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January 29, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TS1MAT, J3ACTAft-V 29,1)4

TiHE~ A*IcH'iGiA& DAILY

Sextet Hopes

To Resume

Winning Ways

tk'

WE'RE PROUD OF 'EM!
Cagers Elated After OSU Win;
Badgers Are Next Opponents

Stickmnen Will Meet MeMaster;
Renfrew, Kuznier To Miss Tilt
By DES HOWARTH
Michigan's hockey team, twice defeated in games with the University
of Toronto last weekend, will attempt to get back into the win column
tonight when Coach Vic Heyliger's crew meets McMaster University's sextet
at 8 p.m. at the Coliseum.
Although the Maize and Blue winning streak was broken by Toronto
after Michigan had won eleven straight contests, the Wolverines returned
home determined to start all over again.

Thinclads To Open Season Saturday
Against Boilermakers, Ohio State

By BERNIE MEISLIN
Michigan's cagers displayed an air
of confidence as they went through
drills yesterday in the wake of their
62-46 upset over a strong Ohio State
quintet.
"I'm proud of the boys," said Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan, "They played a
fine, aggressive game. It would have
been difficult for any team in the
country to have beaten us the way
we looked Saturday night."
Two Weekends Away
It will be two weeks before Wolver-
ine hoop fans will get a chance to see
their surprising outfit in action again.
The hoopsters travel to Madison next
Saturday for a game with Wisconsin.
The following Saturday will find
Michigan at Champaign for a return
tilt with the Illini.
It will not be until February
11 that the Wolverines play again
on the'hardwood court of Yost Field
House. The Badgers return Michi-
gan's visit on that night.
Oosterbaan's charges have main-

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tamed a record of near invincibility
on their home court throughout the
season, defeating such highly rated
teams as Michigan State, Utah, Illi-
nois, Northwestern and Ohio State at
Ann Arbor. The only blemish on the
cagers hame record is a 67-58 over-
time loss at the hands of Indiana.
Fast Break Tells Tale
A review of the figures of Satur-
day night's upset victory reveals the
actual effectiveness of the fast break-
ing, close guarding game that Michi-
gan played against Ohio. In the first
half Michigan took 43 shots and
made 12. Ohio took 47 chances and
nine were successful.
In the second half Michigan. only
tried 34 field goals, but made good on
13 of them. USO was sadly ineffective
making but nine of 51 attempts.
In the free throw department the
figures showered much the same de-
gree of efficiency for both teams. The
Wolverines made 12 of 16 fouls while
Ohio missed seven of 17 gift tosses.
Snyder Is Disappointing
Individually, the most disappoint-
ing of the Buckeyes was Ray Snyder.
Snyder led his team in scoring with
16 points, but did not really begin to
click till late in the game when his
team was far in the rear. He mWade
only one of 15 attempted field goals
in the first half and five out of 21
tries in the second.
For the Maize and Blue John Mul-
laney exhibited the most sensational
return to form, scoring 18 points to
lead both teams in that department.
They week before against Northwest-
ern, Mullaney had been held score-
less

Michigan dropped a heart-breaker
to Toronto on Saturday after being
out-played by the powerful Blues on
Friday night. In the second contest
the Wolverines led until mid-way
through the third period, when the
Toronto attack completely wore down
the Michigan defense.
Al Renfrew andl Chet Kuznier will
not be available for duty in tonight's
game, which means that Coach Hey-
liger will have to do some juggling
with his second and third lines. Ren-
frew is suffering from a leg injury,
and Heyliger is saving him for the
Minnesota series this weekend. Kuz-
nier will be out until the Torontc
games in an attempt to catch up on
his academic work.
Gord MacMillan and Bill Jacobson
are expected to start on the Wolver-
ines' forward line, but the third mar
is as yet undecided. Clem Cossalter
and Connie Hill will be the defense-
men with Jack Maclnnes at goal.
Michigan's first line, with Wall3
Gacek at center, and Neil Celley and
Wally Grant on the wings remains
intact. Bob Arnot, Karl Sulentich
Dick Starrak, and Sam Steadmar
will probably all see action either or
the second or third line. Bob Marshal]
and Ross Smith will be the second
defense team.
Following tonight's game the W61-
verines will leave for Minneapolis or
Thursday for the final two gamf
series with the Golden Gophers

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M1atmen Prep
For Wisconsin
Dworsky's Win Gives
Wolverines Victory
Michigan's wrestling team, fresh
from its victory over Purdue, last
year's conference champs, is now
working hard for next week's meet
with Wisconsin, at Madison.
The most surprising win in Satur-
day's contest was the 2 point win of
Dan Dworsky, which gave the Wol-
verines the meet. Dworsky, who had
been out for the team for only 3
weeks, has been bothered by a cold,
and has only been able to partake in
a few of the practices. However, he
wrestled very well, and won the de-
ciding match for Michigan.
Commenting on Saturday's contest,
Coach Keen said, "I am very pleased
and satisfied with the performance of
this team. I have never had a team
like it, where I knew every man put
himself out in order to win. Without
any desire to take away credit from
this fine victory, I do recognize that
Purdue was at a psychological disad-
vantage, having just beaten a fine
Michigan State College team the pre-
ceding night, and was not set for the
kind of scrap that we managed to
give, them."

Coach Termis Meet
O re of Year's fBest
By WALT KLEE
Michigan's track team will pry the
lid open on its 1946 season this Sat-
urday night in a triangular meet
against Purduenand Ohio State to be
held in the Yost Field House.
With the exception of Ohio State
which came out on the short end of
a 68-50 score in a meet with Michigan
State last Saturday it will be the first
appearance of the season for the
teams.
"One Of The Best"
Coach Ken Doherty said of the
coming meet, "It will be one of the
best meets to be seen here all sea-
son. Purdue has the best team they
have had in years and Ohio State
may pull a few surprises."
The Boilermakers will bring one of
the strongest teams in the Big Ten
in the field events. Bill Bangert,
singing shot put star, has already
topped the existing Field House mark
of 51 ft. 52 in. set by Michigan's Bill
Watson in 1939. In the Army Relays
last Saturday he recorded a toss of
52 ft. 4 3,18 in. in finishing behind
Army's Dewitt Coulter.
New Purdue Mark
Dick Kilpatrick has set a new Pur-
due record in the high jump of 6 ft.'
4 in. in time trials earlier this month.
Bob Murphy and Dick Whitmore
have both cleared 12 feet in the pole
vault.
The Boilermakers have also shown
that they are comparable to the Wol-
verines in most of the track events.
Cy Highlander and Jim Parierd have
both run the 60 yard dash in .06:4.
Coach Homer Allen's squad has also

shown strength in the quarter and
half-mile events with Don Weber
and Hank Miller turning in times of
53 seconds in the shorter distance.

Mermen Face
MSC Saturday
Buckeye Swimmers
Outclass Great Lakest
With their third straight victory
and the second in Conference ac-7
tion over Purdue safely tucked
away, Michigan's swimmers will=
vacation from Big Ten play this
Saturday night when they oppose
Michigan State's strong squad at
East Lansing.
The Spartans also clashed with
Purdue this past week-end, rolling up
a 57-27 count over the outclassed
Boilermakers Friday. Michigan's
margin of triumph Saturday was
49-32; but Coach Matt Mann kept his
aces, Dick Weinberg out of the 50 and
100-yard freestyle races, and Matt
Mann, II,, out of the 440-yard free-
styl event.
The Wolverine 300-yard medley re-
lay team of Willard Metcalf, Bob
Matters and Jay Sanborn left the
Boilermakers far behind in the event
only to be disqualified. The Maize
and Blue finished with a good 20-
yard margin.
Down at Columbus, O., the Buck-
eyes of Ohio State proved their
caliber by completely outclassing
the powerful Great Lakes swim-
ming team, 52-32. Earlier this
year Michigan and the Bluejackets
split a pair of decisions, the Wol-
verines' best effort being a 46-38
win over the Navy team.
Only three events went the way of
the Sailors and Wally Ris was respon-
sible for two of them. He whipped
the Ohio State freestyle sprint star
from Hawaii, Halo Hirose, in both the
50- and 100-yard races, but had to
post a very fast :52 to win the hun-
dred.
I-M SCHEDULE
RESIDENCE
Tonight
8:00 Wenley vs. Baldwint
Fletcher vs. Lockwood
Greene vs. Tyler
INDEPENDENT
Tomorrow
7:00 Che-Mets vs. F. B. I.
Latin Wolves vs. Division St.
A. C.
Forestry Club vs. Bus. Ad.
8:00 Ship's Co. vs. Semper Five
Rangers vs. Jr. Birdmen
PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITY
9:00 Xi Psi Phi vs. Alpha Omega
Delta Sigma Delta vs. Nu Sig-
ma Nu
Alpha Chi Sigma vs. Alpha
Kappa Kappa
Phi Chi vs. Phi Rho Sigma
FRATERNITY "A"
Thursday
7:00 Phi Sigma Delta vs. Zeta Beta
Tau
8:00 Chi Phi vs. Sigma Phi Ep-
silon

REPLACEMENT? ... Bob Thom-
ason is one of the distance pros-
pects that may replace the Hume
twins on the track squad.
TYPEWRITERS
Bought, Rented
Repaired
STUDENT and
OFFICEESUPPLIES
0. D. MORRILI
314 S. State St. Phone W613

"FF RE KEYBOARD
By MARY LU REATH
Associate Sports Editor
Today's column was written by Des Howarth, Daily hockey writer, who accom-
panied the Michigan puck team to Toronto
FANS WHO ARE bemoaning the fact that Michigan's hockey team
finally dropped from the ranks of the undefeated need shed no
tears. Coach Vic Heyliger's sextet lost twice to the University of Toronto,
it's true, but even so the Wolverines played two of the best games they
have played this season, and once again proved that it takes a really
great team to beat them. And from all indications, the chances are
pretty good that the young Michigan sextet will turn the tables the next
time they meet the Torontonians in February.
Michigan still has a real hockey club, make no mistake about that. Those
who optimistically hoped for an undefeated season, however, failed to take
into account the quality of the Wolverines' opponents. Never before has a
Maize and Blue sextet faced such competition as this season. Yet until the
Toronto series, Michigan conquered all opposition, including Colorado
College and Minnesota, two of the best puck squads in the United States.
Toronto, however, was a different proposition. The Blues are coached by
one of the best in the business, Ace Bailey, and they have an experienced
team. The average age of the Toronto team is four years older than that
of the Wolverines, and in Canada that means four more years of learning
to play hockey.
THE UNIVERSITY of Toronto has also been playing some very strong
opponents this season, and in the vicinity of Canada's Queen City may
be found some of the best hockey squads in the hockey-minded dominion.
The fact that Michigan gave the Blues their biggest test of the season
is admitted by the hockey-wise Mr. Bailey, who also says that his team
is the best college aggregation he has ever coached. This certainly speaks
well for the Wolverines, even in defeat.
The main reason for Michigan's defeats may be attributed to Wally
Halder, Toronto's ace center. The Maize and Blue probably will not meet
a better forward than Halder this season. Previous to the series he had
scored at least four goals in every contest. Michigan was only able to cut
that to three. Halder is fast, stick-handles well, and has a terrific shot.
Several National Hockey League teams have already asked for his signature
to play for the pro ranks. It will be well worth the price of admission for
Ann Arbor fans just to see Halder perform when he and his mates
come here for games next month.
THEN, too, the breaks played an important part in the double loss. Before
the series opener the Michigan squad worked out at the Varsity Arena
in Toronto, and at the time the team remarked that the ice was much
slower than that of the Coliseum. It was obvious that this factor played
an important part in the double loss. The Wolverines tired quickly in
Friday's game, and wore themselves out in the last period of Saturday's
contest.
Two goals were protested by the Wolverines and these ultimately
proved the deciding margin in the 7-5 defeat. Jacq MacInnes caught a
rifle shot off the stick of Kryzansowski but the goal official ruled that Jack's
hand crossed the line. Later Toronto scored again after the Wolverines
thought the whistle had blown, stopping the play. These breaks had a de-
moralizing effect on the squad.
had thought the whistle had blown, stopping the play. These breaks had
Coach Heyliger and his boys are not going to take the reverses lying down.
Everyone on the squad believes they will be able to take the Toronto sextet
on Michigan's Coliseum ice. It will not be a bit surprising if they do.

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