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November 04, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-04

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEM 3ER 4$

TWO SUYDAY, NOVEMBER 4,

NO CAUSE FOR JOY:
Term Opening Regarded As
Headache by Revelli and Band

To many students, the opening of
a new term is a cause for pleasant an-
ticipation, but to the personnel of
the University Marching Band a new
term means a headache, in the con-
sidered opinion of the band's director,
Prof. William D. Revelli.
Organized into a complete unit for
the summer term, the break in semes-
ters has disrupted the personnel of
the marching unit, and with the loss
of 35 per cent of its musicians be-
tween terms, new members must be
secured and initiated into the intri-
cate system of formations that have
made the University Marching Band
one of the foremost in the nation.
Behind-Scene Activities
Its first meeting of the fall term
held only last Tuesday, the band was
already functioning on the gridiron
yesterday. The popular reception it
received was due to the behind-the-
scenes activity that must precede
each appearance.
Every maneuver of the band is
carefully planned beforehand on a
miniature reproduction of the foot-
ball gridiron, with small figures rep-
resenting each man in the band. The
formations are staged by moving the
fgures on the model.
Split-second Timing
Split-second timing is the keynote
to the band's successful maneuvers.
Winter Heralds
Return of Colds
The cold season is back again and
with it the danger of the 'cold germ.'
Students are urged to take precau-
tions at the first sign of this common
affliction by checking with Health
Service. Hoarseness and congestion
in the chest should be watched, Dr.
Margaret Bell, physician at Health
Service, pointed out. If you don't
care about yourself, she said, at least
consider others with whom you come
in contact during classes.
Three cases of pneumonia have al-
ready been reported this semester.
The danger of glandular fever is
as great as ever, Dr. Bell said.

Difficulties of music performance,
dress and alignment are heightened
by the band's cadence, Prof. Revelli's
unit marching to a metronome speed
of 156, as compared to the usual band
cadence of 132.
Tryouts are still being held, Prof.
Revelli announced, and new men are
being placed in the ranks.

Regents

CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS
Dr"~ t i, uVisits & ced, and i ansfor the coming
NO 7 L ri" - - - year's trips, co. erts, broadcasts,
anti serenades will be presented.
Dr. Yi-fang Wu, renowned Chinese All men on carmpus are invited.
educator and alumna of the Univer-
sity, arrived in Ann Arbor yesterday .
to visit Mrs. Mable Ross Rhead, piano dUsi ll IO aSS . . .
instructor in the School of Music.
Dr. Wu will meet a group of Chi-. Any persons interested in a class
nese and American girls at Stockwell in beginning Russian are asked to
Hall, tonight. contact Mrs. Lila Pargment at Uni-
President of Gin-ling college, lo- versity extension 431 or at her
cated in Chungking since the war, home, telephone 7953.
Dr. Wu received her PhD. in zoology The course will be offered by the
herein 128. he as oe ofthe University Extension Service, be-
here in 1928. She was one of the gnnn oprvddheessu-
principal Chinese representatives at ginning soon, provided there is suf-
the San Francisco conference. ficient demand.
Men's Sm okerD *n*
A 15-piece dance orchestra, com-
A Smoker for men interested in posed of members of the V-12 unit
joining the Glee Club will be held on campus, has been organized on a
at 4:30 p.m. today in the Glee non-profit basis to play for local
Club Room at the Union. dances, Lieut. A. I. Wyandt announc-
Although this Smoker was ar- ed yesterday.
ranged especially 'for the students The orchestra played its first en-
unable to a t t e n d Wednesday's gagement of the season Thursday at
meeting, new songs will be intro- the League dance.
CL4SSIFIED -DVE TISING_]

" s .

(Continued fron Page 1)
Engineering Drawing in the engi-
neering school, was granted a sab-
batical leave for the fall term of
1945-46. He has been on the staff
for 40 years without requesting a
leave.
Leaves of absences were granted to
Prof. Joseph K. Yamagiwa of the
Department of Oriental Language and
Literatures from Oct. 26 to Jan. 1,
1946; to Prof. Clyde E. Love of the
mathematics department for the aca-
demic year; to Dr. Gage Helms of
the Department of Dermatology and
Syphilology of the medical school,
from Oct. 1 to July 1, 1946.
Dr. Yamagiwa will participate in
the United States Bombing Survey of
Japan as a bombing analyst at the
request of the United States govern-
ment.
The Regents appointed Dean Emer-
itus Myra Beach Jordan and Fred-
erick P. Jordan, associate librarian
emeritus, jointly or the survivor, as
recipient of the income of the Wil-
liams Professorship Fund. The fund
was originally raised by the alumni
to provide for the declining years of
Prof. George P. Williams, member of
the first faculty of the University.
Posthumous degrees "Honoris Cau-
sa" were approved forsstudents who
went into the armed service within
two years of completing the require-.
ments for a bachelor's degree and
died while in service.
The Regents also accepted two
scholarships established by the Uni-
versity of Michigan Club of Detroit.
Each will be for $130.00 per year.

Senate Hunts
Missing Jap
War Message
Service Merger, Free
Press Are Problems
By DOUGLAS B. CORNELL
WASHINGTON, Nov. 3-Congress
pried into these intriguing topics to-
day:
Reports of a missing message said
by some senators to show that Japan
was going to fight the United States.
A hitherto secret survey that
showed high Navy officers at one
time were split about fifty-fifty on a
merger with the Army.
Ad this was going on, too, on a
day when neither Senate nor House
was open for business:
Required Free Press
A powerful group of House mem-
bers disclosed plans to tack onto
every bill for helping foreign coun-
tries a requirement for a "free press."
Republican members of a Senate-
House committee investigating the
Pearl Harbor disaster were said to be
on the hunt for that reportedly miss-
ing war message.
They want to find out whether this
report is true or untrue:
The Navy, before the Japanese
smash at Pearl Harbor, decoded a
Japanese message: "East winds, rain-
ing."
This was supposed to have sig-
nalled enemy forces that the war was
on.
Now the message is missing from
war department files. And records or
radio monitoring stations for the pe-
riod of its interception have been de-
stroyed.
Service Merger Poll
That Army-Navy merger survey
counted noses 10 months ago. The
joint chiefs of staff polled 40 Army,
37 Navy and 3 Marine officers. Now
the study has been turned over to
the S en a te Military Committee,
which is considering a merger. It
shows:
"Almost exactly half" the Navy
officers favored a single department
of defense. So did the "great major-
ity" of Army men.
But since the survey was made,I
some admirals, like Chester W.
Nimitz and William F. Halsey, have
changed their stand. Now the Navy
is battling a merger.

*I * *
Nation's Strike
Idle Increases

i

Signs Indicate Stormy Sessions
In Labor-Management Meeting
Business Wants To Discuss Industrial Peace;
Reluctant To Act on Wage-Price Issue Now
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 3-All the signs in this jam-packed city today
pointed toward some stormy sessions when leaders of labor and business sit
down together next week for discussions which will chart the course of the
nation's future labor-management relations.
Representatives of both labor and business have professed publicly
their optimism over the results expected from the labor-management con-
ference opening tomorrow.
Pre-conference caucuses of management delegates disclosed that
most of them want the conference to go on record favoring the inclusion of

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
HELP WANTED

FOR RENT
LARGE BEAUTIFULLY FURNISH-
ED ROOM with adjoining private
bath for 1 *or 2 gentlemen. Phone
Ypsilanti 990-W. 1200 Whittier Rd.,
Ypsilanti.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Small silver ident bracelet
engraved: "Helen." Sentimental
value. 401 Betsy Barbour.
LOST: Kodak folding camera. Be-
longs to service man and is of great
personal value. Probably lost in
League. Finder call 2-3790. Reward.
LOST: Tri Delt sorority pin on cam-
pus. Call Carol Giordano. Phone
23203.

Eastern Bus Tie-up
Threatens To Spread
By The Associated Press
The nation's strike idle, up 1,000
since yesterday, has risen to 269,000.
Major strike developments:
Shipbuilding -24-hour "protest"
work stoppage by 75,000 to 100,000
AFL Union members in New Orleans
threatened if congress refuses to in-
vestigate closing of three Higgins in-
dustries plants.
Transportation - Strike of AFL
Greyhound bus drivers in 19 Eastern
states threatens to spread to nation-
wide walkout; strike of Oklahoma
drivers called for midnight Saturday;
presidents of two strike-bound Grey-
hound divisions decline government
offer to meet with union in Washing-
ton.
Machinists-Six-day strike of ma-
chinists affecting 60,000 workers in
200 San Francisco Bay area plants
continues; labor, management blame
each other for deadlock.
Lumber-Settlement between non-
striking CIO lumber workers and Big
Fir operators termed by federal con-
ciliators a "hopeful sign" toward end-
ing 40-day strike of 60,000 AFL lum-
ber workers in Pacific Northwest.
Jewelry-1,000 New York City dia-
TYPE WRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICE SUPPLIES
0. D. MOPRRILL
314 S. State St. Phone 6615

penalty clauses in agreements, an of-
ficial of the national association of
manufacurers said. In case of a
breached contract, workers would be
penalized by having wages and vaca-
tion pay withheld, or by some other
action.
The business delegation does not
want the wake-price question to come
before the conference. Their position
is that this controversy can only be
settled by collective bargaining-and
that it was not President Truman's
intention, in calling the meeting, to
have anything discussed except meth-
ods of minimizing labor strife.
However, labor leaders assert the
wage-price question is the basic
cause of controversy and for this
reason should be brought out into the
open in conference discussions.
mond cutters, earning $115 weekly,
strike for 25 per cent wage increase,
two-week vacation; union t e r m s
walkout "wildcat" strike.
STOP IN ANYTIME
from 12 noon to 12 midnite
for
TOASTED
SANDWICHES
HAMBURGS
HOT DOGS
DRINKS
CHATTERBOX
800 South State

1945-46 LECTURE COURSE
10 VITAL TOPICS
10 DISTINGUISHED SPEAKERS
Opening TUESDAY, Nov. 6, 8:30

HELP WANTED: Cosmetic girl, days
only. Part time can be arranged.
Marshall Drug Co. 235 So. State.
WANTED
WANTED: Waiters, dishwashers to
work for room and board. Minimum
hours. Call 4315. Arthur Gronik
Z.B.T. House, 2006 Washtenaw.
WANTED: Boarders at the Theta
Delt house. 700 S. State. Excellent
meals, standard rates. Call Jim
Stelt 2-3297.

:,

WANTED: Male reader for blind stu-
dent. 30c hour up to 20 hrs. week.
Jerry Dunham 1111 S. University.
Rear apt.
ATTENTION SAGINAW STUDENTS
"Saginaw News" campus corre-
spondent desires news and social
items. Contact Gwen Sperlich, 581
Jordan, 24561.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Tuxedo suit and dress
suit with tails. Size 39 long. Roth-
child make and Kuppenheimer styl-
ing. Complete with all accessories.
In perfect condition. Phone 3055
until 7 p. m.
WANTED TO RENT
HAVE A HEART, landlords. Ex-sub-
marine officer has been dreaming
for three long years of the time,
when he could have a home with
his wife and children. Urgent, two
bedrooms, furnished or unfurnish-
ed to $55.00 by Dec. 1 or 15. Lt.
Elmer, 580 Hampton Rd., Grosse
Pointe, Michigan.

LOST-- Black and white Shaefer pen
engraved with Anita Bedard. Please
leave message with 24471. Reward.
LOST-One strand of pearls, round
rhinestone clasp. Great sentimental
value. Reward.
LOST: One Collegiate Sorosis pin.
Engraved on back. Clara L. Nack
'37. Also one green Parker pen.
Reward.
LOST: Silver identification bracelet
inscribed Patricia. Name and date
on back. Reward. Return to
Michigan Daily.
ROOM AND BOARD
SAE FRATERNITY is serving three
meals daily at their house conve-
niently located- to campus. Those
interested in taking advantage of
this opportunity call Tom Fellows
at 2-1349 immediately.

4

War Bonds
Issued Here

Shows Continuous
From 1 P. M.
- -AY

Uw

VACANCY IN WOOD
House for college girl.
block from campus.
Avenue.

LEAGUE
One half
725 Haven

MISCELLANEOUS
BROTHERS OF KAPPA SIGMA and
past pledges, send your present
address to Brother John Stephens,
434 Williams West Quadrangle.
Buy Victory Bonds!

Helen Gahagan Douglas
CONGRESSWOMAN FROM CALIFORNIA
AND FORMER STAR OF STAGE AND SCREEN

You are always Welcome
at
MARSHNALL'S & WiTHAMS
DRUG STORES
DRGST IN and ENJOY
OUR FINE FOUNTAIN SERVICE!
TASTY SANDWICHES - RICH-TESTED MALTEDS
SODAS AND SUNDAES
at
ANN ARBOR'S FINEST SODA BARS
Marshall's!1a
235 South State 601 South Forest

i

"THE PRICE OF WORLD PEACE"
COMPLETE COURSE: Nov. 6, Mrs. Douglas; Nov. 28, Owen
Lattimore, "Solution in Asia"; Dec. 5, Vincent Sheean, "Per-
sonal Opinion"; Dec. 11, Richard Wright, "The American
Negro Discovers Himself"; Jan. 16, Frances Perkins, "The
Destiny of Labor in America"; Feb. 5, Madame Vijaya Lakshmi
Pandit, '"The Coming Indian Democracy"; Feb. 15, Guthrie
McClintic, "The Theater, Reminiscences and Predictions";
March 5, Edmund Stevens, "Russia Is No Riddle"; March 12,
Robert Boothby, "Britain Looks to the Future"; March 21,
Leland Stowe. "What We May Expect in the Future."

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