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February 15, 1946 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-02-15

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TH E MI CH IG A N D AILY

IrIDAY, VEBRUARY 15, 1946

1

,Ce tier6 to the 6 LitoN

Irbitrciry Ruling it stands now, either you knuckle under, or go
back home and start looking for another college.
o the Editor: Realizing that most of the boys felt they had
AST TUESDAY, less than two weeks before been the victims of an unfair and peremptory
the end of the semester, the civilian stu- action, one of the students at Allen Rumsey
ents living in the West Quad were informed began circulating a petition objecting to the
y a notice from the Acting Director of Resi- order. After collecting about 65 names (there
ences that during the spring term they would are about 110 students at Allen Rumsey), he
11 be required to eat in the West Quad dining put the petition on the house bulletin board so
>om whether they liked it or not. Though others might sign. But somehow it didn't stay
iere had been vague rumors on the subject, no there very long.
ear indication had been given before that such We believe that this decree defenitely pre-
move was to be made. sents a hardship to a lot of boys at the West
During the first semester when meals were Quad, and an inconvenience to many more, and
ot being served, the residents of Allen Rumsey that by writing this letter, and bringing the
nd Wenley, the two houses concerned, had been matter to the surface, our situation may be
ee to eat wherever they wished. Many of the improved.
oys had gotten jobs at sororities or fraternities, --Robert Carneiro, Ivan Edward Harris,
etting their meals free, and occasionally re- Stephen Krebs, George K. Cram, Wal-
eiving stipend besides. Others had worked in ter E. Amick, Robert C. Buckborough
he Union cafeteria or elsewhere for their meals, (EDITOR'S NOTE: University authorities announced
hile still others who didn't feel they wanted yesterday afternoon that the inequities referred to
>bs ate WHERE they wanted and WHEN they in this letter would be eliminated by providing jobs
in University residence halls or rooms in Fletcher
anted. hall, where no meals will be served, for men who
As a result of the new edict, though, all civil- require such arrangements. See story on page one
for details.)
ms at the West Quad will be obliged to pay _ _
e University an additional $141.70 for the
rivilege of eating at the dining room, at speci- I D RATHER BE RIGHT:

'Taking the Walk for a Dog'

Acting for History
By SAMUEL GRAFTON
THERE HAS still been no adequate explana-
tion of why Russia took up the cases of
Greece and Indonesia before the Security Coun-
cil with such a high degree of fervor and as-
saulting zeal. She must have known she would
be voted down, that she could not hope to induce
the Council to expel the British from Greece, or
to take any measure of international control
over Indonesia. In other words, she knew she
would be defeated, yet she pressed the issues
anyhow. The only explanation that has been
offered is that Russia acted in a spirit of school-
boy pique, angered by British pressure to clear
her out of Iran. But while it may be comforting,
it seems somehow implausible, to class the Rus-
sians as schoolboys; and if pique is the explana-
tion for Russian behavior, this must surely be one
of the biggest piques in history, a kind of Pike's
pique.
Dudgeon hardly seems an adequate answer;
even a large dudgeon. It seems to me that, if
there is an answer, it may perhaps be found in
a shifting Russian conception of what the United
Nations is, or are. It will be recalled that, up
to a few weeks ago, the Russians regarded the
United Nations Organization as a kind of execu-
tive committee of the victors in the late war,
as a continuation into the peace of the Grand
Alliance which had won the war.
Mr. Molotov made it clear, in his important
November 6 speech, that he did not expect the
United Nations Organization ever to take action
against any of the great powers, that he thought
of it more as an agency which would take con-
tinuing action on behalf of the great powers
against the remnants of fascism in the world.
It was during the period when the Russians were
speaking in this manner that they remained
meekly tolerant of British activities in Greece,
even when those activities were directed against
communists.
But the western powers have always regarded
the United Nations Organization more as a par-
liament, and as an arena, rather than as an
executive committee of the victors in the war.
The real importance of the huge Vishinsky out-
bursts on Greece and Indonesia, it seems to me,
is that they indicate the Russians have come to
accept this view of the United Nations Organiza-
tion as the reality. With the coalition fading,
they have made a characteristic quick shift,
substituting parliamentary tactics for coaliton
tactics; and (this is also rather typical of them
when they change their minds) they have gone
to it with a whole-hearted vehemance which
has astounded the world.
THE RUSSIANS have given up their former
view that the United Nations Organization
is a place where the great powers meet to agree;
they have accepted the view that it is a place
where the great powers meet to dispute in pub-
lic. This need not necessarily mean that the
Russians have ceased to cooperate; it is a case
of cooperation at one level, and struggle at an-
other level. And on the level of struggle the
Russians are setting up what might be called
"long lines" of policy; they feel, perhaps, that
ten years from now, as history synopsises the
story of today, and drops out the details, the
Greeks will remember only that the Russians
wanted to put the British out, and the Indones-
ians will recall only that the Russians tried to
free them.
The counter-arguments will be forgotten; it
is like the old League of Nations again, with
Litvinov arguing, all alone, for immediate world
disarmament; he never got a vote in the cham-
ber, but he found an audience outside.
This is not schoolboy stuff, but another chap-
ter in the long and intricate fight to capture
the imaginations of men. The danger is that
we of the west will be held on the defensive,
winning in the hall and losing outside. We must
find some way affirmatively to carry the good
word freedom, for colonial and other peoples,
into the chamber, realizing that the proceedings
of a world parliament are, quite naturally, fol-
lowed by the world.
(Copyright, 1946, N.Y. Post Syndicate)

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in the Daily Official Bul-
etin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to the Assistant to the President,
1021 Angell Hall, by 3:30 p. m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a. m. Sat-
urdays).
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1946
VOL. LVI, No. 78
Notices
Mid-Year Graduation Exercises
February 23
9:30 a.m., Assembly in Hill Audi-
torium (Academic Dress)
All Graduates will be seated in Sec-
tions II and III, Main Floor. Seating
will be under the direction of Mar-
shals.
Color Guard will assemble in Lobby,
first floor.'
Honor Guard will assemble in
Lobby, first floor.
Deans and Directors who take ac-
tive part in the exercises will assem-
ble in east dressing rooms, first floor.
Regents, Secretary, Minister, Speak-
er, President, and others of Honor
Section will assemble in west dressing
rooms, first floor.
Other Faculty Members will assem-
ble in second floor dressing rooms and
proceed informally to seats on the
stage.
The seating of the public will be
under the direction of ushers.
10:00 a.m., Opening Exercises.
Glenn L. Alt, Chief Marshal
The General Library, between
terms, will be closed evenings and
there will be no Sunday service.
The following schedule will be
maintained:
Saturday, Feb. 23, Saturday, March
2, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
The Divisional Libraries will be
open onl short schedules. Notices will
be posted on the doors.
Automobile Regulation: The Uni-
versity Automobile Regulation will be
lifted from Saturday noon, Feb. 16
until 8:00 a.m. Monday, Feb. 25 for
junior Medical students. For all
other University students, with the
exceptiori of freshman and sophomore
Medical students, the driving restric-
tions will be lifted for the period be-
ginning at 12:00 noon on Friday, Feb.
22 and ending at 8:00 a.m. on Mon-
day, March 4.
Faculty of College of Literature,
Science and the Arts: College of
Architecture and Design: School of
Education:School of Forestry and
Conservation: School of Music: and
School of Public Health:
Class lists for use in reporting Fall
Term grades of undergraduate stu-
dents enrolled in these imits, and also
graduate students in the schools of
Forestry and Conservation, Music,
and Public Health, were mailed Tues-
day, Feb. 12. Anyone failing to re-
ceive theirs should notify the Regis-
trar's Office, Miss Cuthbert, phone
308, and duplicates will be prepared
for them.
Corrected Closing Ilours For Women
Students: -
Closing hours during the examina-
tion period:-
Saturday, Feb. 16, 12:30 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 17, 11:00 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 18, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 19, 10:30 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 20, 10:30 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 21, 10:30 p.m.
Friday, Feb. 22, 12:30 a.m.
Saturday, Feb. 23, 12:30 a.m.
Sunday, Feb. 24, 11:00 p.m.
Closing hours during the orienta-
tion and registration periods:
Monday, Feb. 25, 11:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 26, 11:00 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 27, 11:00 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 28, 11:00 p.m.

Friday, March 1, 12:30 a.m.
Saturday, March 2, 12:30 a.m.
Sunday, March 3, 11:00 p.m.
Office of the Dean of Women
College of Engineering Registration
Material:
Students enrolled in the current
term should call for Spring Term
registration material at Room 244,
West Engineering Building, beginning
Feb. 18, from 9 to 12 a.m., and 1:30
to 4:30 p.m. In the case of persons
enrolled in the Refresher course, the
above applies only to those who are
former students in the College of En-
gineering.
W. J. Emmons, Secretary
Presidents of Women's Residence
Houses:
All signouts sheets from all houses
must be in the Judiciary Box in the
Undergraduate Office of the Michi-
gan League by Friday, Feb. 22.
Graduate Scholarships and Fellow-
ships for 1946-1947: Today is the last
day for filing applications for fellow-
ships and scholarships in the Gradu-
ate School for 1946-1947. Blanks may
be obtained in that office from 8:00
a.m., to 12:00 and from 1:30 to 4:30
p.m.
Announcement of Graduate Fel-
lowships and Management Training

Monday at 8 ......................... Thu., Feb.
" " 9 .......................... Sat., "
" "10.........................Fri.,"
, ~11......................... 'ues .,
s.,
Monday at 1.......................... Wed., Feb.
2 .............:............Mon.,
3 .......................... Thu., "
Tuesday at 8 ......... ........ ........Fri. Feb.
"."9.........................Wed.,"
" " 10 ........................... Tues.,
* * ' I1'....'.......'.............. Mon.,>
Tuesday at 1.......................... Sat., Feb.
2.......... ...............Thurs.,,
" " 3 .......................Tues "

21,
16,
22,
19,
20,
18.
21,
22,
20,
19,
18,
16,
21,

FALL TERM
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
February 16 to February 22, 1946
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time of
exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses
having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first quiz
period. Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. To avoid misunderstandings and errors,
each student should receive notification from his instructor of the
time and place of his examination. Instructors in the College of Liter-
ature, Science, and the Arts, are not permitted to change the time of
examination without the approval of the Examination Committee.
Time of Exercise Time of Examination

19, 2:00- 4:00

SPECIAL iPERIODS

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Political Science 1, 2, 51, 52 ....'.. ..:..
Chemistry 55 :......................... .
Speech 31, 32 ..........................T
French 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 61, 62, 91, 92, 153..T
English 1, 2 .......................:... .
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54 ................7
Botany 1 ..............................
Zoology 1 ...... ..... . . ..... . .. .,..
Sociology 51, 54 .......... . ........... . .

T
R
T
Z
ti
r

Sat., Feb.'
Mon., Feb.
Mon., Feb.
Mon., Feb.
Cues., Feb.
Cues., Feb.
Wed., Feb.;
Wed., Feb.;
Thu., Feb.
Fri., Feb.
Fri., Feb.

16,
18,
18,
18,
19
19,
20,
20,
21,
22,
22,

8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00

Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ......................
German 1, 2, 31, 32 .... ............:..

School of Business Administration
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Forestry and Conservation
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Music: Individual Instruction in Applied Music
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all ap-
plied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any
unit of the University. For time and place'of examinations, see bul-
letin board at the School of Music.
School of Public Health
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10 :00
8:00-10:00
10:30-x.2:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00

(REVISED)
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
February 16 to February 22, 1946

Note: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time of
exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses
having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first quiz
period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the ex-
amination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such
work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned ex-
amination periods must be reported for adjustment. See bulletin
board outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Building between Feb-
ruary l and February 7, for instruction. To avoid misunderstandings
and errors, each student should receive notification from his instructor
of the time and place of his appearance in each course during the pe-
riol February 16 to February 22.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of
the Classification Committee.

Time of Exercise
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
Monday (at 11
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3

Time of Examination

Thursday
Saturday
Friday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Monday
Thursday

(at
(at
(at
Tuesday (at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Friday
Wednesday
Tuesday
Monday
Saturday
Thursday
Tuesday
* Saturday
*Monday
* Monday
*Tuesday
*Wednesday
*Wednesday
*Thursday
*Friday

February
February
February
February
February
February
February
February
February
February
February'
February
February
February
February
February
February
February
February
February
February
February

21
16
22
19
20
18
21
22
20
19
18
16
21
19
16
18
18
19
20
20
21
22

10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
8-10
8-10
2- 4
8-10
8-10
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2- 4
2- 4
2- 4
2- 4
8-10
8-10
10:30-12:30
2- 4
8-10
2- 4
8-10
2- 4

E. M. 1, 2, C. E. 2, Draw. 1
Draw 3; Surv. 2 3
M. E. 1, 3; Draw. 2
Economics 53, 54
M. P. 2, 3, 4
Surv. 1, 2
EE. 2a
German, Spanish

*This may also be used as an irregular period, provided there is
no conflict with the regular printed schedule above.
A special examination schedule is provided for the prescribed V-12
courses.

BARNABY By Crockett Johnson
- Y'

Program at Radcliffe College: This is
a ten months program for young
women intending to work in person-
nel departments and other branches
of administration. It includes seven
months of class instruction and three
months full time apprentice work.
Radcliffe College offers a limited
number of fellowships of $500 and
$300 each for the year 1946-47.
The training program will start
T .i Q Tsiinn :i ma(

L ectures
Lecture Postponed - The Guthrie
McClintic lecture originally scheduled
for tonight on the Oratorical Asso-
ciation Lecture Course has been post-
poned until Friday, March 15.
Academic Notices
Geology 11-There will be no meet-
ing of the lecture on Friday, though
..44-n4-mn c amnn mmtrill moat a.. cnin a

But Mr. O'Maoley, Gus, the
Ghost, is still typing the - -

But we know that he WLL finish, Barnaby.
So, ask your friend, Jane, to report for
work. Before we give her lines to learn. /~

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