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January 11, 1946 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1946-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHICAN nAIY

1.l S'1 A. .Yl. lL

UP IN THE CLOUDS:
Supersonic Wind Tunnel
Simulates Flight Conditions

. By DORIS WEST
"Tests on tiny models of airplane
components in the proposed Univer-
sity of Michigan supersonic wind tun-
nel will simulate conditions in flight
up to speeds of around 3,000 miles
per hour," Prof. Arnold M. Kuethe
of the Department of Aeronautical
Engineering said yesterday.
"Research in this high range of
mach numbers (the ratio of
flight speed to the speed of sound)
is applicable to projectiles and to
pilotless aircraft," Prof. Kuthe
said. "For ordinary aircraft the
upper limit of speed has not yet
been defined, so any work at these
high mach numbers will provide
data for the design. of airplanes
which will push further and fur-
ther into the high speed region,"
he pointed out.
"The testing section of the tunnel
we plan to build at the airfield the
University is negotiating to obtain
will be around ten inches square,"
Prof.bKuethesaid. Because of the
tremendous power needed to conduct
tests at such high speeds, the size of
the testing section in supersonic wind
tunnels is small compared to the test-
Kim melTold
Roberts Group
Of Fleet Danger
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Jan. 10-Congres-
sional investigators learned today
that Admiral Husband E. Kimmel
told the Roberts Commission four
years ago the Washington adminis-
tration insisted on keeping the fleet
in Pearl Harbor and he had the
choice of agreeing or quitting as its
commander.
The Admiral's testimony at pre-
vious secret inquiries, furnished to
members of the Senate-House com-
mittee today, disclosed that on Dec.
27, 1941, in Honolulu, Kimmel told
the group headed by Owen J. Roberts,
then associate justice of the Supreme
Court:
"I knew that the Navy department
and the administration in Washing-
ton insisted on keeping the fleet out
here. I knew of the vulnerability of
the fleet here. I thought it was ap-
preciated in the Navy department as
well as by me, but it was one of the
things I felt was beyond my power
to change.
"I had the choice of saying I would
not stay and to get another comman-
der-in-chief, or to remain. Natur-
ally, I wish I had taken the other
course at the present time, but I did
not."

ing section of an ordinary wind tun-
nel. The tank of the proposed wind
tunnel may be 15 feet in diameter
and 70 feet long, Prof. Kuethe esti-
mated. For economic reasons, it will
be of the intermittent type.
"In the investigation of high
speed aircraft, we do not deal di-
rectly with the speed, but with the
ratio of the speed to the speed of
sound," Prof. Kuethe said. "In a
supersonic wind tunnel we want to
be able to vary mach numbers
from one to four. Since the speed
of sound under ordinary atmos-
pheric conditions isnabout T75
miles per hour, tests at a mach
number of four would simulate
flight conditions at four multi-
plied by 750, or 3,000 miles per
hour.
The proposed wind tunnel will
combine the advantages of two differ-
ent types of supersonic wind tunnels.
The model to be tested is mounted in
the tube, which is so designed that
air rushes through it into the tank
at the required speed. To accomplish
this, a large tank is evacuated and
then connected to the atmosphere
through a tube. Air comes in when
the valve in the pipe is opened. This
method provides a constant air flow
which will last from 20 seconds to a
minute. The tank can be re-evacu-
ated after each experiment, and is
then ready for another test.
The tank will be strong enough
so that, instead of evacuating it,
the air could be compressed and
released through a nozzle. As each
arrangement has its particular ad-
vantages for specific tests, it is pro-
posed to make the new apparatus
flexible enough to permit both
types of operation.
Another type of supersonic wind
tunnel is built like an ordinary wind
tunnel. A compressor is placed in a
doughnut-shaped tube to provide a
continuous circulation of air. Differ-
ent speeds may be obtained by cor-
rectly designing the different sections
of the tube. As it takes a great deal
of power to run, this is an expensive
type df wind tunnel.
Lt. Comdr. Baier '
Returns to Campus
Lt.-Comdr. Louis A. Baier, chair-
man of the Department of Naval
Architecture and Marine Engineer-
ing, returned yesterday from an an-
nual meeting of the Great Lakes Li-
censed Officers at Cleveland.
Comdr. Baier delivered an address
on "Economy in Ship Propulsion" be-
fore nearly 900 members. Also at-
tending from the University was
Commodore Ellis Reed-Hill, U. S.
Coast Guard.

St. Nick Arrested
On Christmas Eve
By The Associated Press
GRAND RAPIDS, Jan. 10 - A I
police court jury Thursday found
Santa Claus guilty of disorderly
conduct on Christmas Eve.
Officers testified that Victor
Chicky, 42 years old, was arrested
in St. Nick garb while raising a
disturbance in a jewelry store.
They said he complained about
a glass coffee maker he had bought
there, and when police were called,
he tore off his Santa Claus whis-
kers and challenged them to a
battle.
Chicky told the court he had
been playing Santa Claus earlier
in the evening and Judge Edward
G. Burleson let him go to await
a later sentence.
Five Charged
For Consirin
In McKay Trial
By The Associated Press
LANSING, Jan. 10-Five persons
charged with conspiring to "unlaw-
fully prejudice" prospective jurors
for the trial of Frank D. McKay of
Grand Rapids today were ordered by
Circuit Judge Louis E. Coash to
show cause Jan. 19 why they should
not be held in contempt of court.
Judge Coash issued the order on
the petition of Victor C. Anderson,
Ingham County prosecutor, just four
days before the liquor graft con-
spiracy trial of the former Republi-
can National Committeeman and
four co-defendants was scheduled to
start in Ingham County Circuit Court.
Anderson also charged the alleged
conspiracy was an attempt to "dis-
credit" special prosecutor Kim Sig-
ler and "prejudice the case of the
prosecution" in the trial.
Hoover Strike
News Expected
Important statements on the two-
month old Hoover Ball and Bearing
Co. strike can be expected Saturday,
according to a UAW-CIO Local 38
official contacted last night.
Discussions of strike settlement
have reached the wage scale stage.
Union and company representatives
will meet again Saturday, after which
the important announcement is ex-
pected.
Taylor To Speak
At SRA Luncheon
The Student Religious Association
will hold their regular weekly Satur-
day Luncheon at noon tomorrow in
Lane Hall.
Following the luncheon, Robert
Taylor will review Arthur Koestler's
latest book "The Yogi and the Com-
missar," "Arrival and Departure"
and "Darkness at Noon" are his two
well known novels.

PRAYERS IN KOREA - Pfc. Romeo Francassa, 18, of Detroit, with
the Seventh Infantry in Korea, kneels, in prayer at the Seoul Cathedral
beside a venerable Korean, in first celebration of the Martyrs there
in 36 years.
s tii-A swer Box1

MICHICAN

CLUBS:

T. Hawley Tapping To Make
Tour of U' Alumni Groups
A meeting of the Board of Gover- sity of Michigan Club of Philadel-
nors of the University of Michigan phia. Tapping will then go to Lan-
Club of New York City will be the caster, Pa., Jan. 23, where he will
first stop made by T. Hawley Tapping attend the organizational meeting of
in a tour that he will make of the a club for University members living
clubs throughout the East. in that locale.
Meeting in N. J. First Banquet
This first meeting will be held Jan. The first banquet held by the
15 'at the home of the president of the Michigan group of Baltimore, Md.,
group, J. H. Schmidt, '16E, in Short for ten years will be attended by Tap-
Hills, N. J. ping Jan. 25. This meeting is being
On Jan. 22 Tapping will show mov- held for the purpose of reviving the
ies of the University and give a short activities of that organization.
talk before members of the Univer- The last meeting Tapping will at-
tend in his tour will be held by the
University of Michigan Club of
, , * Washington, D. C. Jan. 29.
To See Congresmen
(Continued from Page 1) While in - Washington Tapping
- plans to visit Congressmen who have
approached relative to the dissatis- graduated from the University and
faction of the waiters before the do additional work on Latin Ame-
strike, and that it came as a total can relations, a National Alumni As-
surprise to him. sociation project.
"ht Paul McMurry who attended the
"The wage issue was not brough University in 1942 and who is now
up at all. The main complaint seemsUnvriyn192adwosnw
to be thatthemnfelhatee a first classman at the U. S. Naval
being discriminated against," Prof. Academy will be Tapping's host in
Grismore maintained, adding that "as nnapolis.
far as I can see, they have not been ~ _~
so treated, unless tgnight's example t'aI E
of serving them roast beef instead ofscc i
steaks can be called discriminatory."~
"I personally believe that is was To BopiC
rather a silly childish stunt to leave
without first consulting someone inOost
charge," he said.
Miss'Bailie explained the steak is-
sue as follows: "The meat situation The third in a series of four broad-
is such that it was impossible to ob- casts answering questions applicable
tain enough steak to serve the en- to returned veterans will take place
tire dining room, including the 45 Wednesday over WPAG.
waiters, but that since there were The broadcast, "The Veteran and
enough steaks to just take care of Provision for GI Education," will be
army and civilian personnel, it seemed conducted by Clark Tibbits, Director
most expedient to adjust the menu in of the Veterans' Service Bureau. Tib-
the way in which it was done. bitts will answer questions asked by
Waiters Get Roast Beef Dan Squier and George E. Mann, Jr.
"So the waiters were provided with The last broadcast, "The Veteran's
roast beef, and the steaks served the Misunderstanding of GI Insurance,"
others. The line had to be drawn which will take place Jan. 23, will be
somewhere and I feel sure that if the under the direction of Ward D. Pet-
Army, for example, had been given erson, an insurance specialist, who
the roast beef, they would not have will answer 'questions submitted by
complained." veterans who are puzzled by service-
The Lawyers Club dining room has men's insurance.
a campus-wide reputation for its fine The first two broadcasts, "The Vet-
food, and there is usually a waiting eran and GI Loans," under Mr. Rob-
list of applicants desiring waiters' ert N. Cross, research associate in the
jobs, she pointed out. Bureau of Business Research, and
The walkout appeared to be with- "How the Veteran Can Procure Sur-
out direction, and whether the wait- plus Property" under Mr. Karl Kar-
ers will or will not return to serve sian, Veterans Counselor, answered
meals today is not definitely known. questions formerly not clear to vet-
No notification of a continued refusal erans.
to serve has been received. Meals will The broadcasts are under the gen-
be served regardless of the waiters' eral supervision of Prof. Charles L.
return. Jamison of the School of Business
Eat First Administration.
The waiters first had their meal
of roast beef and then walked off T l71I
the job. Those few who remained,ixeii
residents of the club who felt it would
be inexpedient for them to join theDi e Drv
walkout, together with the remain- Dimesing mn da
ing dining room personnel and a few
volunteers, staffed the cafeteria line. By The Associated Press
All regular guests were accommo- LANSING, Jan. 10-Governor Kelly
dated. today endorsed the 1946 March of
Remarked a freshman law student, Dimes campaign to be held from Jan.
"It is an unfortunate situation, but I 14 to 31.
feel sure that something can be done In a letter to county directors of
to alleviate the condition." the National Foundation for Infan-

Question: I was twenty-five years
of age when I was inducted into
the Army. For this reason I am
entitled to only twelve months of
education. Does the new G. I.
Bill affect me in any way?
Answer: Yes, the amendments to the
G. I. Bill remove the age qualifica-
tion entirely. You should write to
the Veterans Administration office
at Dearborn, requesting that your
period of education be lengthened
on the basis of the total length of
your military service.
Question: I am enrolled in the
University for refresher courses
which do not carry credit. How
do I claim subsistence in view of
the fact that the Veterans Ad-
ministration determines the a-
mount of subsistence on the basis
of the number of credit hours
elected?
Answer: Whenever a student takes
non-credit courses or when he en-
rolls for what is ordinarily a credit
course but does not expect to re-
ceive credit for it, the Dean of the
unit in which he is enrolled eval-
uates the student's program in
terms of credit hours. This is sat-
isfactory for the Veterans Admini-
stration.
Question: I shall soon have com-
pleted my program at the Uni-
versity and would like to go into
a federal or state Civil Service
job. How can I obtain informa-

tion about job opportunities in
the government?
Answer: The Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Informa-
tion carries complete files on Civil
Service job announcements. You
should apply to that office, which
is located in Room 201 Mason Hall.
Question: I am now in school and
expect to re-enroll for the spring
term. What do I have to do in
order to continue my subsistence,
without interruption?
Answer: There will be a special
course election card for veterans is-
sued to you along with your regis-
tration materials at registration
time. Be sure this card is filled out
and left with the appropriate rep-
resentative of your college or school.
This is all you need to do.
Question: My wife has decided to
look fora job at which she can
work while I am here at the Uni-
versity. Where should she apply?
Answer: Have her go at once to the
University Personnel Office, 209
University Hall.
Question: What is the function
of the new Ann Arbor Contact
Office of the U. S. Veterans Ad-
ministration?
Answer: This office is set up by
the Veterans Administration to pro-
vide information about rights and
benefits and to assist veterans in
initiating claims for any or all types
of benefits. The office is located at
103 East Washington Street and is
in charge of Mr. John H. Nuttall.
The phone number is 3503.

FALL TERM
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
February 16 to February 22, 1946
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF FORESTRY AND CONSERVATION
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
NOTE: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time of
exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses
having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first quiz
period. Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted
below the regular schedule. To avoid misunderstandings and errors,
each student should receive notification from his instructor of the
time and place of his examination. Instructors in the College of Liter-
ature, Science, and the Arts, are not permitted to change the time of
examination without the approval of the Examination Committee.

h

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

Monday at 8
1, 9
"p " 10
" } 11
Monday at 1
"2
" " ,

Thu., Feb

.,

Tuesday
Tuesday
"f

1 3
at 8
,, J
"9
" 10
"' 11
at 1
" 2
" 3

.... . .. ......... .... rSat., "
... .. . .Fri., "
....u...................... W es., "
..............Wed., Feb.
........................ ..M on.,
. .......................... T hu., "
........................... Fri. Feb.
........................... W ed.,
....................... . T ues., "
........................... M on., "
...... Sat., Feb.
Thurs.,
........................ ..T ues " 1

21,
16,
22,
19,
20,
18.
21,
22,
20,
19,
18,
16,
21,
19,

10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00

CLASSIFIED A
CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract lates on Request
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Two tickets for remain-
ing Choral Union concerts. Call
Marcus Weston, 9114 between 4 - 6.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Delta Gamma sorority pin
between Hill St. and Alumni Memo-
rial Hall. Sentimental value. Call
Dotty Wantz, 2-2543.
LOST: On Washtenaw Ave., large
sterling pin with many colored
stones. Jabot attached. Great sent-
imental value. Reward. Call 2-4246.
LOST: Topaz Parker "51" gold-top
pen. Reward. Call Shirley Zack.
9517.
LOST: Brown zippered billfold, Tues-
day night. Contains money, im-
portant cards. Contact Sanger
Westphal, 508 Monroe St. Reward.

HELP WANTED
WANTED: Part time fountain help.
Calkins-Fletcher Drug Co. 324
South State.
WANTED
"EXPERIENCED, skilled counsellors
wanted, private boys' camp, nor-
thern Michigan, June 23 to Aug. 24.
Write full qualifications, c/o Daily,"
WANTED: Men why eat out? Board
by the month and save money. Ex-
cellent food, reasonable rates. Con-
tact house manager 700 S. State.
Tel. 23297.
HEAD COOK wanted private boys'
camp northern Michigan June 23-
Aug. 25. Can bring own pastry cook.
Good salary for competent person."
Write full qualification, c/o Daily."
WANTED to Swap ticket from Ann
Arbor to New York City, for New
York to Ann Arbor. Please call
Rita Jaffe, 4121 - 2147
WANTED: Four Heifetz tickets, two
pair together, if possible. Call 6893.
WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY 1946 'Ensian,
Please contact Marie Orr, 9390.

LDVEuTISING
LOST: Monday between Slater's andE
Barbour Gym, black change purse
containing $19.00 and change.
Money desperately needed. Call
9228. Reward

T

8:00
8:10
8:15
8:25
8:30
8:55
9:00
9:30
9:40
9:45
10:00
10:05
10:15
10:30

4 'I

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

I

i

News
Music
Meet the Band
Women Today
Sleepyhead Serenade
News
Music Box
Popular Music
News
Moments of Melodies
News
Music for Remem-
brance
Midmorning Dance
Time
Broadway Melodies

FRI., JAN. 11, 1946

10:40
10:45
11:00
11:05
11:15
11:30
11:55
12:00
12:15
12:20
12:30
12 :45
1:00
1:05
1:10
1:15
1:30

Community Calendar
waltz Time
News r
Al & Lee Reiser
Lean Back and Listen
Farm & Home Hour
College & Martial Airs
News
Jesse Crawford
Today's Band
Along the Sports
Sidelines
Man on the Street
News
Salon Music
Organ Music (Pop.)
South American Way
Woody Herman

HELD
OVER!

ICHIGAN

Playing
through
Saturday!

1:45
2:00
2:05
2:15
3:00
3:05
3:15
3:30
3:40
3:45
4:00,
4:15
4:30
4:45
5:00
5:05
5:15

Dinah Shore
News
Hal Saunders
Melody on Parade
News
Arthur Chapman
University of Mich.
Latin-American Music
It Actually Happened
Little Show
News
Dance Music
Spotlight on the
Stars
Quiz
News
Music
Mystery Melodies

!^' J

SPECIAL PERIODS
College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Political Science 1, 2, 51, 52

.............Sat., Feb.

Chemistry 55 ..........................
Speech 31, 32 ........................
French 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 61, 62, 91, 92, 153..
English 1, 2 ...........................
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54 ................
Botany 1 ..............................
Zoology 1 ...........................:.

Mon.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Tues.*
Tues.,
Wed.,
Wed.,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.

16,
18,
18,
18,
19,
19,
20,
20,
21,
22,
22,

8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00

Sociology 51, 54*........... ...........Thu.,
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32 ....................... Fri.,
German 1, 2, 31, 32 .................... Fri.,

*If3D a , 1, 0

Ginger R OG ER S-Lana TU RN ER
t' s Walter PIDG EON -Van JO HN SON

School of Business Administration
Courses not covered by this schedule as well as any necessary
changes will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

III

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