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November 11, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


PAGE TWO
BAR PREPARATION:
Case ClubWillResume
Ac (ivities; Judges Na med
Active for nearly 23 years, the Case prizes according to the individual's
Club, a voluntary student conducted outcome.
organization, will begin activities Alumnus Gives Prize Money
next week under the leadership of The income of money from which
four student judges, John Dobson, the prizes are drawn was given to the
University by Henry M. Campbell,
one of the judges announced yester- Detroit lawyer. Mr. Campbell gradu-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1945

Y ,.... ., _

day.
Four Leaders Chosen
Composed of students in the Law
School, the winners of junior club ar-
guments last year, Leonard Hyman,
Alden Johnson, John Dobson, and
Richard Peters were appointed to
supervise each of the four clubs of
the Case Club.
The clubs operate under the fol-
lowing system: the 141 members of
the organization, divided according
to class among the three freshmen
clubs and one junior club, are paired
arbitrarily by the judges and grouped
in fours to argue cases within their
respective clubs; after all the cases
have been tried, each senior judge
chooses the freshman presenting the
best case in his club to compete in
a final argument with the other three
freshman winners; two senior judges
and one member of the faculty choose
four juniors to compete in a final
junior case. The eight chosen win-
ners are awarded first or second

ated from the University in 1878.
Russian Circle
Plans Meetig
Group Will Elect New
Officers Tomorrow
Russky Kruzhok, Russian Circle,
will hold the first meeting of the
semester at 8 p. m. tomorrow in the
International Center.
An election of officers will be held
and plans formulated in reference to
prospective speakers for future meet-
ings.
During the summer, the Russian
Circle inaugurated a series of talks
at which faculty members Dr. George
Kiss, Dr. Mischa Titiev and Prof. A.
Lobanov-Rostovsky spoke on subjects
pertaining to Russia. The Russky
Kruzhok will continue with this pro-
gram during the school year.

Prineipals o
Gather Here
For Meeting
Program to Include
Student Conferences
The 17th Annual Principal-Fresh-
men Conference, sponsored by the
Registrar's Office in cooperation with
the University Committee on Rela-
tions with Secondary Schools, will be
held Thursday.
The program includes scheduled
student conferences to be held from
8:30 a. m. to noon in the Rackham
Building, and luncheon in the Mich-
igan League Ballroom. President
Alexander G. Ruthven and Dr. James
P. Adams, Provost of the University,
will be the speakers at the luncheon.
Following the luncheon, "Common
Objectives of Education in High
School and College" will be the dis-
cussion topic. Virgil M. Rogers, sup-
erintendent of schools in Battle Creek,
and Prof. Richard C. Boys of the
English department will lead the dis-
cussion.
An el1lllW ill -!tl -
old U' Studios
Studios being constructed on the
fourth floor of Angel Hall will tem-
porarily house the University Broad-
casting Service upon completion early
in 1946, Prof. Waldo Abbott, director,
announced yesterday.
Morris Hall, the present home of
the Broadcasting Service, will be
torn down to provide a site for the
new Service Building to be con-
structed during the year.

PICTURED ABOVE IS SGT. FREIDERIC HENSEL SHAVING WITH
THE USE OF ARTIFICIAL ARMS-his wife, Jewell, looks on.
Limbless Okinawa Soldier
Manipiilates Artificial Limbs

HELP REQUESTED:
!-1 - 0
Fipmo Major Stresses Need
For Rehabilitation of Islands

Ey BETTY ANN LARSEN
"We need rehabilitation - finan-
cially, economically and cultural-
ly-," Filipino Major Fred Castro said,
in an interview yesterday.
"You can never realize how sys-
tematically the Japanse devastated
the courtry. They even destroyed
all the libraries so that only a few
books remain."
Major Castro, who with four
other Filipino officers has been
sent to the Judge Advocate Gen-
eral's School by the American gov-
ernment, made an appeal to the
United States for help in that re-
habilitation because "the Philip-
pines are a bit of America in the
Orient."
"We have fought side by side in a
common cause of defeating the en-
emy," he pointed out, "and now we
must join ourf forces again to create
a new Philippines."
"You must not think that we are
ungrateful for what you have done
already, for you can never knew how
much we appreciated your help."
"During our stay in this coun-
try," he said, "one of the things
which has impressed us especially is
the universal courtesy and warm
friendliness we have found every-
where."
"Another thing,which you may
take for granted, is the vastness
and beauty of your land."
In explaining the purpose of the
land warfare course, Major Castro
said that "we are studying this
course in order to participate with
the United States Army in the prose-
cution of Japanese war criminals."
"We are studying with a vengeance,
for there is not on Filipino family
which has not suffered torture, death
or loss of property at the hands of
the enemy."
Major Castro was captured at Ba-

taan and made the infamous Death
March to the O'Donnell prison camp.
When it was discovered that he
knew Japanese, Major Castro was
put to work as an interpretor. Later
he was forced to do many more me-
nial tasks, however, and the climax
came when he was sent to load am-
munition to use against Filipino guer-
illas.
That night he decided to escape.
And he did. It wasn't until he
learned that his family were being
held as hostages that he gave him-
self up. Japanese officers were not
benevolent and Major Castro suf-
fered many kinds of medieval tor-
tures-such as the "water cure"-
at the hands of his captors.
After several months of this
captivity and torture, Major Cas-
tro, who is a lawyer, was "paroled"
to continue his practice.
Law was not his only occupation,
because there was an underground in
the Philippines and Major Castro
was a member of that underground.
When Manila was liberated he was
one of the men who guided American
troops around barricades, boo by
traps, and mines.
He served as a staff officer in
the Military Intelligence service
before the fall of Bataan and is
also Chief of the War Crimes Di-
vision of the Philippine J.A.G.D.
While attending the University of
the Philippines-"where college life
is very similar to life on this cam-
pus"-Major Castro was editor of
the college newspaper.
Major Castro and the four other
officers, who will graduate Nov. 20
with the 25th Officer Class of the
J.A.G. school, have plans to visit New
York City and Washington before
they return to the Philippines in De-
cember.

,i

IAROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

=-- I

BATTLE CREEK, Mich., Nov. 10-
(P-Master Sgt. Frederic Hensel, only
World War II battle casualty who lost
both legs and arms, wasn't just talk-
ing six months ago when he said he'd
"get along all right."
And now he's proving what he
said. Wearing his two new artificial
arms and hooks, the 27-year-old sol-
dier from Corwin, Ky., is happier than
a child at Christmas at being able to
feed himself, write, turn pages, shave
-every day brings something new.
Smiling broadly he drawled, "Why,
I'll be out of this man's army in six
months-I hope."
Both Hensel's legs were blown off

above the knees and his left arm
above the elbow last June when he
stepped on a mine on Okinawa. A
few days later his right hand was am-
putated.
Like all other GI amputees, Hensel
won't be released from the hospital
until he masters walking on the arti-
ficial legs he hopes to have within a
couple of months and can perform
many accomplishments with his
hooks.
He's doing pretty well with the
hooks even though he's had them less
than a month. Naturally independ-
ent, the Kentuckian wants to be as
self sufficient as possible- and that
means a minimum of help from his
pretty wife Jewell and Pfc. Isadore
Halpern, Philadelphia, who have
taken care of him since he arrived
here.

SUN., NOV. 11, 1945 10:30-Charlie Barn ett. 12:45-Bible Hour.
8:00-News. 10:45-Jesse Crawford. 1:00-News.
8:05-Organ Music. 11:00-News. 1:15-Boy Scouts of Amer-
8:15-Jimmy Wakely. ica.
8:30-Frankie Masters. 11:05-Bethlehem E hurch. 1:30-Jerry Sears.
9:00-News. cal Reformed Church. 2:00-News.
9:05-Ralph Ginsburg. 12:00-News. 2:05-Les Brown.
9:30G-Ave Maria Hour. 12:05-Mario Morelli. 2:15-Charlie Spivak.
10:00--News. 12:15-Know Your Govern- 2:30-Wladimir Sefinsky.
10:15-Michigan Highway ment. 2:55-Football (Detroit
Department. 12:30-Music & Verse. Lions).
If

i

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

I

'

WANTED
WANTED MEN'S CLOTHING-A
better price paid for men's used
clothing. Sam's Store, 122 E.
Washington St.
WANTED - Experienced Musicians
interested in dance work with for-
mer Campus Band leader. Lee
Brant. 527 Elm, 5291.
WANTED-Magazine publisher is
seeking experienced stenographer.
Campus area. Permanent. Call 7205
for interview.
WANTED: Girls for breakfast. 7:30-
9:30. 1513 S. University. Tel. 4701.
ATTENTION SAGINAW STUDENTS
"Saginaw News" campus corre-
spondent desires news and social
items. Contact Gwen Sperlich, 581
Jordan, 2-4561.
WANTED: One concert series tickets,
preferably 1st balcony seat. Call
Madelyn Heeney, 26112, after seven
p. m. -
WANTED: Boy to wash dishes. Mar-
tha Cook Bldg. Apply any morn-
ing.
FOR RENT
LARGE BEAUTIFULLY FURNISH-
ED ROOM with adjoining private
bath for 1 or 2 gentlemen. Phone
Ypsilanti 990-W. 1200 Whittier Rd.,
Ypsilanti.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Red crepe, blue chiffon
velvet formals . . . Full length in-
terlined black velvet wrap, ermine
trim . . . size 12-excellent condi-
tion-Phone 8354.
ROOM AND BOARD
ACCOMMODATE GIRLS FOR eve-
ning dinners. Excellent home cook-
ed meals at League house. 604 E.
Madison. Phone 4489.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-BROWN LEATHER WALLET
containing valuable identification.
Ethel Lester, Martha Cook Build-
ing. 2-3225.
BROWN LEATHER WALLET con-
taining valuable identification.
Ethel Lester, Martha Cook Build-
ing. 2-3225.
LOST-Gold Gruen wrist watch with
Roman numerals. Reward. Call
Helen Kearney 22539.
LOST: Blue lady's wallet containing
identification and snapshots. Finder
may keep money. Bring to Box 1,
Michigan Daily office or phone
Helen Balowin. 2-3279.
WILL THE PERSON who took by
mistake my tan covert top coat with
two keys in pocket and a Wagner
label inside please call Bill Layton
at 9009. I have yours! It happened

LOST: Small black and gold Shaef-
fer fountain pen and red pencil
behind Haven Hall. Call Caroline
Gooley, 2-5553.
LOST-One black and silver striped
Eversharp Pen between North Uni-
versity and Washtenaw at Hill.
Call 2-1568.
LOST: Silver top to Parker 51 pen.
No use to anybody but me. Ellen
Johnson 6990.
LOST-One creamed colored rain-
coat-belt and a print silk scarf.
Contact 4121 Ext. 106, Allene Gol-
linkin.
LOST: Ladies silver identification
bracelet with initials Z & X raised
on front name. Lois Johnson on
back. Call 8942. Reward.
LOST FRIDAY: Shell rimmed glasses
in green case in Natural Science.
Call 429 Mosher, 24561.
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments.
New address, 410 Observatory. Vi-
cinity of Stockwell Hall. Phone
2-2678. Alta Graves.
MISCELLANEOUS
TALENTED? Entertainer? Why not
join up with Hillel Foundation
dramatic and music group? Call
-26585.

'Broadcasting Program Giveir
The University Broadcasting Service will broadcast the following
programs for the week of November 12 to November 19.
MONDAY:
Station WKAR
2:30p.m.: "Conflicting Views on School Discipline."
Warren Good, Instructor in Educational Psychology.
2:45 p.m.: "High Pressure Natural Gas Fields."
Dr. D. L. Katz, Professor of Chemical Engineering.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m.: "Campus News." Prepared by the University News
Service and presented by Joan Mahey Swartz and Keith
McKenney.
TUESDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m.: School of Music Program.
WEDNESDAY:
Station WKAR
2:15 p.m.: School of Business Administration Series "Why I Want
to Go into Business for Myself." Panel of Veteran's enrolled
in the Short Course of Business Management. Under the
direction of Charles Jamison, Professor of Business Policy.
2:30 p.m.: School of Music Program. Group of Classical favo-
rites under the direction of Professor Hanns Pick.
2:45 p.m.: Michigan Sport Parade. Les Etter, Public Relations
Manager for the Department Intercollegiate Athletics. ....
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m.: The Medical Series. "The Eyes and Heredity." Dr.
Harold Falls, Professor of Ophthalmology.
THURSDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m.: "Student Interest in Religion." Dr. Edward W. Blake-
man, Counselor in Religious Education.
Station WJR
11:15 p.m.: The Medical Series. "Are Anermias and Other Blood
Disorders Inherited?" Dr. Frank Bethell, Professor of Internal
Medicine and Assist. Dir. of Simpson Memorial Institute.
FRIDAY:
2:45 p.m.: Bureau of Cooperation with Educational Institutions
"New Occasions, New Duties in Michigan Schools." Dr. Harlan
C. Koch, Professor of Education.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m.: "Adventures in Research."
"The Gas that Won't Burn."

I

Studentsoi Stretdch Your Vacaition
By Using AIR TRAVEL
We have been able to open new space on flights to the following points
during the Christmas Holidays:
CLEVELAND . . . AKRON . . . BUFFALO .. . ROCHESTER
SYRACUSE . . . CHICAGO . . . ELMIRA . . . NEW YORK
Reservations should be made now. Rates are surprisingly low.

Boersma Travel

S C V I1.C(C

Inc(.

336 South State Street

Phone 4622

Mezzanine - Slater's Book Store

'1-

-..o.

I' I

.1
r

Bonds Bought at this Theatre Receive Free Tickets
for "Week-End at the Waldorf" Nov. 28th

STARTS TDY
One of the Finest
Pictures of the Year!

VICTORY BONDS ISSUED HERE!
,..uA 5'EW T7

HEART-TUGGING! LAUGH - PROVOKING! ACN - PACKED!!

_ f11

You1~ o K~t''~~ove l~ctSYLAL
_1f/
S!LtY sull Ali f I~ci~T~
SmeGlW presents\
II

$14am

J,.
Oi

: ..:
.'q F::

gdooad '

VIRGINIA MAYO
VERA-ELLEN
Donald Woods - S. Z. Sakall
and the Goldwyn Girls

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mIF

I ~ ~ :.~.::i~~''' III U ~~i ni EuIii I f n n arn ni /ni l N~I~.1Ht.'I"

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