100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 14, 1946 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Nina

Milady's Car Was Really
Smarty Silent Back in'16

'Crime Does Not Pay'; (t itasI
Not in Washtenaw County

AY 1uspected of Recruiting Reds

By The Associated Press
DETROIT, Mich., April 13-If it's
strictly glamour the little woman
yearns for, maybe she should be sat-
isfied with. a 1916 electric model car
in lieu of the virtually non-existent
1946 version.
She surely would, according to
the picture painted today by Mrs.
Lillian Reynolds Bauer, first wo-
man ever to sell ahorseless carriage.
Maybe the electric cars she sold
didn't have fluid drive and such
things, but you could get quilted
satin upholstery in almost any col-
or and slip covers to match your
favorite clothes.
In addition, these cars came with
built-in vanity cases, vases for flow-
ers, a ruder type arrangement in-
stead of a steering wheel-and you
could drive from the front or back
seat, which ever you wished.
Interviewed at a session of the
automotive industry's golden jubi-
lee committee, Mrs. Bauer explain-

ed she caused quite a furor when
she sold that first car back in 1916.
Women in business were unusual in
those days, but women in the auto-
motive "game" were unheard of.
Her father, Joseph Reynolds, gen-
eral manager of the Detroit Electric
Car Co., taught her to drive when she
was 15. Then when she was 19, he
let her come to work. Since electric
cars were sold principally to women,
the company decided maybe a wo-
man's touch would be a good idea, she
said.
"Electric cars were for ladies,"
she said, explaining that even Mrs.
Henry Ford, whose husband was
busy turning out model Ts in those
days, had an electric job.
"It wasn't ladylike to drive a
gasoline auto. With electric cars
there was no oil or dirt to shoot up
through floor boards, there was no
dust, and they were almost auto-
matic-you didn't have to know a
thing about mechanics."

If you are thinking of committing
a crime, any crime, from the most
minor larceny to a grand felony,
don't do it in Washtenaw County.
At least this is the advice of a
Daily reporter after making a care-
ful survey of the identification ser-
vices maintained by the Sheriff's
office here.
Color Pictures Are New,
"Aside from having one of the most
complete photo labs in this area,"
Vincent H. Fox, chief of the Iden-
tification Bureau, pointed out," we
are the only unit in the state doing
our own color photo work."
Explaining that color pictures are
something relatively new in crime ce-
tection, Mr. Fox gave these examples
of its invaluable aids: 1. Color photos
will indicate more definitely the na-
ture of stains on various articles. 2.
Indicate whether marks on a body
were pre-mortum or post-mortum.
3. Determine with great accuracy the
nature of alterations on papers in
forgery cases.
Every Suspect Fingerprinted
"We also maintain," Fox directed,
"a most complete file of fingerprints
and photographs." He added:
"Every suspect arrested and
brought to jail is photographed and
fingerprinted, one copy being kept
on our files, and others sent to Wash-
ington and Lansing. Through a sim-
ilar practice on the part of other
law enforcement agencies, we are able
to keep a most complete, up-to-date
record of all lawbreakers.
Special 'Mug' Files ]Kept
The file of wanted individuals at
the Sheriff's office now contains
over 9,000 listings. There is also a
Program10To1l11nor
Pan-American Day
Pan-American Day will be observ-
ed by the Latin AmericanrSociety, the
International Center and the Ameri-
can Legion with a program at 7:30
p.m. today in the Union Ballroom.

special mug file of locally wanted
individuals whch now nunbers over
3,000. This latter system is relatie
new .having been instituted in 1941.
"Fingerprintig is still the mo st
reliable and major form of indentifi-
cation," Fox stated, although palm
and foot printing has been brought
into wider use of late. Fingerprinting
was taken up on a large scale by this;
office in 134."
Editac onCls
Given tues
Students in Prof. Warren Good's
educational psychology class will pre-
sent a concert at 1:15 p.m. Tuesday
in Rm. 1002 University High School.
The program will include:
Allegro, from Symphony No..5..........
Ludwig von Beethoven
Piano duet by Arlene Peugeot and Ann
Crossley
Hai Luti ................. ..... Coguar
Le Nil............................. Leroux
vocal solos by Joanne Ling accompanied
by Arlene Peugeot
First Arabesque......... Claude Debussy
Romance, Op. 28, No. 2 .... Robert Schu-
mann
Pinao solos by Gwendolyn Allen
Adagio, from Concerto for Clarinet .....
Wolfgang Mozart
Clarinet solo by Robert Grindle accom-
panied by Arlene Peugeot
Motley, from Tunes from the
Eighteenth Century....... Harold Bauer
Lento, from Two 'Pierrot' Pieces.......
Cyril Scott
Chant d'Amour, Op. 26, No. 3..........
Sigmund Stojowsk

The Ohio Swi eLantern reports
that President Bevis of OSU has or-
den ci an invest Vgat ion of Ohio State
Youth far Demna.rary. a chapter of
Anu'an Nout foi Demn-racY for
Comunist tendlCfiS.
The order was brouht about by
an at tIcl> in Soriuns-I:ward news-
uap~ers in w~hich Fredr'ick Woliman.,
under a New Yoi k dateline, stated
that "the Conlnunist party has ad-
tittedl paternity of the American
Youth for DL ncirr' : and that its
Sgania.;ts on the cAmprises of 63
irn ,erjtic wrebeng uisd a an in-
'10 1 trur ' t r' m1lii u young
Ofic ~s>:~>OYD th aril
tad whleunable to deny the pros-
membership, denied that OSYD and
AYD are Communist sponsored or
affiliated.
. At Colby College, Vatervifle, Me.,
one instructor carrid this modern
age to a new height. In bed with a
cold, he info m d his astonished
class Ever a lodspeaker in their
classroom that he would lecture as
usual.
The Student Memorial Committee
of the University of Kansas has an-
- nounced their choice for a memorial
to the more than 8,000 KU men and
women who served in World War
' Two-a campanile with carillon, and
a scenic parkway around the outside
of the Mt. Oread campus.
r According to the Daisy Kansan, the
t
iRelef or e

campanile, which will rise 150 to 175
feet above the summit of Mt. Oread,
will be "one of the outstanding land-
narks of the state of Kansas." The
Iccnic parkway, starting from a for-
mal entrance near the Memorial
Union, will be laid, in part, over the
ruts of the old Oregon Trail. The
total sum to be raised for the whole
project will be $500,000, of which KU
students are expected to contribute
$10,000'
Campus veterans at the Univer-
sity of Minnesota are protesting
the .matriculation fee of S10 a
quarter which the university
charges the veterans directly and
which the Veterans' Administra-
(ion, according to Gen. Omar M.
Bradley, refuses to pay.
the fee at least be lowered to $5.00.
the feet at least be lowered to $5.00.
"No love, no nothing, no more" is
the way the Minnesota Daily sum-
marizes the sentiments of students
Swhose daytime romancing on the

balcony of the Coffman Memorial
Union has been rudely interrupted.
The Union board, tired of climbing
over daytime nighItlifers to reach
their own office, has had the lighting
in the mezzanine improved and the
walls painted a light green instead of
the former deep purple.
e o
Two of the student delegates at-
tending the congress of northwest
colleges and universities, accord-
ing to the Oregon Emerald, will be
sent to the U.N. conference in New
York to present resolutions con-
cerning atomic energy adapted by
the congress. Sixty-two delegates
from 31 schools in Ore., Wash.,
Idaho and British Columbia will
compete for the honor.
Required physical education for
all students, except those in the Jun-
ior Division, has been abolished at
Indiana University, beginning next
fall. The decision was made by a
conference of deans of all the schools
of the university.

University Radio Programs
MONDAY:
Station WKAR
2:30 p.m. EDUCATION IN REVIEW
"Summer Session" presented by Professor Louis M. Eich
and Dr. Donald E. Hargis
2:45 p.m. WORKERS EDUCATIONAL SERIES
"How Good is Social Security" presented by Mr. A. K.
Stevens
Station WPAG
5:45 p.m. CAMPUS NEWS
Prepared by Rosamond Haas of the University News Ser-
vice
Presented by the following students enrolled in broad-
casting classes: Edward Shafter, Jr., of Royal Oak, Michi-
gan; Marjorie Ann Salder of Ellyn, Illinois and William
Ludwig of Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan
TUESDAY:
Station WPAG
5:45 p.m.THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
Student-written, student-enacted radio plays. Directed
by Professor David Owen.

11, i1

Piano solos by Warren Good
Traume .................. Richard Wagner
My Hero, from the Chocolate Soldier ....
Oscar Straus
Into the Night ...... Clara Edward Stevehs
Vocal solos by Betty Martin
accompanied by Ann Crossley
La Gitana ................ Fritz Kreislery
Piece in the Form of a Habenera
Maurice Ravel
Violin solos by Jean Morgan
accompanied by Ruby Kuhlman

WEDNESDAY:
Station WKAR
2:00 p.m. EPOCHS IN MUSIC
Program under the supervision and direction of Profes-
sor Hanns Pick. A program of contemporary composers
2:30 p.m. EDUCATION FOR THE VETERAN
Prepared by Mr. Clark Tibbits of the Veterans Service
Bureau °
Station WPAG
5:45 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIESL
"Facts About Appendicitis," Dr. Farris
THURSDAY:
Station WPAG
5:45 p.m. DOROTHY ORNEST, soprano
A program in the regular series of well-known and best-
loved songs.
Station WJR
11:15 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIES
"Facts About Fractures"
Dr. Isaacson
FRIDAY:
Station WKAR
2:30 p.m. THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
Student-written, student-enacted radio plays.
Directed by Professor David Owen.
Station WKAR
2:45 p.m. RELIGION IN REVIEW
Dr. Edward W. Blakeman, Counselor in Religious Edu-
cation

CLASSIFIED ADVER TISING

To Speak ere
"A Christian Report on Europe"
will be given by Prof. Douglas V.
Steere, of the philosophy department
at Haverford College, at 8 p.m. Thurs-
day in Rackham Amphitheatre.
Prof. Steere has been directing re-
lief work in Europe under the aus-
pices of the American Friends Service
Committee, working principally in the
Scaninavian countries.
SPECIAL!
PP-EA IL.
100 Reams of good quality
20-lb. paper.
Sheet sizes 814 x 101/2
WHILE THEY LAST!

Ij
Ain't you got your 946 ENSIAN sub.
scription yet? You'd better hurry! You
can't get 'em after April 15. That's the
last day -- Monday, April 15.
At the Student Publications Bldg.,
420 Maynard Street, for $4.75. That's
where you get 'em.

6

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Black Parker "51" pen with
Gold Cap. Lost Wednesday, March
28. Please call 6232. Reward.
LOST: On campus, Tuesday. Sigma
Alpha Iota pin with name Barbara
Litchfield on it. Reward. Phone
2-2923.
LOST: Pearls lost in vicinity of
State, North University and Thayer
or Angell Hall. Finder please call
Muriel, 2-1046.
HELP WANTED
KELP WANTED: Fountain help, top
pay, hours to your convenience.
Apply in person to Mr. Lombard or
Mr. Benden. Witham's Drug Store,
corner of S. University and Forest.

WANTED-Experienced waitress for
part time work. Apply Mr. L. W.
Anderson, Willow Run Bowling Al-
leys. 1065 Midway, Willow Run
Village. Phone Ypsi. 1852.
WANTED: Students to wait on tables
or wash dishes at Hillel Founda-
tion all or part of week of April
15-23. Phone Miss Goldberg 2-6585.
WANTED: Waitresses. Both steady
and part time. Dish washer and all.-
around kitchen help and part time
lady for cleaning. Mrs. Monroe.
Farm Cupboard. Ph. 8358.
WANTED
MIDWAY Bicycle Shop, 322 E. Lib-
erty. We have rebuilt used bikes
for sale. Your bike can be expertly
repaired also.
MISCELLANEOUS
RENT A JUKE BOX for your party!
$12.00 including records. Ph. 22878.
FOR SALE: Knight radio phono-
graph combination-$35.00. Room
408, Green House.
FOR SALE: Small-town newspaper
and job printing office for sale. In
Thumb District. $8000 includes
building. Write or call Martin &
Sons Realty Co., 2144 Nat'l Bank
Bldg., Detroit.
FOR SALE: Main floor ticket to May
Festival. Below cost! Phone 2-4561
358 Jordan.

11

50c

BOOKSORE
1216 So. Univ. Ph. 4436

V it

11

HIGHHLIGHTS
from the
BEST SELLERS
at
FOLLETT'S
FICTION
FOREVER AMBER
by Kathleen Winsor . . $3.00
ARCH OF TRIUMPH
by Erich Maria Remarque . .
..................$3.00
THE RIVER ROAD
by Frances Parkinson Keyes
.......................$3.00
WASTELAND
by Jo Sinclair ........$2.50
BEFORE THE SUN GOES
DOWN
by Elizabeth Metzger Howard
.......................$2.75
GENERAL
THE EGG AND I
by Betty MacDonald ... $2.75
STARLING OF THE WHITE
HOUSE
by Edmund W. Starling $3.00
THE ZEBRA DERBY
by Max Shulman ...... $2.00
DETROIT IS MY HOME
TOWN
by Malcolm Bingay .... $3.50
MY THREE YEARS WITH
EISENHOWER
by Captain Harry C. Butcher
USNR ...............$5.00

Buy Easter Seals!
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

U

STARTS
TODAYr

i

I

Now
Today! =PLAYING

Not Since

I

"Buck Privates
Such a
Wonderful

Universal Presents
LgoU

I

I

' ::::::' . '~

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan