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March 29, 1946 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-03-29

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCII 29, 1946

Ieuther Assumes
Presidential Duties
Thomas Elected UAW Vice-President
After Making Sudden Decision To Run

By The Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J., March 28
--Walter P. Reuther took over lead-
ership of the CIO United Auto Work-
ers today and immediately walked
into a potential problem in union
internal affairs.
The man he beat out for the presi-
dency in the union election yester-
day, incumbent R. J. Thomas, was
Truman Says
Coal Mines Will
Not Be Seized
WASHINGTON, March 28-(,')-
The Government has no plans for
seizing the coal mines in event of a
strike, President Truman said to-
day.
To assure supplies for urgent uses,
however, the Government took over
control of the shipment and distribu-
tion of soft coal as of midnight to-
night.
Meanwhile the labor department
sought to avert the nation-wide
strike of 400,000 soft coal miners
scheduled to begin at midnight Sun-
day.
Assistant Secretary of Labor John
W. Gibson, who helped settle the
General Motors Corporation strife,
conferred for an hour with the bi-
tuminous coal operators. He had had
a similar meeting last night with
John L. Lewis.
At both meetings, Gibson said, he
reviewed the progress of negotia-
tions from the point of view of each
side. The meetings, he asserted, were
"exploratory."
The President was asked at his
news conference whether he thought
there would be a coal strike.
Mr. Truman said he had no com-
ment, telling reporters that your
guess is as good as mine.
Reports reaching the producers
here were that some miners already
were starting on "vacation."
. "
Lamipe.
(Continued from Page 1)
stance with a high differential quali-
ty (relative effect between normal
tissue and diseased tissue). It is this
differential quality which explains,
in part, why some forms of cancer
can be cured with X-ray or radium
while others cannot.
"By its very nature radioactivity is
destructive. If a substance is radio-
active it produces ionization-that
is a chemical change of atoms so
that they immediately begin reacting
upon each other in an abnormal fash-
ion. Therefore, it is hoped that a
radioactive element can be found
which will have an affinity for dis-
eased tissue as opposed to normal tis-
sue, greater than anything we now
have."

elected to one of the UAW-CIO's two
posts of vice president.
Overnight Decision To Run
Thomas, making an overnight deci-
sion to run, returned to the union's
official family within less than 24
hours of his defeat by Reuther in
their bitterly fought campaign for
the union's 'top job.
Thus, their positions were reversed.
Reuther had been a vice-president
prior to his victory yesterday in the
UAW-CIO's hottest political battle of
its ten-year history.
Whether this would, mean more
clashes over policy between Reuther
and Thomas, who have had sharp
differences, was a subject for conjec-
ture. As a vice-president, Thomas
will sit on the international executive
governing body of the UAW-CIO.
When asked for comment, Reuther
was brief.
Thomas Agreed To Cooperate
"Thomas has agreed to cooperate,"
he said. "The responsibility is his."
Reports said he had been urged by
friends to make the race to return to
high office in the auto union al-
though he had offers of other assign-
ments in the CI0.
Reuther and Thomas exchanged
pleasantries after today's election
just as they had the day before.
Warren Curry Solos
Warren Curry, president of the
University of Michigan Flying Club,
soloed in 8 hours last week. Curry
started flying when the club pur-
chased its first plane, an Aeronca
Champion.

To JA11,?
G. L. K. Smith
Convicted of
Court Contempt
CHICAGO, March 28-P)-Gerald
L. K. Smith and his public relations
man, Don Lobeck of Detroit, were
convicted today of contempt of court
because of statements distributed to
reporters at the trial of Arthur W.
Terminiello on disorderly conduct
charges.
The statements, introduced in evi-
dence, declared the prosecution in
the Terminiello trial "has no leg to
stand on" and called it a "cold blood-
ed persecution."
Smith, head of the America First
Party, and Lobeck were convicted of
contempt of municipal court by
Judge John V. McCormick.
At conclusion of the contempt trial
in the judge's chambers, at which
four news reporters were principal
witnesses called by city Prosecutor
A. A. Pantelis, Judge McCormick
said:
"Mr. Smith and Lobeck are held
guilty. I intend to impose jail sen-
tences on both of them."
He then continued the contempt
case to April 3, telling Smith's attor-
ney, Maximilian St. George, he would
be given an opportunity to cite law in
the case. Smith and Lobeck were re-
leased on their lawyer's recognizance.
The court dismissed a contempt
citation against Fred Kister, Chica-
go writer and speaker at a Smith ral-
ly Feb. 7 which was accompanied by
a disturbance outside the building on
Chicago's west side.
Judge McCormick is presiding at a
jury trial of Terminiello, suspended
priest of Huntsville, Ala., on disorder-
ly conduct charges stemming from
that meeting. Smith and Kister are
to be tried later on disorderly conduct
charges.

L ,Ons
Saujbula gqqs IRAN'
'KadashtKHAMSEH
Sa eBanehh
_... KURD fSTAN %-"'K
K IRKUK I .-
.D,.HAMADAN
IRAQ Hamadan.=,
KE MANSHA /
0 100 Kermanshah
STATUTE MILES a
IRAN TROUBLE SPOT . . . An
Iranian general staff officer said
yesterday that the government had
ordered the army not to reenter
territory evacuated by the Rus-
sians as U. S. and Britain diplo-
matic officials in Iran said they are
not convinced Soviet troops will
withdraw completely from the
semi-automonous Iranian prov-
ince of Azerbaijan (shaded bor-
der). Question of Red troops in
Iran is on the UNO Security Coun-
cil agenda.

By HELEN ZORN
"Have you signed the petition to
break relations with Franco Spain?"
"Yeah? Are you a veteran, and did
you fight in a war?"
"Break with that fascist? You bet
I will!",
"I don't want another war.
"Who cares if they have fascism
there, just so they don't have com-
munism."
"Good for you kids, but why this
piddling around? Why not come out
for all-out intervention on the part'
of the United States?"
Determination, anger, sincere sup-
port and agreement, every conceiv-
able reaction was demonstrated at
the tables in front of the library and
in Angell Hall where MYDA peti-

tioners secured the names of sixteen
hundred students asking President
Truman for passage of the1 Coffee
Bill, H.R. 312. part of a tribute from
MYDA of 1946 to Americans of the
Lincoln Brigade in 1936 who fought
to wipe out the Franco threat.
"Would it be humane." some of the
dubious asked. "to deprive the Span-
ish people of essential materials and
food by breaking economic relations
with them?" "Recent facts prove
that the people of Spain are starv-
ing," replied Mat Chernotsky, presi-
dent of MYDA, that the forces of lib-
eration are looking to the United
States and the rest of the world for
some signal that we are with them
in their struggle.
A MYDA party will be held at 730

TRIBUTE TO LINCOLN BRIGAI)E:
MYDA Supports Anti-Franco Bill

G. I. IS A GENTLEMAN:
Officers Are No Better Tlui
Enlisted Men, Bill Mauldin Says

Haven at 8:30 p.m. Saturday. The
admission charge will be sent to the
Spanish Refugee Committee for the
ueof displaced per: ons. Tickets
will be sold by members, or will be
available at the door.
Sutper-Seniorlity
Rulings Will B
Ignored by GM
DETROIT. March 28 - General
Motors Corp. has instructed its plants
to ignore "super seniority" rulings of
selective service officials, it was
learned today.
Officials of the nearly 100 GM
plants have been instructed to rein-
state returning World War II veter-
ans on a straight union seniority
basis, pending adjudication of the
"super seniority" principle by the
courts.
The corporation declined comment
on the development;
"Super seniority" gives the veteran
the right to return to his old job re-
gardless of the seniority of the non-
veteran now holding it.
Courts in several states have been
divided in their opinions on the le-
gality of the "super seniority" prin-
ciple and aclarifying decision from
the supreme court is anticipated.
GM's reemployment , tempo was
stepped up again today when 20,000
- additional production employes were
recalled in plants in Michigan and
Indiana. It was the largest number
called back in a single day singe the
strike of 175,000 production workers
began last Nov. 21.
Chrylc r Corp. said 2,000 employes
of its body department were back at
work today following a shutdown
Wednesday which a corporation
spokesman said was caused by a
strike of 40 employes. This spokes-
man attributed the walkout to dis-
gruntlement over the removal by the
company of boxes used as chairs by
the workers.

CLASSII,1i D vu IISNG

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of O10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Encyclopedia Britan-
nica, 13th Edition, in excellent
condition. Priced at $50.00. Phone
24553.
PORTABLE electric phonograph. In
leatherette luggage case. $40.00.
Call Clark Marlor, 6741.
TWO 14EN'S SUITS size 40 excellent
condition. Call 5789 before noon or
after 6.
GOLF BAG AND CLUBS, LADY'S.
Pre-war. Patty Berg Defenders.
Never used. 4 irons and driver, $35.
Call Ypsilanti 3581 W2, in evening
after 6.
FOR SALE: Fireplace wood to season
for next fall. 16" or 24" select hard-
wood. Phone 21285.
HELP WANTED
COOK WANTED. Private boys camp,
northern Michigan, June 23-Aug.
24. Phone 7265.
WANTED
WANTED: Secretarial position by
wife of student. Mornings 8-12. 5
years experience. References. Call
2-3241, 9-5 p.m.

MIDWAY Bicycle Shop, 322 E. Lib-
erty. We have rebuilt used bikes
for sale. Your bike can be expertly
repaired also.
FOR RENT
LIVING QUARTERS and meals in
pleasant, modern country home
two miles from campus available at
once to student and wife in ex-
change for housework and cooking.
Mrs. G. L. Buhrman, Ann Arbor,
8928.
ROOM AND BOARD
MEALS: For girls. Splendid home
cooked meals atLeague House, 604
E. Madison. Phone 4489.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Will the person who picked
up white sweater and windbreaker
in. Room122 Chem Bldg, please
return same to Chem Office, Room
212 Chem Bldg.
LOST - Silver Air Corps Identifi-
cation bracelet bearing name of
E. K. Dodman. Please call "Janet,"
6922.
LOST: Rhinestone ear-clip Saturday,
night in vicinity of campus. If
found, phone 9823, ask for Marilee.
Reward.
BROWN SHAEFFER PEN inscribed
Bette Ellis. Leave at Daily or call
2-1507.
MISCELLANEOUS
DANCE BAND: Vocalist with ex-
perience needed for engagements
in April and May. Other openings.
Call Leland Stewart, 303 Wenley,
2-4401.
CAMPUS ORCHESTRA has open
dates. Five pieces, student-veter-
ans. Phone Ed Morhous, Ypsilanti
1220-W.
SAND, gravel, cement gravel, fill dirt
or any other kind of trucking.
Phone 257435.

A. M. Risner
To Give Recital
At Hill Sunday
Adrienne Moran Reisner, head of
the organ department of Sherwood
School of Music in Chicago, will pre-
sent the second in a series of five or-
gan recitals at 4:15 p.m. Sunday in
Hill Auditorium.
Studied In Chicago
Mrs. Reisner studied piano at the
American Conservatory in Chicago
under Heniot Levy and received her
Masters degree in music at the Uni-
versity in 1941 under Palmer Chris-
tian, professor of organ. She is at
present studying theory and organ
under Leo Sowerby, prominent Amer-
ican composer.
Included in Mrs. Reisner's profes-
sional activities are appearances in
prominent Chicago churches and an
appearance for the Society of Ameri-
can Musicians in Kimball Hall in
Chicago recently. She is serving now
as director of music of the First Con-
gregational Church in Oak Park, Ill.
Third Program To Be Given
The third program in the series,
which is entirely made up of present
or former students of Prof. Christian
will be presented at 8:30 p.m. Tues-
day in Hill Auditorium. The organ-
ists will be Frieda Op't-Holt Vogan,
instructor in organ in the School of
Music and director of music at the
First Presbyterian Church, and Mary
McCall Stubbins, organist at the First
Methodist church. The program will
be entirely devoted to work for or-
gan by Leo Sowerby, prominent
American composer, and head of the
composition department of the Amer-
ican Conservatory in Chicago. Prof.
Sowerby will be here as guest lec-
turer.
Col. C. L. Redman
Assumes Duties
Recently appointed assistant pro-
fessor of military science and tac-
tics at the University ROTC quarter-
master unit, Lt.-Col. Charles L. Red-
man, Jr., has assumed his new du-
ties.
He was previously stationed with
headquarters of the United States
forces in the south Pacific area for
almost three years.

WASHINGTON, March 28-('P)-
Bill Mauldin, famed GI cartoonist,
said today that the army must "Get
rid of the theory that an officer
breathes special air and is a gentle-
man while the enlisted man is not."
The 24-year old cartoonist made
this statement before a board set up
Eight..
(Continued from Page 1)
program equivalent to a third of a
semester, designed to meet the needs
of veterans.
The School of Education will hold
an intercession, which will open June
3 and will run four weeks.
Some courses in education and
public health will be offered on a six
weeks basis.
The annual summer lecture series
will feature "The Social Implications
of Modern Science." The lectures,
under the chairmanship of Prof. Har-
old M. Doi'r, of the political science
department,'will be presented under
the joint auspices of the University
and the American Association for the
Advancement of Science.
The School of Music will offer a
series of concerts.
A program of social affairs will be
offered under the direction of Miss
Ethel McCormick, summer session so-
cial director.
Units of the University which will
offer courses off-campus during the
summer session include:
The Biological Station on Douglas
Lake in northern Michigan;
The National Music Camp at In-
terlochen, offering music and physi-
cal education;
Field courses in geology at Camp
Davis, Wyoming;
Special courses in education and
sociology at the University Fresh Air
Camp at Patterson Lake;
Camp Filibert Roth, in the Upper
Peninsula, maintained by the School
of Forestry and Conservation;
Special courses at the Detroit
Rackham Building.
The University will cooperate with
the universities of Texas and Cali-
fornia in a program at the National
University of Mexico at Mexico City.
Prof. James B. Griffin, of the an-
thropology department and director
of the Museum of Anthropology, will
participate in the work.
The program will be sponsored by
the State Department's division of
intercultural relations.

by the War Department to study of-
ficer enlisted men relationships.
The meeting was closed to report-
ers but Mauldin explained his stand
later to newsmen.
Meantime, Secretary of the Navy
Forrestal acted to get some civilian
advice on Naval practices "disapprov-
ed by the public."
He announced the creation of a
committee of 40 or more civilians to
"Work with the Navy on its postwar
program." The names of the members
will be announced later.
The setup is different from the
board of former officers and enlist-
ed men headed by Lt. Gen. James H
Doolittle which is conducting the
hearing on complaints against the
Army' but its purpose apparently is
somewhat similar, at least in part.
Mauldin, in talking to reporters,
said service newspapers should be
run "For the soldier, and not for the
War Department." He said that in
this way soldiers could let off steam
and consequently improve their own
morale as well as the efficiency of
the service.
He gave this example of what he
was talking about:
"Obviously a soldier can't vote and
decide who should be his command-
ing officer, but if his officer is inef-
ficient, the soldier ought to be able to
call attention to it." He said they can
do this in an Army newspaper.

i"
F
:,

CHAS.
HOGAN'S BAGGAGE
Phone 2-1721
TRUNKS, PARCELS
Small Move Jobs
INSURED

25c ill 5 P.M.. NIGHT and SUNDAYS 30c
Continuous Shows Daily Starting 1:30 P.M.
- 2-TWO FEATURES -2 TODAY andSATURDAY -

WARM.. YieRAN...

Murder St'ikes
Haunted Lighthouse!

RICHARD RIJC1:,W4
Lynn Merrick - Rhys WilUorrt

LISTEN,
MEN!
We have just re-
ceived a shipment
of sportcoats .. .
priced at $16.95.
Come in and take
advantage of this
wonderful offer!

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

FILL YOUR
EASTER BASKETS
with fresh, salted almonds and
they'll be a delight to all.
Our one-pound boxes are only
$1.60. For all kinds of deli-
cious nuts, comc to-
CON FECTIONERY
LUNCHES AND
FOUNTAIN SERVICE

KUUHN'US
CLOTHES SHOP
122 EAST LIBERTY

WANTED: Veteran and wife to live
in private home in Ypsilanti. Care
of two children and assist with
housework for complete board and
room. Ph. 1241-J, Ypsi., after 5:30
p.m.
__ ____- ----_ - --._71I

CFRIDAY, MARCH 15, 1946
7:00-News
7:05-Sleepyhead Serenade
8:00-News.
8:15-Wake Up and Live
8:25-Morning Novelties
8:30-Musical Reveille
8:55-News.
9:00-Music Box.
9:30-Popular Music
9:40-News.
9:45-Moments of Melodies.
10:00-News.
10:05-Music for Remem-
brance.
10:15-Quiz
10:30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Community Calendar.

10:45-Waltz Time.
11:00-News.
11:05-Milt Herth 'T'rio
11:15-Lean Back & Listen.
11:30-Red Cross Program
11:45-Across the Footlights
11:50-Popular Music
11:55-Hit Tunes
12 :00--News.
12:20-Spike Jones
12:20-Today's Band.
12:30_Farm and Home Hour
12:45-Man on the Street.
1:00-News.
1:05-Salon Music.
1:10-victorious Living
1:15--South American Way.
1:25-Flashes From Life
1:30-This Rythruic Age
1:45-Jerry Sears Presents

2:00-News,
2:05-Melody on Parade
3:00-News.
3:05-Arthur Chapman.
3:15-University of Michl-
gan.
3:30-It's a Hit
3:40-It Actually Happened.
3:45-Trade Winds Tavern
4:00-Campus Ballroom
5:00-News
5:05-Rainbow Trio
5:10-Jack Smith Presents
5:15--Mystery Melodies
5:30-Little Show
5:45-Salon Music
6 :00-News
6:15-Along the Sports
Sidelines
6:30-Quiz

I

Continuous
Daily
'from 1 P.M.

,OE'Rp ~ IMfM*4T fAr4V(

Weekdays
30c to 5 P.M.

GAMMA NU CHAPTER
of
SIGMA NU
FRATERNITY
desires to contact
ALL ACT IVES and PLEDGES
|n I(*1-N IN A AC it

I

NOW PLAYING-

r

I' ----~-_________ -- ___--*---- -_________

II
I,
;

"CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
UTILIZING DIVINE POWER"

- A Free Lecture -

Lectturcr: LEONARD T. CARNEY, c.s.L,. of Beverly Hills,
California, Member of the Board of Lectureship of The
Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, Scientist,
in Boston, Massachusetts.

I ii

11111

I 1 MLHLL URKUN ' GLAUR KAM 11 1

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