system does not take into
account slugging percentages.
Rather it includes times at bat,
number of hits, number of men on
base, and number of runs driven in.
Let us assume for instance that
Bob Nussbaumer has the following
record:
AB ROB II RBI Ave.
58 38 12 27 .406
This we obtain by adding the num-
ber of times at bat and the number
of men on the base and divide it
into the total of hits and runs bat-
ted in. Thus Nussbaumer, wtho
would be batting only .207 under
the present system, would boost his
average .199 points because of bat-
ting in the 27 runs for a RBI per-
centage of .711.
THIS gives Nussbaumer a higher
average than let us say Elmer
Swanson whose record might be as
follows:
AB ROB H RBI Ave.
43 28 16 1 .225
Swanson would be batting at a .372
clip under the system now in use,
would not really be as valuable as
Nussbaumer since his percentage of
runs driven in would be only .036:
A player who doesn't have many
ATTENTION: BOWLERS!
Watch this space for the announce-
ment of the prize headpin tourna-
ment to be held soon at the WIL-
LOW RUN BOWLING ALLEYS.

opportunities to bat in runs would
not be penalized by this new system.
For instance Don Robinson might
have:
AB ROB II RBI Ave.
22 1 11 3 .609
Robinson would be batting .500 with
11 hits in 22 trips to the plate. He
had only one chance to drive in a
run and succeeded. The other two
runs batted in would be as a result
of two home runs without anyone on
base.
A final advantage to the system is
that the long ball hitter who scores
runners from first or second is also
compensated more than the batter
who only advances the runners.
EARL BLOCK certainly lived up to
advance notices as he gave one of
the prettiest exhibitions of twirling
down at Ferry Field yesterday that
we have seen in many a year of
watching the Wolverine nines in ac-
tion. In the score books Block will
be officially credited with a two-hit-
ter, but both were definitely of the
scratch variety. One was a slow roller
that just got by the big right-hander.
The other came as a result of Dom
Tomasi falling down in the seventh
inning. Incidentally that play caused
much discussion as to whether Dom
should be charged with one of those
Ilnavoidable errors.
ilock's complete mastery of the
Wayne crew was evident in the first
inning when he poured through
eight straight strikes. In fact he
only pitched one ball all inning.
Then after fanning three men in
the first he got the next batter on
three pitches in the second.
Only two balls were hit to the
Michigan outfield, one of them just
back on the grass. The one lone tally
which the Tartars did score of the
ace Wolverine hurler was unearned.
Not a bad show for Block's initial
performance.
Trounces
.W t cf t i. i'i, 1 1 3
EAST LANSING, April 19-(P)
Michigan State College opened its
regular baseball season here today by
smearing the University of Wiscon-
sin nine with a 15-hit attack for a
11-3 victory.
Joe Skrocki, MSC's leading hurler
before the war, was credited with the
win, his fourth of the season. Skrocki
won three games on the Spartans' re-
cent *southern tour which produced
nine victories. He scattered 10 Badger
hits and was never in hot water.
The Spartans pounded Gene Jar-1
och, Wisconsin's leading pitcher, for
13 hits and 10 runs before he left the
game in the seventh for a pinch hit-
ter. Not only was Jaroch ineffective
cn the mound but his supporting
cast fell down, committing five er-
rors.
Second baseman Bob Groves andl
third baseman Dick Mineweaser,
both of whom were elevated to start-
ing berths only yesterday, led State'st
hitting. Mineweaser's triple in theY
second inning drove in the Spartans'
first two runs and his single in the1
third was one of six hits which pro-t
duced four scores. Groves collectedt
a triple in the fourth and a single in
the third which drove in two runs.

I'

infield hits, struck out 12, and allow-
ed only two balls out of the infield.
Wolverines Get 11 Free Passes
Mea nwl lesthe Wolverines were
jumping on six Tartar pitchers who
gave up eleven bases on balls and
seven hits. Seven errors helped the
Wolverines to all but six of their tal-
lies.
Bob Chappuis was the big gun of,
the Wolverine offense as he banged'
out a triple and a double in four times
at bat. The triple was a long line

baseman. Rosema scored the first
run when Bill Collins dropped a throw
from Urdea which would have been
a force-out.
Block came through with a double
to center for two more runs. A walk
to Houser and Bliss Bowman's fly to
right ended the inning without fur-
ther scoring.
Two more runs camve across in the
following inning on a walk to Rosema
and Chappuis' triple and Tomasi's
double. Two walks, three errors and

|G oilers IeI
Season A ainst
MS( Ioda
- by GiAl.UA VItIELAINII
lVirliiganu t'olil-rs wm il lay their
(openlinJ ' n [:: m1,8I l atWOson when
they tee o l agains' the ) MiV igai
State linksnen at 2 p.m. this after-
noon at the University Golf Course.
Chosen by Coach Bill Barclay to
represent the Wolverines are Dave
Barclay, Dune Noble, Pete Elliot, Bill
Ramsey, Ed Schalon, and Roger Kes-
sler in that order. All six men have
shown they ar capable of shooting
consistently in ti(e 70's.
Dave Barclay hosi o cl- Fo First Spt
A depeldĀ«;ble , ll roundU golfer who
has had c osid, a wle oornament ex-
per'iencde, and, in t i t words of his
coach, "knows all Ish ots,' Bar-
clay further esta1 h li inself in
the niumber one spot on the squad
last week when he carded a neat 75
in a practice round. Elliot has been
playing a brand of golf which would
challenge Barclay's claim as the
i team's Number 1 in'n if it weren't for
his erratic putting.
The remainder of the men have'
been placed in the above order chiefly
on the basis of experience. Noble, a
letter winner on ihe 1944 squad, is
the only playe whlo ias faced college
competition. in iey made favor-
afav - s a 1 Ioui nam en ts
in the ut.1 a wIic a leni bcr of the
Army Ai,, C,1 .<<mrn dlKessler,
Both vo-unh freshml i. mave ad the
least operiom wvi the Pormer
111 " Plmtii liii Wot
.1s mt lu nston la~' Sadas
'Fhi :Shan's hall wil IM 5lmtkedI
by Jimi P 01151on, u alfer whio has
piay( t a hot iinto rom nt:; around
Detroit ad w ha Ia.; beIi capabl of
shoating as low as 72 n in mid-
season form. le is ihe only letter-
man on the squa d. In number two

fy BILL MATNEV
MiChigun's 1thinelads will conelu td
the ino ;t imiportant week of ottdour
training of the season today with Ohe
ruining of time trials designed to
determine the final personnel of re-
lay teams representing the school at
the Penn Relays April 26 and 27.
Despite the fact that the weather
has not been ideal for outdoor prac-
tice, several middle distance men
have turned in favorable times in the
quarter mile, and in the shorter 350-
yd. sprint. Horace Coleman, Val
Johnson and Bill Haidler were clocked
in :50.7 on Wednesday and Hugh
Short ran through an easy :38 second
350. Both marks are good consider-
ing the high wind that whips down
the Ferry Field track and batters the
oncoming runners.
Mile Relay Remains Intact
Coach Ken Doherty is not certain
of the make-up of the mile relay
team but he has stated that there
have been no other prospects to com-
pile better times than the above
foursome in the 440. Ron Soble, re-
turning after a short absence, is
rounding into form slowly, and should
press the quartet for a place on the
team at a later date.
The balance of the two mile relay
team is still another question mark
confronting Doherty. Ilerb Barten,
Conference Indoor half-mile titlist,

Wolverine Trackmen Vie
For Penn Relays Berths

a; :oisurud of one Position, as well as
liob13 'Fl i ;[l n, but three mIIen will
vie for the other two remaining slots.
at ys trials will select the new
ilemnbers from Culnck Low, Joe Shea,
and John Ingersoll, a veteran of the
1943 Wolverine squad.
Illinois Strong Again
Another duel with the Illinois mile
relay team appears imminent as Leo
Johnson announced this week that he
is sending a six man team to the Penn
Relays. Somewhat perturbed over the
loss of Bill Buster, lead-off man for
the team, Johnson hopes to plug the
gap with either George Walker, out-
door 100, high and low hurdle cham-
pion, or Dwight Eddleman, who will
also compete in the high jump. John-
son says that Walker has stepped off
a :51.1 quarter in practice, and pos-
es ses the stamina and legs necessary
for the distance. Eddleman's endur-
ance is as yet untested. One of these
men will join the excellent trio of
Bob Rehberg, Marce Gonzales, apd
Herb McKenley. They are expeceed
to threaten the Relay's record.
Michigan's weight men, Chuck
Fcnville and George Ostroot, are
heaving the shot and slinging the
Rosema 3, Kell2, Chappuis 2, Toma-
the stiff opposition timat will be fur-
nished by Eastern schools, particu-
larly-New York University.

Major LCeague Standinos

AMEI.CAN LEAGUE

NATUIONtAL , EA(;IJlE

WALT KELL . . . The Wolverine's switch hitting third baseman, who
laid down a perfect bunt single, drew three walks, and played flawless
ball afield in yesterday's victorious opener with Wayne University.

Moston ...........
Cleveland.
New York........
Detroit.....
St. Louis.........
Philadelphia ....
Chicago ..........
Washington......

W
3
1
1
0

it
0
1
1
2
2
S2

Pet.
1.000
1.000
.750
.667
.333
.333
.000
.000

I ,
1
2
2
212
v r/

Chicago ..........
New York.
Brooklyn.........
St. Louis........
Boston ...........
Pittsburgh.
Philadelphia.
Cincinnati.

W L
2 1
2. 1
2 1

Pet.
1.0001
.667
.667
.667
.550
.333
.000
.000

Gi
1
1
1
2
2v
3

drive into left field within ten feet
of the foul line while the double was
along the opposite foul line.
The Wolverines gave a passable ex-
hibition afield, committing but two
errors. The whole Michigan infield
gave the 500 odd fans who braved the
chilly afternon a more than credit-
able i;erformance while Ralph Hous-
er, playing in centerfield, made twol
nice running catches in what is al
strange position to him.
Wayne's Double Steal Fails
Walt Kell batting in the leadoff
slot bunted safely in the first frame,
worked the opposing hurlers for three
passes, hit a line drive at the first
baseman and was robbed of a single
by Don Torres' diving catch in right
field in the ninth.
.For the first four innings the game
looked as if the two teams were even-
ly matched. Block struck out the side
in the first and two men in the second
while Don Brown, the first Wayne
pitcher, allowed but two Wolverines
to reach first.
Bill Fagenson, Tartar first sacker,
hit a single off Block's glove to lead
off the third. He was sacrificed to
second and moved to third on an
infield out. Then with a man on first
Wayne tried a double steal. Elmer
Swanson faked the ball and threw
to Kell who placed the ball on Fa-
genson who was out by three yards.
Michigan Scores Three Runs
The Wolverines came through with
three runs on a single hit and three
misplays in their half of the fourth.
Tom Rosema led off with a walk and
reached second as Chappius reached
first when Brown dropped Fagenson's
throw on an attempted bunt. Dom
Tomasi reached first on the first of
four errors by Myron Urdea, third
College Baseball
At Champaign, Ill., Illinois 7,
Chicago 1 (Big Ten Conference)
At Ames, Iowa, Iowa State 12,
Minnesdta 1
At Iowa City, Iowa, Purdue 3,
Iowa 6
Pitchers Today
NATIONAL LEAGUE
New York at Brooklyn---Voiselle
(14-14) or Koslo (0-0) vs Higbe (0-0).
Boston at Philadelphia-Lee (9-9)
vs Raffensberger (0-3)
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh-Walters
10-10) vs.Roe (14-13)
St. Louis at Chicago-Brecheen
(15-4) vs Borowy (21-7)
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Chicago at St. Louis--Lopat (10-
13) vs Miller (2-1)
Detroit at Cleveland-Trout (18-
5) vs Gromek (19-9)
Washington at New York-Leon-
ard (17-7) vs Marshall (0-0)
Philadelphia at Boston - Fowler
1-2) vs Hughson (0-0)
Hold Your Bonds

spot will be Dale (ittmroar, who playec
a bunt single produced two more on the Ann Arbor Higi team with
tallies in the sixth. Kessler.
Wise, Bowman To Pitch Today The two ,:Tv ; I;'ksmen pla3
Chappuis batted in three more runs about the an me gan, and if thai
in the seventh inning with a double voiild be ,nY i aliAn ol the out-
after Block had been forced in with, come of dhvs :Icts says Coach
the first run of the inning when Rose Barclay, c-, i toi 1 - is scc-
sema received his third walk of the and spot (.1n Ii :;I 0I 10 arnd K e'Ir iU
game with the bases loaded. The Wol- (Mi1telding n i 11,' I nIIher >ix pnosi-
verines seemed content with their tion would ' wi' I 1o! Wolerines ar
margin from then on .out and the' edge.
final score was 11-1. Score Char'tL, To lr; Posted
Coach Ray Fisher plans to us ThIe shiles and <lot bs matches
Cliff Wise and Bowman in the re- will be rn oil at Li sme time, that
turn contest between the two teams is each Pv er In tI bu .'mme will
this afternoon at Northwestern Field match his c am.I withii h at of his op-
in Detroit. ponent andtlie plrtners will use
these same scores to iat(ch against
WAYNE A iIl P0 A E the scores of lir (pPOSiig partners.
Rezepka, J., 21 2 0 1 3 0 Students are wilcoim to attend
Sesko, ss 3 0 3 0 0 the miatshe, :'isn i free and a
Urdea, 3b 2 0 1 2 4 s:ore chart. will be pot'd in the club
Nuebacher, 3b 0 0 0 1 0 house with an up to lhe minute ac-
Collins, c 3 0 4 1 2 count of the progress ol eachm atch.
Cravens,a 0 0 0 0 0

i
:1
,
f
k
k
i
.]
r

1
.1
0
0

1
2
2

FRIDAY'S RESULTS
New York 7, Washington 6.
SATURDAY'S GAMES
Chicago at St. Louis
Philadelphia at Boston
Detroit at Cleveland
Washington at New York

FRIDAY'S RESULT'S
NO GAMES SCHEDULED
SATURDAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Chicago
New York at Brooklyn
Boston at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh

Art Valpey, a member of the
football coaching staff, will show
films of the Michigan-Great Lakes
football game at West Lodge, Wil-
low Village at 7:30 p.m. Sunday,

Biay Faster Seals.

Kunka, cf
Torres, rf .
Fagenson, lb
Chapman, If
Rabinowitz, if
Brown, p
Ross*
Anschuttz, p
Rzepka, I., p
Salvatore, p
Hudie, p
Kolad,

4
4
3
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
24

0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

1
4
9
1
1
0
0
0
0
0'
0
0
24

*Batted for Brown in fourth
**Batted for Hudie in ninth

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HANDBILLS, ETC.
Downtown: 308 NORTH MAINĀ«
ATHENS PRESS

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1
a
(

MICHIGAN
Kell, 3b
Houser, cf
Bowman, If
Rosema, lb
Chappuis, rf
Tomasi, 2b
Brown, ss
Swanson, c
Raymond, c
Block, p

AR H PO
3 1 1
2 0 2
3 1 0
1 0 8
4 2 0
311
5- 1 12
0 0 0
000 0108000,
000 322 40

A E
1 0
0 0
0 0
1 1
0 0.
3 0
2 1
1 0
0 0
20
10 2

YaInks Nip Senators
In Ninth bling, 7-6
NEW YORK, April 19-P)--John
Lindell, a former pitcher who is a
sub outfielder with the New York
Yanks, lofted a towering fly to center
field in the last of the ninth today
and scored Tommy Henrich with the
winning run as the Yanks defeated
Washington, 7 to 6, in Gotham's
opening American Loague game
which lured 54,826 fans.
Trailing 6-5 in their last turn at
bat, and with ancient Johnny Nig-
geling, the Senators' fifth hurler on
the slab, the Yankees quickly put two
men on base. George Stirnweiss drew
a walk and Henrich was hit by a
pitched ball. Joe Di Maggio then
lined a double off the left field wall,
driving in Stirnweiss with the tying
run and sending Henrich to third.
Henrich then scored on Lindell's
hoist.
Washington 201 000 120-6 11 1
New York 040 001 002-7 12 1
Haefner, Masterson, Pieretti, Cur-
tis, Niggeling and Evans; Page, Kar-
pel, Roser and Dickey.

Runs: Wayne, Fagenson; Michigan,
Rosema 3, Kell 2, Chappuis, 2, Toma-
si 1, Bowman, Swanson, Block. Runs
batted in: Chappuis 4, Block 2, To-
masi 1; doubles: Chappuis, Tomasi,
Block; triples: Chappuis; Stolen
Bases: Swanson, Fanenson; Sacri-
fices: Chapman, Houser; Bases on
balls: Michigan 11, Wayne 5; Hit
by pitcher: Block; Winning pitcher:
Block; Losing Pitcher: Brown.

April 21. ~~~
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