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April 04, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-04-04

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PAGE TWO

F IHE MICHIGAN ,DAILY

Can Opener Helps
Slayers in Escape

Campus Highlights

Condemned Men
Flee Death House
WASHINGTON, April 3-(P)-A
sociable card game between two con-
demned killers and two policemen in
the Capital's death house led early
today to the'slayers' sensational es-
cape-with the aid of a can opener.
Joseph D. Medley, convicted of the
murder of one red-haired woman and
implicated by police in the deaths
of two others, was retaken eight
hours later in a sewer pipe where he
was hiding.
Girl Strangled
Earl McFarland, ex-marine con-
victed of strangling a young girl
Youth Hostel
To Hold Folk
Dance Session
Instruction in European Folk danc-
ing by Miss Lola de Grille, folk arts
specialist from the International In-
stitute in Detroit, and a movie on
hosteling in Europe will highlight
the meeting of the folk dance session
of the American Youth Hostel which
will be held at 7:30 p.m. today in Lane
Hall.
As the AYH will sponsor several
trips to Europe this summer to aid
in reconstruction work, the first trips
since the war, the movie will be of
particular interest to members. It
will show scenes from several prewar
hosteling trips, both by foot and bi-
cycle, which got their start in Europe
in 1932.
Members going on the European
trip will sail from New York the lat-
ter part of June and will return early
in September. This group will carry
dehydrated food, sleeping bags and
other equipment in order to meet
their own living needs.
Every hosteler is expected to take
his own bicycle as he will cover as
much as possible of the trip from
country to country in this manner.
The group will spend approximately
two weeks each in Holland, Luxem-
bourg and the French Alps doing re-
building.
These trips are open to all inter-
ested persons. They are asked to call
Janina Niedbala who is in charge of
the program.
Brown Is Elected
To Board of Editors
Prof. Everett S. Brown, chairman
of the political science department,
was elected to membership on the
board of editors of the American Po-
litical Science Review at the meeting
of the American Political Science As-
sociation held recently in Philadel-
phia.
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 7177

Government worker with her own
snood, remained' at large.
An official statement issued by Dis-
trict of Columbia jail officials said
Medley, 44, and McFarland, 24, were
playing cards with two policemen-
guards, Hubert C. Davis and Oscar
C. Sanderlin.
Complained of Illness
Sanderlin "complained of illness'
and went into Medley's cell to lie on
the bunk, the statement related.
"One of the inmates closed the
cell door on officer Sanderlin and
then both inmates overpowered Offi-
cer Davis. After this they locked
Officer Davis in McFarland's cell.
The inmates took the clothing and
all keys of the officers."
Donning the uniforms, the slayers
reached the roof by prying a ven-
tilator open with a can opener. They
then let themselves down 60 feet to
the ground with a rope made of bed-
sheets.1
FBI Search
The escape took place at 5 a.m.
After a morning of intensive search,
in which the FBI tok part, police
seized Medley in a sewer near the
Anacostia River. He was still wearing
remnants of the policeman's uni-
form, bedraggled and grimy.
The two guards were suspended.
Fled Michigan
Medley was a fugitive from the
Michigan Penitentiary when, accord-
ing to a jury's findings, he shot and
killed Mrs. Nancy Boyer, attractive
red-head, after a poker game in her
luxurious apartment here March d,
1945. He already was under indict-
ment in the slaying of another red-
haired woman in New Orleans and
Chicago police sought him for ques-
tioning in the death of a third.
Orgaists Will
PresentRecital
Music From Many
Periods To Be Played
Organ music from the classic, ro-
mantic and contemporary periods of
composition will be heard in a 11ro-
gram to be presented by Kathryn
Karch and Francis Hopper at 8:30
p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
Miss Karch, organist of St. Paul's
.Episcopal Church in Monroe, will
1l he buoyant Fugue a la Gigue by
Bach, and seldom heard compositions
by Karg-Elert and Vierne, late or-
ganist of the Cathedral of Notre
Dame de Paris.
Hopper, a brilliant technician and
colorist, will appear not only as re-
citalist but also as composer. In ad-
dition to a Suite inspired by the One
Hundred Fiftieth Psalm, he will play
four shorter works recently complet-
ed.
The final concert in the series of
f~pr will be presented by Claire Coci
at 4:15 p.m. Sunday. Miss Coci is a
former pupil of Prof. Palmer Chris-
tian'=and has made several nation-
wide concert tours.

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I

SOIC Meeting ...
The executive council of SOIC will
meet at 4:15 today in the Union.
Officers wil be elected at this meet-
ing. The executive head or represen-
tative of each member organization
is asked to attend.
Journalism Hour
The first in a series of Coffee
Hours has been tentatively sched-
uled for Tuesday, April 9, at 4 p.m.
by Prof. John Brunim, chairman of
the journalism department.
Book reviews and original pieces
of writing will be presented at the
coffee hours, which will be held in
Prof. Brumm's office.
Chess Club . .
A meeting to organize a student
chess club will be held at 7:30 p.m.
today in the Union.
A group of undergraduate students,J
including Murray Franklin, Jack
Stern and Gaylord Todd have form-
ulated tentative plans for the group.
In addition to games betwveen ex-
perienced players, there will be tu-
tors and lessons for beginners.
It is expected that weekly meetings
of the club will be held on Thursday
evenings throughout the semester.
Scholarships...
(Continued from Page 1)

C(nterbury Club .

TIDAL WAVE IITS HILO-Lumber and debris litter this section of downtown Hilo, Hawaii, which felt the
full effect of the tidal wave which claimed a possible 300 lives. Sixty bodies have been recovered in Hilo.

DOGS OR COYOTES?
Puppies Interrupt Scientists'
Work at University Museum

Dr. Heymans
Reports Blood
Pressure Test

Three very young and extremely
lively puppies have interrupted the
work of busy research scientists in
the University Museums Building.
The pups, two jemales and one
male, were presented to Ottawa
conservation officers by a farmer who
claimed they were coyotes and asked
a bounty on them. Although he said
he had dug them out of a den, there
was some doubt of his story because,
according to Prof. William H. Burt,
Curator of Mammals in the Museum
of Zoology, the animals resemb'e dogs
more closely than coyotes.
Brought in last month, the puppies,
now eight weeks old, are tame and
friendly. Dr. Burt said, "We will
have to wait perhaps six months be-
fore we can determine whether or

not they are coyote-dog crosses. By
that time their fur will change. Now,
white markings on their light brown
coats and ears, which do not stand
up, indicate that they are probably
dogs. An adult female brought in at
the same time and thought to be
the mother, appeared to be a cross
of coyote and wild dog."
Dr. Burt added that war workers
at Willow Run often brought pets
from home and left them here when
they returned. These pets became
feral, or wild, dogs which have been
found in woods and fields. He saidl
they are not as fierce as coyotes but
are far worse threats as sheep kill-
ers.
In the meantime, the puppies are
under observation

Regulation
By Belgian

Described
Scientist

ASSIFIED ADVEXTISING

Twenty years of experimentation
have revealed that blood pressure is
regulated by the reflex action of
strategically located nerve endings
which act upon the central nervous
system, according to a statement
made here yesterday by Dr. Corneille
Heymans, of the University of Ghent,
Belgium.
Dr. Heymans spoke on "The Regu-
lation of Blood Pressure: Theoretical
and Practical Aspects."
"It is of value in clinical mediciine
to know how blood pressure normally
is regulated," he said, "so that when
a patient suffers from improper
blood pressure a treatment can be
brought about."
Dr. Heymans also said that it has
been found that the chemical con-
stitution of the blood may act upon
certain nerve endings sensitive to
chemical action to regulate blood
pressure. It was formerly believed that
the regulation of blood pressure oc-
curred by means of direct influence
of the blood pressure on the central
nervous system, he said.
Avukah Given Permission
To Change Chapter Name
Avukah, Student Zionist Federa-
tion, received permissionsfrom the
Student Affairs Committee yesterday
to change its name to the University
chapter of the Intercollegiate Zion-
ist Federation of America.

Eric Rackham, education; John Wil-
liams, political science.
University Scholarships, Tuition:
Mary Adams and Maizie Gusakoff,
psychology; Henrietta Alexander
and Lorraine Kruglov, education;
Lois Banzet, speech; Alberta Brown
and Betty Echternach, political sci-
ence; JoAnne Brundidge and Neil
Taylor, Biological Chemistry; Alfred
Chow, chemistry; Martin Cohn, phil-
osophy; Jean Cox, Martha Edelsberg,
Virginia Rock, Dorothy Rush and
Rita Marricco, English;
Mary Dodson, bacteriology; Mar-
ian Dunlap, sociology; Gladys Ehren-
reich and Margaret Farmer, econo-
mics; Jacob Eichhorn, chemical en-
gineering; Phyllis Fleming and Harry
Loberman, physics; Frederick Gehr-
ing, Rodney Hood and Henry Hunter,
mathematics; Cadet Hand Jr. and
George Rinker, zoology;
Jessie Haseman and Ruth Stur-
rock, botany; Marlies Kallmann and
Evelyn Starr, German; Mary McCar-
ron, Latin; Libuse Reed, linguistics;
Martha Reed and Martha Wishard,
history; Clarice Siekmann, social
work; Priscilla Sutherland, Latin and
Greek.

THE RUSSIAN CIRCLE PRESENTS
THE MOTION PICTURE
VOLGA, VOLGA"
and SHORTS
ENGLISH TITLES
TODAY and tomorrow, 8:30 P.M.
Price 45c Rackham Lecture Hall
Tickets on sale at door.

M
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:.

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In--
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additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
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additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
FOR RENT
LIVING QUARTERS and meals in
pleasant, modern country home
two miles from campus available at
once to student and wife in ex-
change for housework and cooking.
Mrs. G. L. Buhrman, Ann Arbor,
8928.
LOST AND FOUND
PEARL NECKLACE, silver clasp, un-
ion or vicinity Sat. night call Bea
Newberry Please. 6596.
LOST: Blue sapphire solitaire ring
on the University golf course Sat-
urday. Reward. Call 26313.
LOST: Parker "51". Pen lost Sat-
urday. Gold Cap. Grey shaft. En-
graved "Joyce Katz". Reward. Call
8598.
LOST: Gray "51" Parker fountain
pen Tuesday. Call Grace Hansen,
24561, Mosher. Reward.
LOST: LogLog Deci-trig Duplex Slide
Rule in Lavoratory Room 3301 East
Engineering Building at 9:10 a.m.
Tuesday, 2 April. Please, contact
F. D. Bond, Apt 8 Vet. Housing.
FIVE DOLLARS REWARD for re-
turn of black notebok bearing in-
scription L. G. Balfour Co. Attle-
boro, Mass. picked up in error.
Phone 9533.

FRATERNITY
boarders. For
Hugh Carpol,
MISCEL

HOUSE would likej
information contactI
8623.
LLANEOUS

LOST: One softball and a bat on Beer
Mountain, Mar. 30th Call Pi Beta
Phi, 24514.
WANTED
WANTED: Teacher of rudiments of
guitar playing, preferably in line
of folk music. Call 5969.
WANTED: < Saleslady in Gift Shop.
Full or part time. Apply 607 E.
Liberty.
MIDWAY Bicycle Shop, 322 E. Lib-
erty.aWe have rebuilt used bikes
for sale. Your bike can be expertly
repaired also.

TYPEWRITERS bought, sold, rented, I
repaired. Work guaranteed. Two
days service. Office Equipment Co.
111 4th. St. Phone 2-1213
CAMPUS O fCHESTRA has open
dates. Five pieces, student-veter-
ans. Phone Ed Morhous, Ypsilanti
1220-W.
SAND, gravel, cement gravel, fill dirt
or any other kind of trucking.
Phone 257435.
HELP WANTED
JUNIOR OR SENIOR male students
interested in working at a YMCA
Camp this summer write to Box 55
Michigan Daily giving previous
experience, age, address, tele. no.
STUDENTS: The Willow Run Bowl-
ing Alley can use students to set
pins one or more nights per week,
also Saturday and Sunday after-
noons. You can earn from $2.00 to
$4.00 per night. We will arrange
your work to fit in with your stud-
ies. If you can use a few extra dol-
lars a week see Bowling Alley Man-
ager. Willow Run Bowling Alley,
1065 Midway, Willow Run Village.
Telephone: Ypsilanti 1852.

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will swing upward
when you try
CONTACT LENS
"the invisible eye glass"
Phone 6019
410 Wolverine Building

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HANDBILLS, ETC.
Downtown: 308 NORTH MAIN
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