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January 20, 1946 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Quartet To Present Concerts;
Bj oerlit To Open Festival
Will Play Program Mozart's Requiem
Of Chamber Music Will Be Presented

Appearing for the second consecu-
,tive season, the Budapest String
Quartet, internationally famous in-
terpreters of chamber music, will pre-
sent three concerts next Friday and
Saturday. in the Rackham Lecture
Hall.
The quartet, which first became
prominent in the United States
about fifteen years ago, is com-
posed of Josef Roismann, first vio-
lin; Edgar Ortenberg, second vio-
lin; Boris Kroyt, viola; and Mischa
Schneider, violin'cello.
Selections by Hindemith, Mil-
haud, Piston and Schubert will
higl ght the Sixth AnnualrCham-
ber Music Festival.
The extensive "travels of the quar-
tet have not been limited to Europe
and America. On several occasions
they have journeyed to the East In-
dies, Australia and New Zealand.
Contemporary American Chamber
music is included in the extensive
repertoire of the Budapest. Quartets
by Carpenter, Barber, Nabokov and
Jacobi are frequently performed on
their programs.
A limited number of tickets for the
series or for individual concerts are
available at the University Musical
Society office in Burton Tower.
Pianist Will
Play Original
Compsition.
Highlighting the recital by Mrs.
Roberta Dresden, pianist, at 8:30
p.m., Thursday in the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre, will be an original
composition, "Introduction, Fugue,
and Variations" and "Allegro molto
e dinamico" from Piano Sonata,
(1834-36) by Hunter Johnson.
The program will also include
"Partita No. 5 in G major" by Bach,
Mozart's "Fantasy No. 2 in C minor,
K. 396," "Allegro inquieto (from
Sonata No. 7, Op. 83)" by Serge Pro-
kofleff, and the Beethoven "Sonata in
C minor."
The recital is being presented in
partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the degree of Bachelor of
Music.
Mrs. Johnson Will
Give Piano Recital
.Mrs. Mary Evans Johnson, pianist,
will present a recital in partial ful-
fillment of the degree of Bachelor of
Music at 8:30 p.m. today in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
The program will consist of "Prel-
ude and Fugue in C-sharp minor" by
Bach, "Rondo in C-major, Op. 2,
No. 3" by Beethoven, "Four Pieces
from the Kreisleriana, Op. 16" byI
Schumann, and "Sonata" by Griffes.
Book Contains;
Outfit's fistory
Awaiting all 9th Air Force veteransl
on campus, and free for the asking, is
a colorful book containing over 60
water-color paintings giving the his-
tory of their outfit from Egypt, acrossI
Africa to Europe, winding up in Ger-
many.
These "on the spot" paintings were
made by Maj. William Max, a gradu-
ate of the University of Illinois, at
the request of the Army Air Forces.
The printing of over 140,000 copies is
being undertaken in France. Already
40,000 have been made up and dis-
tributed.
These books are exclusively for 9th
Air Force veterans and can be ob-

The first six programs in the 53rd
annual May Festival, featuring the
Philadelphia Orchestra under Eu-
gene Ormandy, will be presented by
Jussi Bjoerling, Swedist tenor, at 8:30
p.m. Thursday, May 2, in Hill Audi-I
torium. He will perform several fa-
vorits arias.
Mozart's Requiem
The 300-voice University Choral
Union and soloists Ruth Diehl, so-
prano, Jean Watson, contralto, Wil-
liam Hain, tenor, and Nicola Mos-
cona, bass, under the direction of
Prof. Hardin Van Deursen, will be
heard in Mozart's "Requiem" on the
first half of the Friday night concert.
Nathan Milstein, violinist, will
complete the program with Alexander
Hilsberg, associate conductor, and the
orchestra.
American folk songs and Negro
spirituals will head the list of attrac-
tions on Saturday, May 4. The Youth
Chorus, under the direction of Miss
Marguerite Hood, and Anne Brown,
soprano, are the performers sched-
uled for the 2:30 p.m. concert.
Sayao To Sing
Classical songs and South Ameri-
can arias on Bidu Sayao's program
will be features at the fourth concert
Saturday night. The orchestra will
also present several selections.
The musical season will reach its
climax with the final concerts on
Sunday, May 5. William Kapell,
noted young pianist, will be the solo-
ist while Hilsberg will conduct. Sal-
vatore Baccaloni, famous Metropoli-
tan basso buffo, will highlight the
evening's performance. Prokofieff's
"Alexander Nevsky" featuring con-
tralto Rosalind Nadell and the
Choral Union, will conclude the Fes-
tival.
y Victory Bonds!

Coomaraswamy
Will Lecture
AtRackham
"Riddle of Sphinx in
Greece" To Be Topic
Dr. Ananda K. Coomaraswamy,
Fellow for Research in Indian, Per-1
sian and Mohammadan Art at thel
Boston Museum of Fine Arts, will
speak in the University Lecture Ser-
ies on "The Riddle of the Sphinx"
with special emphasis on the Sphinx
in Greece at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday in
Rackham Amphitheatre under the
auspices of the Institute of Fine Arts.
Advisory Editor of Ars Islamica,
Dr. Coomaraswamy is a leading au-
thority in the field of Oriental Art
and outstanding scholar in compara-
tive symbolism, metaphysics, folklore,
philosophy and religion.
Dr. Coomaraswamy will be guest
of honor at an informal reception to
be given by Prof. James M. Plumer
and Mrs. Plumer and the Far Eastern
Art students in the Far Eastern Art
Room, Alumni Memorial Hall from
8 to 10 p.m. Tuesday.
The Student Religious Association
has invited Dr. Coomaraswamy to
lectue at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the
Rackham Amphitheatre. His topic
will be "The Religious Basis of India
Society." A reception, sponsored by
SRA and the Indian Student Society
will be held in Lane Hall following
the lecture.
Liberal Group
Chooses Roxas
MANILA, Jan. 19-(P)-Manuel
Roxas was nominated for the presi-
dency of the Philippines today by the
liberal wing of the Nacionalista Party
and immediately accepted in a speech
critical of President Osmena, his ex-
pected opponent in the April 4 elec-
tion.
Roxas and Osmena, long friends
and political allies, finally split of-
ficially last month.

University Radio Programs
The University of Michigan Broadcasting Service will broadcast
the following programs for the week of Jan. 21 to Jan. 27.
MONDAY:
Station WKAR
2:30 p.m. U of M STUDENTS QUIZ THEIR PROFESSORS
OF EDUCATION
"What Next" Program by University High School
students. Arranged by Mr. Sydney Straight, Teacher
of English
2:45 p.m. COMMUNITY IN ACTION
"Milan-A Community in Action"
Irma Herman, Youth Worker, interviewed by Mrs.
Matilda Rubin of the Staff of the Adult Education
Program.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. CAMPUS NEWS
Prepared by Cleland Wylie of the University News
Service.
TUESDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
"Every Year the Same Thing" by Luck Chase Stephenson
WEDNESDAY:
Station WKAR
2:00 p.m. to 2:30:p.m.. EPOCHS IN MUSIC
Music in Germany in the Early Classic Era.
Directed by Hanns Pick.
2:30 p.m. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
"The Veteran's Misunderstanding of G.I. Insurance"
Ward Peterson, guest speaker.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIES
"The Common Causes of Diarrhea"
Dr. H. Marvin Pollard.
THURSDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE UNIVERSITY CARILLON
Played by Mr. Sydney Giles.
Station WJR
11:15 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIES
"Some Comolications of Pregnancy"
Dr. Reynold L. Haas, Instructor in Obstetrics and
Gynecology.
FRIDAY:
Station WKAR
2:30 p.m. THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
Student-written, student-enacted radio plays.
Directed by Professor David Owen.
2:45 p.m. WORKER'S EDUCATION SERIES
Debate of the Full Employment Bill before Congress.
Martin Shapero (negative); John Condylis (af-
firmative). Both of the Law School.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. DOROTHY ORNEST, Soprano.
SATURDAY:
Station WJR
2:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. STUMP THE PROFESSOR
Basic Panel: Randolph Adams, Director of the
Clements Library of American History; Arthur Hack-
ett, Professor of Voice in the school of music: George
Kiss, Professor of Geography; Amos Morris, Profes-
sor of English, and Frank Robbins, Assistant to the
President.

Strikee...
(Continued from Page 1)
Schwellenbach last night invited the
presidents of General Electric and
Westinghouse Electric Companies to
meet him Tuesday in the capital to
discuss a dispute which last Tuesday
sent 175,000 United Electrical Work-
ers (CIO) off their jobs with three
companies, including GE and West-
inghouse. General Motors electrical
appliance plants, which also were in-
volved in the UE dispute, were not
included in the Schwellenbach invi-
tation.
The UE walkout involved a $2 a
day wage increase demand.
The nation's belt tightening walk-
out of 263,000 CIO anl AFL meat in-
dustry workers was deadlocl:ed in its
fifty day, with no developments ex-
pected until a government fact-find-
ing board opens public hearings in
Chicago Tuesday.
Packinghouse workers were seek-
ing wage increases of 1712 cents
hourly, as compared with the highest
company offer of 10 cents.
Two other walkouts scheduled for
Monday included 30,000 members of
the CIO-Farm equipment workers
who sought a 30 per cent wage in-
crease at 11 plants of the Interna-
tional Harvester Company, and 5,000
employes of three Utah metals com-
panies at which members of the mine,
mill and smelter workers (CIO)
sought to bring wages into line with
similar work scales in Idaho.

Zoologists Will
Hear Lecture
By Dr. Ger-ard
Dr. Ralph W. Gerard, professor of
physiology at the University of Chi-
cago, will address the Zoology depart-
ment on electrical phenomena in tho
nervous system at 4:15 p.m. tomor,-
row and will speak on "A Biologist's
View of Society" at 8 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Dr. Gerard, who holds both tho
Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of
Philosophy degrees, bears the coveted
star after his name in American Men
of Science, indicating that he i3 re-
garded by his colleaguei as being
among the top thousand men of sci-
ence in all fields whose contributions
are of primary importance. Dr. Ger-
ard has studied in Europe under the
auspices of a National Research
Council fellowship.
Dr. Gerard's lectures are being
jointly sponsored by the Department
of Zoology and Phi Sigma, honorary
natural science fraternity, and are
open to the public. A reception will
be given for members of the Zoology
department and the Phi Sigma so-
ciety and their guests following the
evening lecture.
Buy Victo ry.Bonds!

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ICLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

VflLENTINE S /
Don't chance forgetting
favorite friends or relatives -/
n the last-minute rush.
Select your Valentines now!
A
FRANCISCO-BOYCE PHOTO CO.
723 North University
- --

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one of two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Cameo ring, between Michigan
Theatre and Sugar Bowl. Family
keepsake. Finder please phone'
2-6190.
LOST: Green Sheaffer Lifetime pen,
Jan. 14 between Angell Hall and
Forest. Desperately needed. Betty
Naneakow, call 6577.
FOUND: Outside U. Drug. Yellow
leather change purse. Owner call M.
Rich. 2-5268. Identify contents.
LOST: 6" slide rule. Name on back.
Address on leather cover. Call 4295.

LOST:Black
in League
found, call

leather envelope purse
Friday afternoon. If
Jean Dennis, 9823.

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Nine matched Kroydon!
irons. Call 2-4401. Ask for Geo.
Koskinas.
OKLAHOMA NATIVE PECANS*:Rich,
full flavored nuts, 5 pounds $2.98,
post paid. Send mail order to Law-
tonka Pecan Co., P.O. Box 959, Law-
ton, Okla.
WANTED
WANTED: Architectural student
draftsman for partime work. Tele-
phone before 8:15 a.m., 3936.
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY, HOUSE: Prefer-
ably small house near campus for
occupancy Sept. 1st. Write price, lo-
cation, don't call: WWC, 1313 Ford
Bldg., Detroit 26.
SERVICING and REPAIRING
HAVE YOUR typewriters, adding ma-
chines, calculators repaired. Work
guaranteed. Office Equipment Ser-
vice, 1111 S. 4th Avenue. Phone
2-1213.

h-

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

U-

i

...

SUNDAY, JAN. 20, 1946

11:00-News

1:40-Leo Erdody

8:00-News 11:05-Unitarian church 2:00-News
8:05-Organ Music 2:05-Symphonic Selections
8:15-Jack Connor Trio 12:00-News 3:00-News
8:30--Freddie- Martin 12:05-Do You Remember 3:05-California Harmonies
9:00-Thomas Peluso 12:15--Carol Gilbert 3:30 U of M Women's Glee
9:30-Ave Maria Hour 12:30-Concert Hall of the Club
10:00--News Air 4:00-Milt Herth
10:15-Michigan Highway 12:45-Bible Hour 4:15-Johnny Herbered and
Department 1:00-News Orchestra
10:30--Henry Busse 1:15-Boy Scouts of 4:30-Boston Blackle
10:45-veteran's Counseling America 5:00-News
Service 1:30-Moments of Devotion 5:15-Carlos Molina

V111
Sweeping '/2 Off Sale

r

Y

NWAINNNNNCMV
1

COATS
Formerly 34.95 to 69.95
Now 1/2 Off
SUITS
Formerly 22.95 to 45.00
Now V2 Off
BLOUSES
Formerly 3.95 to 9.95
Now 1/2 Off

SKIRTS
Formerly 6.95 to 14.95
Now /2 Off
DRESSES
Formerly 5.00 to 49.95
Now 2 Off
SWEATERS
Formerly 5.95 to 10.95
Now 1z Off

SUNDAY DINNER

ITALF GRAPEFRUIT

FRUIT COCKTAIL

tained by writing
Public Relations, Air Forces
Room 3-330
Pentagon Bldg. Washington,

D. C.

Dr. Wessinger
Urges pom ion
Asserting that a majority of
victims of infantile paralysis re-
cover, Dr. John A. Wessinger,
county health officer, issued a plea
that everyone contribute heavily
to the March of Dimes.
"'As a iember of the foundation,
I know their work is successful,"
Dr. Wessinger"said, adding that
"we need p!,enty of money." The
Washtenaw County Polio Founda-
tion, which works as part of the
National Foundation, alone spends
about $1,0 a year, lr. Wessin-
ger diselodi.
All- eesr treatmients are
given everyone stricken with the
disease., Dr. Wessinger said, even
if the patient is unable to pay for
the treatments. That is why the
Foundation needs money, he said.
They also need money for research,
and that money must come out of-

CHICKEN SUPREME SOUP
VARIETY OF CELERY, OLIVES, AND PICKLES
BROILED LAKE HURON TROUT with tartar sauce $1.50
GRILLED TENDERLOIN STEAK
with french fried onions.....................2.25
GRILLED PORTERHOUSE STEAK
with french fried onions ....."............ 2.00
GRILLED SIRLOIN STEAK with french fried onions 1.85
BROILED LAMB CHOPS...................... ...1.50
BAKED VIRGINIA HAM with candied yams........1.50
ROAST YOUNG CHICKEN with sage dressing
and giblet gravy .. ........ ............ 1.50
SOUTHERN FRIED CHICKEN.. .............. 1.50
-ead Lettuce Salad with Thousand Island' Dressing
Fresh Frozen Vegetables: Corn, Green Peas, Lima Beans
French fried potatoes, mashed, candied yams

ROBES
Formerly 8.95 to 55.00
Now Of
Special Beauty Bonus:

ll

$2.00 DuBarry Derma 'Sec Cream

$1.00

$2.50 Kathleen Mary Quinlan Strawberry Mask $1.00
$2.00 Dorothy Gray Blustery Weather Lotion . $1.00

Homemade Apple Pie
Ice Cream

Lemon Meringue Pie
Cake

TO BE SERVED IN THE DINING ROOM
OR TO BE DELIVERED

1
, 3
.

' C HA4f

11

I

/ill

%,-- , " I i -- ?,V V J U i , r I IT."I

1111 \ / A M T H

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