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January 25, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

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FRIDUfAY. ANUARY 2,1949l~

1 11 1 J I V A 4 11 A k y L IA III J l IM A L A I
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U.S. Guinea Pig Ships Pacific
Bound for Atom Bomb Test;
UNO Creates Control Body

Fleet of 97 To Include Veteran German,
Jap Vessels in Three-Phase Experiment

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24-Ships of
the United States Navy's guinea pig
fleet already are westbound in the Pa-
cific for a test to determine what the
atomic bomb has done to sea power.
This became known today as Vice
Admiral W. H. P. Blandy announced
detailed plans for a three-phase test
of the world's most destructive weap-
on against this nation's traditional
"first line of defense."
The target fleet of 97 vessels -.
not all of them yet en route-will
include some famous veterans of
American naval action as well as a
sampling of the navies of Germany
and Japan.
With supporting ships for obser-
vation, supply and transportation.
these vessels will constitute "Joint
Task Force One," an operation in
which the Army, the Army Air
Forces and the Manhattan Projectl
(the military custodians of the atomic
bomb) will participate.
It .Will, Blandy told the Senate':
Atomic Energy Investigating Com-
mittee, be designated by the word
"crossroads."
The target fleet will include four
American battleships, including the
veterans Nevada and Pennsyl-.
vania; two heavy cruisers; two air-'
craft carriers, the old Saratoga and
the modern Independence; 16 de-

stroyers; five submarines; the Jap-
anese battleship Nagato and light
cruiser Sakawa, and the German
heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen.
The first test, scheduled for early
May, will be an atomic burst several
hundred feet above target ships; a
second test, tentatively scheduled for
July 1, will be a surface level explo-
sion among assembled ships; the
third, which cannot be made this
year, will be a deep water test in the
open sea..
Site of the initial tests will be
Ikini Atoll, in the Marshall group,
with the aiming point a lagoon
about 30 fathoms deep, 27 miles
long and about 15 miles wide.
The mission, Blandy said, is "pri-
marily to determine the effects of the
artomic bombupon naval vessels in
order to gain information of value to
the national defense. The ultimate
┬░esults of the tests so far as the Navy
is concerned will be their translation
into terms of U. S. sea power.
The bomb used will be the "Naga-
saki type" bomb, Blandy said in an-
3wer to another question. The bomb
ased on Nagasaki, second of the two
lropped on Japanese targets, reput-
adly was considerably more powerful
and efficient than the initial explo-
sive used at Hiroshima.

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FALL TERM
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
February 16 to February 22, 1946
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time of
exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses
having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first quiz
period. Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. To avoid misunderstandings and errors,
each student should receive notification from his instructor of the
time and place of his examination. Instructors in the College of Liter-
ature, Science, and the Arts, are not permitted to change the time of
examination without the approval of the Examination Committee.

C
Issues in Indonesia,
Iran To Be Decided
By The Associated Press
LONDON, Jan. 24-The United
Nations today created a commission
to control atomic energy for peace,
while the security council prepared
to tackle grave political issues in
Iran, Indonesia and Greece, and pos-
sibly even in a fourth area-Lebanon.
First Decisive Action
In its first decisive action on a ma-
jor world issue, the General Assembly
of 51 nations created an Atomic E-
ergy Control Commission hailed by
U. S. Secretary of State James F.
Byrnes as necessary to save the world
from an atomic armaments race.
Lebanese premier Badaouy Pacha
announced in Beyrouth that he had
cabled his country's UNO delegation
to ask the Security Council to review
the British-French agreement on
withdrawal of troops, and to inter-
cede forthe immediate evacuation of
foreign troops.
Consider Soviet Changes
The council agreed earlier to con-
sider the Soviet charges of British
military "interference" in Greece and
Indonesia, and similar accusations by
Iran against Russia.
A possibility that other cases might
come before the security council was
hinted during a meeting of the 14-
member assembly steering commit-
tee. Soviet delegate Andrei Gromy-
ko said his delegation had received
"highly interesting" communications
from the Congress Party of India and
President Soekarno of Indonesia, and
said the Assembly should take note
of these messages even if no action
was envisaged.
MYDA ...
(Continued from Page 1)
ways which its members consid-
ered consistent with democracy. It
recently protested American mili-
tary intervention in China and cir-
culated petitions around campus
on this matter. MYDA members
also worked on the campaign con-
ducted by the Committee for Lib-
eral Action to send petitions to
Congress demanding action on a
permanent FEPC.
AYD is an inter-racial, inter-faith
organization whose program includes
support of labor in its current dis-
putes and help to build the American
labor movement. On the national
front it fights for jobs, for security
and against fascistic elements in
America.
Unity with youth of all lands to
preserve peace and destroy fascism is
the keynote of AYD's international
program. It supports a strong United
Nations Organization. Molly Lieber,
of the University of Chicago, repre-
sented AYD as a delegate to the
World Federation or Democratic
Youth in London last year.
MYDA's present plans include a
project to help bring non-veteran
students closer to veteran problems.
It plans to explain and support
veterans' demands for legislation
on bonuses and housing. Arrange-
ments are underway to carry out
this program in cooperation with
VO and AVC.

Easiest Exam
We Ever Took
The constant stream of blue-
books around this time of year
imposesa definite strain on the
mind, as evidenced by the follow-
ing conversation overheard in one
of the girls' dorms.
First Coed: "I'm going to spend
the whole weekend studying for
that Ec bluebook."
Second coed (obviously bleary-
eyed after studying for three psych
exams and a French bluebook):
"Ec-Ec, when can I possibly study
for Ec?" After frantically beating
her head against the wall for some
Sminutes, she stood still while her
face lit up with a smile of relief.
"But I don't take Ec!"
Breakey Must
Justify Action
Imo. Court Case
Circuit Judge James R. Breakey,
the one man Grand Jury investigat-
ing an alle'ged million dollar gambling
racket in Washtenaw County will be
required to show cause why a writ of
habeus corpus should be denied Wil-
liam E. Mahaley, now serving 60 days
in Washtenaw County jail for con-
tempt of court in the Grand Jury
hearing.
County Sheriff John Osborne will
also be required to show cause for
this, and to explain the restraints
whereby Mahaley's lawyer was denied
the right to see him in County Jail.
Local lawyers claim it's easier to
see a man held on a murder charge
than to see their clients held in
County Jail for contempt in the cur-
rent Grand Jury investigation. If
cause is not shown, right of entry
will be established.

CLASSIFIE D ADVE TISiNG

Insight' Will
Stress Student
Government
Articles Call for
Strong Campus Voice
The problem of student government
will be the theme of the first issue
of a new magazine edited by the
Student Religious Association.
Joyce Siegan, editor, and President
of S.R.A., stresses the need for stu-
dents to become literate and vocal
about public as well as campus af-
fairs in her editorial "The Campus:
A Laboratorydfor Democracy." Ray
Dixon answers questions such as why
have student government, why aren't
present student organizations suf-
ficient, and what must be done to
initiate proposed changes.
Robert Taylor states the value of
student participation in curriculum
shaping in his article "The Stu-
dent: Guinea Pig or Campus Citi-
zen."
The importance and purpose of stu-
dent initiative groups in training for
effective democratic action is the
point made by Wayne Saari, Pres-
ident of S.O.I.C. in his editorial "The
Nuclei of the Student Body." The,
veteran student opinion and the ob-
jectives of the Veterans International
Student Exchange Committee is dis-
cussed by Homer Underwood.
Besides these numerous editorials
and articles based on student gov-
ernment, a copy of the Constitution
for the University student govern-
ment will be printed in full. "In-
sight" will go on sale February 3.

By The Associated Press
BOMBAY, Jan. 24,-Police battled
sporadically tonight with bands of
demonstrators who had thrown up
flaming barricades earlier in riots in;
Bombay, and the toll in two days of
bloody fighting mounted to 14 killed
and at least 500 injured.
Police fired again today on the
demonstrators, and the provincial in-
formation office in a statement to-
night declared the situation remained
"very dangerous."
Qualified observers predicted the
riots would reach a peak by Saturday,
when the Indians will celebrate the
16th anniversary of the Indian Na-
tional Congress declaration of inde-
pendence. Police officials said it
seemed certain troops woul[ be called,
if the rioting continues.
A mob attacked the Khandiwadi
police station in the latest incident.
Today's injured included seven of-
ficers and 56 men of the police force,
mostly hurt by rocks and bottles
thrown by demonstrators. One man
was killed when police fired on a
mob attempting to interfere with a
fire engine enroute to a blaze.
In one residential section, virtually
all roads were blocked by rioters who
hurled stones on roadways to make
them impassable, cut down trees and
burned them as blazing barricades.

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK, Jan. 24-A prequis-
ite for political unity in India is abol-
ishment of the British-imposed re-
striction which prevents Moslems and
Hindus from voting for each other in
a general election, says Dr. K. A.
Hamied. a Moslem member of the In-
dian Legislative Council.
Dr. Hamied, now concluding a visit
to the United States as leader of a
group of Indian chemists on a mis-
sion to study new American methods
of research and manufacturing, said
in an interview that this election re-
striction. established as part of the
election laws of 1909, serves "to keep
India divided as a government."
The scientist, President of the
Indian Chemical Manufacturers'
Association, termed as false the im-
pression that Moslems and Hindus
"cannot get along together." As
evideiwe, lie said that although the
majc'rity of members in his associ-
ation were Hindus "they unani-
mously named me, a Moslem, to be
their president."
Regarding Indian politics, Dr.
Hamied said "not true represenation
of the wishes of the Indian people
can be realized as long as Moslems
must vote only for Moslems and Hin-
dus only for Hindus."
lIe cited an example: "A Hindu
wants to be elected. He knows he can-
not by law have support from any
Moslem. No Moslem, no matter how
highly his views are regarded, is per-
mitted to vote for him. When elected,
he naturally will devote his efforts
to the welfare of the Hindus. Polit-
ically, he cannot do otherwise. So he
stands against the Moslem and the
Moslem against him."
"India has asked for indepen-
dence," said Dr. Hamied. "But first
she must have internal unity and pur-
pose. If this voting restriction were
removed, I believe that a large de-
gree of unity-excepting those minor
skirmishes that always will exist
where there are so many millions of
people with so many millions of in-
dividual ideas-can be approached."
TEACHERS
WANTvED
ELIMENTARY: Scores, of vacancies
in highest salary schedule paying
cities, where you know you will get
ajrase_ eAch year.-N.Y., Mich., Calif.,
and others. Supervisors of all kinds
are in demand.
SECONDARY: All subjects-Nation-
wide coverage- Demand heavy.
COLLEGE: English, 'Social Set., Phys.
Ed., Science, Engineering, and all
others - Colleges are booming. Va-
cancies are numerous for teachers
with Masters and Doctors degrees.
For quick placement give telephone
and qualifications.
CLINE TEACHERS AGENCY
East Lansing, Michigan

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in the Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to allnmem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent in typewritten
form to thet assistant to the President,
1021 Angell Hall, by 3:30 p. m. on the day
preceding publication (11:00 a. m. Sat-
urdays).

CLASSIFIED
RATES

$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
WANTED TO RENT

Bombay Riots Flare;
Law Creates Schism
Death 1Tw Mouiats iRdian Leader Asks
To 14 in Two Days Volinig Rule Change

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25,
VOL. LVI 60

1946

'N
M.

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

Ma
Ma:
Tu
Tu

anday at 8 ......................... Thu., Feb.
S 9 ...........................Sat.,
9 x, 10 .......................... F ri.,
" " 11.........................Tues., "
rnday at 1........................Wed.,Feb.
t to 2 .......... . .. ... .. .. . ... M on .,
" $" 3 ......................... Thu., ",
esday at 8 .........................Fri. Feb.
" " 9 ...........................Wed.,
"o "o 10 ........................... Tues.,
"f11 ........................... M on.,"
esday at 1. ...................... Sat., Feb.
2........................Thurs.,

21, 10:30-12:30
16, 10:30-12:30
22, 8:00-10:00
19, 8:00-10:00
20, 2:00- 4:00
18. 8:00-10:00
21, 8:00-10:00
22, 10:30-12:30
20, 10:30-12:30
19, 10:30-12:30
18, 2:00- 4:00
16, 2:00- 4:00
21, 2:00- 4:00
19, 2:00- 4:00

Notices
Thefts from University - During
the post few days a microscope and
two mviftig picture projectors have
been stolen from the University. Will
each staff member having property in
his custody please use the greatest
possible diligence in safeguarding
University and private property
stored in the quarters under his juris-
diction. In addition to the loss in-
volved, replacements may, at this
time, be impossible.
Losses should be immediately re-
ported to Mr. Herman Greve in the
Business Office.
Herbert G. Watkins
Secretary
School of Education Faculty: The
January meeting of the faculty will
be held on Monday, Jan. 28, in the
University Elementary School Li-
brary. The meeting will convene at
4:15 p.m.

3.......................Tues
SPECIAL PERIODS
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Political Science 1, 2, 51, 52 .............Sat.,

" 1

WANTED TO RENT: ROOM by full-
time University employee. Garage
is desirable but not vital. Walter,
Phone 5539.
WANTED TO RENT: Apartment or,
house, two or three bedrooms.
Three adults, one-year-old child.
W. J. Mason, 23-24-1.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST : Gold graduation ring near
Hill and State. Initials M.L.S. in-
side. Great sentimental value. Re-
ward. Ph. 4121. Exchange 106.
BULOVA watch lost at State Theatre
or between theater and Union.
Tuesday afternoon. Reward. Call
9228.
LOST: A gold link bracelet last Sat-
urday night between Jordan and
Wenley House. Reward. Call Joan
Pinney, 2-4561.
LOST: Loglog slide rule, black case.
Name R. E. Foote in flap. Call Rob
ert Foote, Ypsilanti 1170-J or Rob-
ert Hopps, 306 Greene House. Re-
ward.
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Weekdays 30c to 5 P.M.
- Today and Saturday -
Chock- Full z
Talent!
NEWV
t:'SONGS! ;<>

LOST: Parker 51, black with gold top
on or near Diagonal Monday after-
noon. Reward. Pat Haley, 2-5671.
LOST: S.A.E. pin Saturday night be-
tween Martha Cook, Metzger's,
Swift's and Library. Reward. Call
Dorothy Upham, Martha Cook,
2-3225.
LOST: Waterman pen, between
chemistry building and State street.
Contact Gloria Katlan, phone
2-3369. Reward.
LOST: A small gold identification
bracelet engraved Gerry. Finder
please call Helen Newberry Resi-
dence, 2-2591. Reward.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Bicycle, Schwinn "New
World" good condition. John Buet-
tner-Janusch, 321 E. Liberty, Apt. 5
NATURAL. muskrat coat -I size 14,
good condition, call 24097
SERVICING and REPAIRING
HAVE your typewriters, adding ma-
chines, .calculators repaired. Work
guaranteed. Office equipment serv-
ice, 1111 South 4th Ave., Ph. 2-1213.
TYPING
EXPERT TYPIST wants work. Term
papers, thesis, notes, and generalI
typing. All work neatly done. 7337.

BUDAPEST QUA R TET .
SI XT H A N NUA L C HAMB ER M USIC F EST IVA L

Chemistry 55 ..........................
Speech 31, 32 ..........................
French 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 61, 62, 91, 92, 153. .
English 1, 2 ...........................'
,Economics 51, 52, 53, 54........... ..
Botany 1 ...........................
Zoology 1 .............................
Sociology 51, 54 .......................

Mon.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Wed.,
Thu.,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.

16,
18,
18,
18,
19,
19,
20,
20,
21,
22,
22,

8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12::30
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00.
8:00-10:00
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00

Women Students:
23, women students
equipment from the
letic Building must
(continued on

Beginning Jan.
taking athletic
Women's Ath-
show Student
Page 4)

I,.

.

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

II

Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32.................Fri.,
German 1, 2, 31, 32 ....................Fri.,

Iif

if

r1

School of Business Administration
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Forestry and Conservation
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.
School of Music: Individual Instruction in Applied Music
Individual examinations by appointment will be given for all ap-
plied music courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any
unit of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bul-
letin board at the School of Music.
School of Public Health
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

FRI., JAN. 25, 1946
8:00-News.
8:15-Meet the Band.
8:25-Women Today.
8:55-News.
9:00-Music Box.
9:30-Popular Music.
9:40-News.
9:45-Moments of Melodies.
10:00-News.
10:05-Music for Remem-
brance.
10:15-Quiz
10:30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Community Calendar.
10:45-Waltz Time.
11 :00-News.

11:05-Al & Lee Reiser.
11:15-Lean Back & Listen.
11:30-Farm & Home Hour.
11:55-College & Martial
Airs.
12:00-News.
12:15-Jesse Crawford.
12:20-Today's Band.
12:30-Along the Sports
Sidelines.
12:45-Man on the Street.
1:00-News.
1:05-Salon Music.
1:10-Organ Music (Pop.)
1:15-South American Way.
1:30-woody Herman
1:45-Dinah Shore

2:05-Hal Saunders.
2:15-Melody on Parade.
3:00-News.
3:05-Arthur Chapman.
3:15-University of Michi-
gan.
3:30-It's a Hit
3:40-It Actually Happened.
3:45-Little Show
4:00-News.
4:15-Dance Music
4:30-Spotlight on the Stars
4:45-Quiz
5:00--News
y 5y05-Music
5:15--Mystery Melodies

2:00--News.

I

JOSEF ROISMANN BORIS KROYT
Violin Viola

EDGAR OR TENBERG
Violin

MISCHA SCHNEIDER
ViQIOwcl -

i i

Friday Evening, January 25, 8:30

Today

MICHIGAN

30c until
5 o'clock

4
s
f
f

i

ART CINEMA LEAGUE presents
OSA JOHNSON'S
"B BOONA"
Adventuring in the darkest Africa with the farnous explorer.

Critics Label This a Fine Mystery Film
"MY NAM E
IS
JULIA ROS"

Quartet in 1) minor, Op, 76, No.
Quartet in E-flat major (1943)
Quartet in E-flat major, Op. 74

2 ,. . . . khAYDN
. .. zIr NCE -T.
B~ETHIOVEN

Saturday Afternoon, Januory 26, 2:30
Quartct in F major, K. 590 . . . . .
Quartet No. 12 . . . . . . . . . . .

III

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SclluIBv13ER'

(QUIartct '1 iMjn- .) ). 1 61

V Plus
11\ *Um - m k " 1 1 m N I

"Smooth -
"Professional

engrossing - lively" - P.M.
Murder Mystery" - N.Y. Sun
..(:-I . ,1* - ,: .51 Klit / A - - -- - -

Saturday Evening, January 26, 8:30
Quart tr c in A major, Op. 18, No. 5
Quartet . . . . . . . . .
Quartet in E1i(t naj.r, Op. 51 . . .

hi-i i ivrN
PIS [rON
D~VORAK

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. . . .

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