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January 13, 1946 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-01-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13, 1946

.: _ _ __. L ,s_.a

HIGHER STANDAR

D OF LIVING:

As the meeting broke up, President
R. J. Thomas of the UAW-CIO told
reporters the Board would issue no
statement at this time and that any
action on the union's part would be
announced at tomorrow's conference
of General Motors local unions.
Reach Policy
Thomas indicated, however, that
the Executive Board may have ar-
rived at a policy. He said the Board
"will have a recommendation which
it will make to the conference tomor-
row."
General Motors yesterday rejected
the recommendations of the fact-
finders that the corporation pay a
191/2 cents an hour wage increase, or
approximately 17.5 per cent.
Further consideration of the fact-
finding committee recommendation is
scheduled at a Sunday afternoon
meeting of the 200 delegates of GM
locals.
Demonstrations Called
The Executive Board is expected to
formulate recommendations to the
conference of delegates. The dele-
gates are empowered to authorize ac-
ceptance or rejection of any wage in-
crease.
Other developments in the strike
today included a demonstration by
225 war veterans who are members of
the UAW. In uniform and civilian at-
tire they paraded around the giant
General Motors Building. Similar
demonstrations were called for in
other cities.
Led by sound car playing military
airs, the marchers carried American
flags, union banners and placards. In-
cluded in the placard legends were:
"No apple-selling this time," "Unite
for Justice," "Heroes yesterday, un-
wanted today."
Chrysler Workers Return
The GM strike has entered its fifty-
third day with 175,000 GM workers
idle in 92 plants across the country.
The union has demanded a 30 per
cent wage rate increase.
Elsewhere, Chrysler Corp. called
3,000 workers back to work Monday
in its Dodge Truck Plant. The AFL
Teamsters Union today withdrew a
picket line which shut the plant
Tuesday. The company had said the
reason for the picket line was that
"Chrysler Corp. will not demand its
Dodge dealers employ only AFL driv-
ers." Union spokesmen said the dis-
pute was not settled, despite the pick-
ets' withdrawal.
OPA To Assist Veterans
With Housing Problems
DETROIT, Jan. 13 (/P) - The Of-
fice of Price Administration will give
all possible assistance to Detroit home
owners who want to share their homes
with veterans and their families.
This was promised today by W.
C. Haines, Area Rent Rirector.
He labeled as false, reports that
OPA regulations discourage the rent-
ing of rooms or remodeling for apart-
ments.

U. S. Seeks End to Trade Restrictions
By The Associated Press cates, helped American industry. Proposals Recommended
WASHINGTON, Jan. 12-The na- But free-traders come back with Now the United States has recom
tions of the world have adopted a the argument that the less we bought mended, as United Nations agreemen1
jumbe oftrad ruls whch afecta set of trade proposals. If adopted.
most everybody's pocketbook, directly from abroad, the fewer dollars other they would pledge a halt or a reduc
or indirectly. nations had to spend here-for what tion of trade restrictions.
Consider a girl with a yen for the Minnesota cannery worker was The proposals will be combed over
French kid gloves, or a man who making, and for other products, first by a conference of the 15 major
wants an English overcoat. And con- Whether it made for a higher or trading nations, and then by UNC
sider a worker in a Minnesota can- lower standard of living in the long Both conferences are scheduled fol
nery. run was a question politicians de- some time in 1946.
High Tariffs bated. The administration changed The proposals ask that nation,
The United States put up such a from the high tariff policy of the agree to reduce tariffs-although eac]
high tariff wall in the late 20's and Smoot-Hawley days to the freer trade torwoue prit oudo wat
30's that foreign goods became pro- policy of the late President Roosevelt rin would be permittedr t do what
hibitively costly in many cases. So and former Secretary of State Cordell tect home industries, temporarily
the girl who wanted kid gloves bought Hull as exemplified in the reciprocal from sudden floods of low-priced im
fabric ones, the man who sought an trade agreements. Congress has ap- ported goods.
English overcoat took an American proved in voting extensions of the Re- The proposals intend that no na
one. This, say the high-tariff advo- ciprocal Trade Act. .1

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University Ra

idio Programns-

The University of Michigan Broadcasting Service schedules
the following programs for the week of Jan. 14 to Jan. 20.
MONDAY:
Station WKAR
2:30 p.m. U of M STUDENTS QUIZZ THEIR PROFESSORS
OF EDUCATION4
"The Education Values of Recreation"
Dr. LeRoy Weir, Associate Supervisor in Physical Ed-
ucation and Tennis Coach.
2:45 p.m. COMMUNITY IN ACTION
"Working in Adult Education with Youth Centers and
Community Councils"
Miss Cynthia Jones, Field Assistant interviewed by Mrs.
Matilda Rubin.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. CAMPUS NEWS
Prepared by Cleland Wyle of the University News Serv-
ice and presented by:
Shirley Pope from Dearborn, Michigan;
Arthur Shef and Keith McKenney from Burlington, Vt.
TUESDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
Student-written, student-enacted radio dramas. Directed
by Prof. David Owen.
WEDNESDAY:
Station WKAR
2:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC
"Epochs in Music" Music in England in the XVII Cen-,
tury; an all HENRY PURCELL program on the occasion
of the 250th anniversary of Purcell's death. Overture:
"The Rival Sisters"; Sonata for two Violins and Piano;
Pavanne for Strings; "Trumpet Voluntary" for Organ,
Trumpets, Trombones and Drums. The complete pro-
gram is under the direction of Prof. Hanns Pick.
2:30 p.m. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
"The Veteran and Provision for G.I. Education"
Clark Tibbets. Director of Veterans Service.
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIES
"Rheumatic Fever"
Dr. Paul Noth
THURSDAY:
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. THE UNIVERSITY CARILLON
Played by Mr. Sidney Giles
Station WJR
11:15 p.m. THE MEDICAL SERIES
"What About Your Blood Pressure?"
Dr. Richard Lyons, Associate Professor of Internal
Medicine.
FRIDAY:
Station WKAR'
2:30 p.m. THE ORIGINAL DRAMA
Student-written, student-enacted radio drama. Directed
Prof. David Owen.
2:45 p.m. WORKER'S EDUCATION SERIES
"Labor Goes to School"
Station WPAG
3:15 p.m. DOROTHY ORNEST, Soprano.

CLASSIFIED ADVE"TISING

tion ri te new tar ills. Tis could be
extremely important to the U.S.,
since businessmen in such nations as
India and Australia, where the war
has resulted in the establishment of
new factories, are reported to be
thinking of new tariffs, new protec-
tive walls against manufactured goods
from the U. S. and other industrial
countries.
Preference Scaled Down
The British Empire has a system
called "Empire Preferences" which
blocks goods from non-empire na-
tions. Lower duties are charged on
goods imported from empire coun-
tries.
New Disorders
Erupt in Haiti
Trouble Is Caused by
Celebrating Crowds
PORT AU PRINCE, Haiti, Jan. 121
-(P)-Fresh disorders erupted today
throughout troubled Haiti after aj
night of unrestrained celebration of
the overthrow of the iron regime of
President Elie Lescot and the seizure
of control by a three-man military
junta.
From 15 to 20 persons were reported
to have been killed and some 100
wounded in yesterday's coup d'etat. As
night fell jubilant crowds in this
French-speaking Caribbean capital
plunged into wild and weird demon-
strations which lasted into daylight.
They danced to voodoo chants and
shouted the national anthem.
Crowds were said to have put the
torch to the residence of the former
Minister of Information and Police,
Gontran Rouzier.
Lescot's hilltop mansion was empty.
It was believed the president and his
family either were aboard a ship
which slipped quietly into port last
night, or else had been hurried away
by army men to a hideout where Les-
cot would await trial and probable
exile.
The leftist Front Democratique
Unitie, the first political party to ap-
pear on the scene here in years, still
withheld its support from the Junta,
but reports from the rest of this tiny.
mountainous republic indicated a
large popular majority favored the
chance.

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
FOR SALE
ATTENTION Prospective Naval Of-
ficers! Officer's whites, working
uniforms. Waist size 32. 335 E.
Huron, Apt. 4.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Heavy brown leather wallet;
initials P.G.B. Important papers.
Contained no money. Call 2-4561,
Rm. 331.
cost more at Liverpool than wheat
and lumber from Canada.
This protection covered most prod-
ucts made in the Empire which were
in competition with similar products
made elsewhere. It cost us many sales
-but then we had cut British sales
here with our tariff wall.
Under the proposals this "Empire
Preference" system would be scaled
down as the U. S. reduced tariffs. The
same would apply to other prefer-
nces, such as our preference treat-
ment of Philippine sugar and coco-
nut oil, and the French preferences
for products from her colonies.
Poor Driviiiyg Cosis
Motorists Licenses
DETROIT, Jan. 12 (P) - State po-
lic3 reported to the Traffic Safety
Association of Detroit today that
bad driving records cost an all-time
high of more than 12,000 Michigan
motorists their driver's licenses dur-
ing 1945. The figure was abount 2,000
more than the number of licenses
suspended or revoked during 1944.

LOST .at League: Tan wallet
identification, money order.
badly. Would like returned.
ward. Mail to 542 Mosher.

LOST: Delta Gasnmma sorority pin
between Hill St. and Alumni Memo-
rial Hall. Sentimental value. Call
Dotty Wantz, 2-2543.
LOST: Monday between Slaterls and
Barbour Gym, black change purse
containing $19.00 and change.
Money desperately needed. Call
9228. Reward
LOST: Topaz Parker "51" gold-top
pen. Reward. Call Shirley Zack.
9517.
LOST: On Washtenaw Ave., large
sterling pin with many colored
stones. Jabot attached. Great sent-
imental value. Reward. Call 2-4246.
HELP WANTED
WANTED: Part time fountain help.
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Co. 324
South State.
WANTED
"EXPERIENCED, skilled counsellors
wanted, private boys' camp, nor-
thern Michigan, June 23 to Aug. 24.
Write full qualifications, c/o Daily."
WANTED: Men why eat out? Board
by the month and save money. Ex-
cellent food, reasonable rates. Con-
tact house manager 700 S. State.
Tel. 23297.
HEAD COOK wanted private boys'
camp northern Michigan June 23-
Aug. 25. Can bring own pastry cook.
Good salary for competent person.
Write full qualification, c/o Daily.
WANTED to Swap ticket from Ann
Arbor to New York City, for New
York to Ann Arbor. Please call
Rita Jaffe, 4121 - 2147
WANTED: Four Heifetz tickets, two
pair together, if possible. Call 6893.
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY 1946 'Ensian.
Please contact Marie Orr, 9390.

with
Need
Re-

311CIlIGAN

ONE NIGHT ONLY
Mon. Eve, Jan. 21 at 8:30

HOWARD LINDSAY and RLJSSEL CROUSE
(Authors of'LIFE WITH FATHER)
THE HLAPIOJSu NEW YORK
G d LONDON COMEDY 14IT!
DleBy JOHN PATRICK
' t'Y E, YJwih N D L L

Box Office Open
Daily at 10 A.M.

Orchestra $3.00 - $2.40
Balcony $1.20 - $1.80

W.

1:40-Jerry Spears
1:45-Capt. Roland Mc-
Laughlin
2:00-News
2:05-Sunday Symphony
3:00-News
3:05-Bob Crosby
3:30-Wake Up America
4:00-News
4:05iJohnny Harbred
4:30-Boston Blackie
5:00-News
5:15-Carlos Molina

Playing
through
Wednesday

1>
_~-, -..t f
,-~
THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
f..presents .
PLAY PRODUCTION in conjunction with the
SCHOOL OF MUSIC and the UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA
THE BRILLIANT NEW AMERICAN OPERA
"TH E r OmL D A
AND THE T EF"
ALSO-THE GARDEN SCENE
FROM GOUNOD'S "FAUST"
THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
By GIAN-CARLO MENOTTI

I

CONTINUOUS DAILY N
FROM 1 P.M.
STARTS TODAY!
...AND A LOADED GUN,*.
I HAD NO RIGHT PLAYING AROUND
WITH EITHER"
\ F :/

r

SELL"

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..' V ! 1 !A - r

1 AI I/"I.I

1 __ I I F YOU WANT TO LAUGH 1

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