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December 14, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THI' MT'HY .A N DIA TT

FRIDAY. DECEMBER 14. 1945

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House Splits on Federal Role
In UnemploymentProblem

3. Those opposing both versions.
Some of these are against any such
legislation. Others expressed featr
that any measure approved by the
House would be rewritten later by
Senate-House conferees to meet ad-
ministration desires.
Even some legislators who are fre-
quent administration backers split
over the legislation.
Truman Wants Legislation
Mr. Truman has asked repeatedly
and has criticized the expenditures
group for delay in handling the meas-
ure. The Senate passed a modified
version early in October .
Speaking for the committee, chair-
man Manasco (D-Ala) asserted the
pending measure "is a sensible,
workable bill to try and keep up high
levels of employment without bank-
rupting our government." He added
that "we can't guarantee jobs for all
as the original bill did."
Several Republican leaders spoke
out against either type of bill at this
time, saying that administration
forces would control the writing of
an eventual compromise.
Fisher Back from
Washington Meeting
Dr. Charles A. Fisher, director of
the University Extension Service, will
return today fromWashington, D. C.,
where he attended a meeting of the
executive committee of the National
University Extension Association.
Dr. Fisher is the immediate past
president of this association.

36 Germans
To Be Hanged
For Atrocities
Prison Sentence Is
Given Four Others
By The Associated Press,
DACHAU, Germany, Dec. 13-
Death by hanging was decreed today
for 36 men of the notorious Dachau
concentration camp staff, including
Commandant Martin Weiss and Dr.
Karl Schilling, for atrocities against
inmates during their horror regime.
Of the four defendants, one was
sentenced by the U. S. Military Court
to life imprisonment, and three were
sentenced to 10 years each.
The life sentence today was given
to Peter Betz, a guard against whom
there was little evidence of personal
cruelty. Ten-year terms were im-
posed on Hugo Lausterer, who, wit-
nesses testified, was kind to prison-
ers; Albin Gretsch who was drafted
into the SS and against whom no
personal accusations of cruelty were
made; and Johan Schoepp, drafted
from the Romanian Army by the SS.
Three of the 36 were former pris-
oners at Dachau, but had been ac-
cused by witnesses of many brutali-
ties while working for the SS. They
were Christof Knoll, Emil Mahl and
Fritz Becher. Four other camp doc-
tors, sentenced to death along with
Schilling, were accused of wilful
neglect of sanitary conditions, even
in the face of disastrous epidemics.
Although conceding that "many
acts committed at Dachau clearly
had the sanction of the highest Reich
officials, laws and customs," Lenz
dismissed the defendants plea of act-
ing under orders.

HIGHLIGHTS
ON CAMPUS

Education Films . .
Showing educational films at each
meeting will be a major project of
the Undergraduate Education Club,4
it was decided at a meeting yester-
day.
Prof. Raleigh Schorling, of the
School of Education, will instruct
the member:, on using the latest vis-
ual and perceptual teaching aids.
Each meeting of the club is to fea-
ture talks on educational subjects by
different professors.
The next meeting will be held
Jan. 3.
A Christmas party will begin at
8:30 p.m. today in the Baptist
Gi~id House-
Gift exchange, refreshments,
carol singing, and trimming of the
Christmas tree will be the activi-
ties of th, party.
French Club Meeting .

OLSON LECTURE:
Theory of Sim
To All Childre
"The old idea that all children
should be raised alike has given way
to the modern theory that children
are not uniform nor should they all
be treated in the same fashion," Prof.
Willard C. Olson, of the School ofI
Education, declared in a lecture yes-
terday.
During the early 30's the prevail-
ing theory in raising children was
to treat them as junior size adults,
Prof. Olson continued. Never show
them affection. Kiss them, if you
must, on the forehead, and greet
them in the morning with a hand-
shake, was the guiding rule, he
stated.
The child must be conditioned in
a set pattern, according to the psy-
chologists of only a decade ago. Wat-
son, the formost ' advocate of this
school summed up his beliefs by
stating, "Give me the child and I will
make of him what I will," Prof. Olson
said.

ailr Treatment
n Is Rebuffed.
Today child psychologists believe
that the child knows what is best
for himself, Dr. Olson explained.
Experiments conducted at the Eliz-
abeth MCrwick Memorial In-
stitute showed that when children
were allowed to pick out their own
choice of food, they selected a
well-balanced diet. Experiments
have also proven that children
have a better appetite when they
choose their own food than when
they are forced to a specific diet, he
pointed out.
A major fault of our schools, Prof.
Olson said, is that we try to force
the child to conform to a set stand-
ard. We must realize that all chil-
dren are not uniform, he asserted,
and stop trying to repress their nat-
ural tendencies.
The child will show the teacher
when he is ready to progress to
more advanced work, Prof. Olson
claimed.

FRANTISCK SOPKO -- 15 year
old Czechoslovakian boy who ar-
rived in Norfolk, Va. as a stowaway
aboard a Liberty ship has been
ordered excluded from the United
States by immigration officials1
Backus Will

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A special Christmas meeting of Le
) lISCUSS Cercle Francais will be held at 8 p.m.
. 1 . Monday in the Assembly Room of the
ehabilitation Rackham Building.
Featured on the program will be
the reading of a Christmas short
Prof. Ollie L Backus. acting man- story by Alphonse Daudet. Prof.
ger of the Speech Clinic, will dis- Charles Koella of the Romance Lan-
ss the research program in speech guages department will read the
habilitation at the monthly meet- story. Carol singing, dancing, and
g of the Graduate Study Club of refreshments will also highlight the
e Department of Speech at 4:15 program.
m. today in the West Conference
oom of the Rackham Building. IRA Social . .
Following Prof. Backus, Jane Bud-
en, Margie Nicholas, Catharine The Inter.-Racial Association
right and Elizabeth Ann Taylor, will hold a social from 8 p.m. to
aduate students in the speech de- midnight today at the Congrega-
artment, will talk on particular re- tional Church, State and William
arch projects which they are un- Streets. There will be entertain-
,, + v ,,, oap4t.,,- _and reA freschments

i

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

mainig.

merit, YI.iu'slu, allu

HELP WANTED

EXCHANGE

STENOGRAPHER: Argus Incor-
porated, West William and
Fourth Streets.
WANTED: Assistant cook. Experience
not necessary if capable and willing
to learn. Meals furnished, six-day
week, vacation with pay. Apply Miss
Pomlinson, University Health Ser-
vice-24531.
WANTED
YOUNG WOMAN in pre med school
desires room in private home with
small children. Parents interested
write Miss K, 216 South Ingalls,
Apt. 11.
WANTED: Ride to Chicago. Leave
on Dec. 21. Two.women veterans.
''Please call 2-6295.
DESPERATE: Soldier needs ride to
Chicago Saturday, December 22nd,
about 10:30 A.M. Must attend Jap
Language Graduation and get to
own wedding 7 hours later! Will
share expenses. Contact Cpl. Rudd,
8610.
WANTED: A ticket for the Union
formal Saturday night. Call Betty
Koebel 2-2591.
WANTED: Ticket for Union formal
wanted desperately. Please call Pat
Kittler, 3506.
WANTED: Male help. Boy with no
eight or 11 o'clock classes to wash
dishes. Apply any morning. Martha
Cook Building.
FOR SALE
BEAUTY COUNSELOR GIFT PACK-
AGES for mother, dad, sister or
brother. $1.00 and up. Ph. 7447
or call at 923 Forest.
FOR SALE: Linguaphone language
courses (records). German and
Hebrew. Never been used. Contact
PFC Alfred Baum, 214 Hinsdale,
E. Quad. Tel. 9143 at 12 noon or
5:15 p.m.

TO EXCHANGE: :Four round-trip
coach reservations to New York
City for Friday 21 on the "Empire
State." Will exchange for tickets
dated December 22. Call Mrs. Joan
Mankowski 8:00 A.M.-4:30 P.M.
Tel. 4121 Exchange 748.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: 2 wallets Sunday Dec. 9. St.
Mary's chapel. Finder keep money,
return Identification. Doris Heid-
gen, 1520 S. University.
LOST-Pair glasses, shell-rim, brown
leather case. On or near campus.
Reward. Phone 2-3246 daytime.
LOST - Silver Link Bracelet, silver
spoon pin, valuable only to me. Nita
Blumenfeld. 2-5553.
FOUND-Parker Pen at Sheean lec-
ture. Owner may have by identify-
ing and paying for this ad. Beverly
York, Phone 3366.
LOST: Tuesday, Dec. 4 on or near
campus, valuable keys in black
morocco case. Finder please leave
at Daily office. Reward.
WILL FINDER of large black leather
purse containing birth certificate,
pictures and contract please keep
the purse and send the contents to
Miss N. Marie DeAgostino, Flat
Rock, Mich.
REAL ESTATE
WANTED-Pasadena trade. Home at
852 So. Oakland Ave., one mile from
Cal. Tech., one mile from downtown
Pasadena, four blocks from Los An-
geles Speedway, two blocks from
interurban, 50x150 lot, seven rooms
and two baths-to trade for Ann
Arbor home - will exchange floor
plans, etc. Box. No. xxx Michigan
Daily.
PERSONALS
MORTON: Forget Wednesday night.
All is forgiven! Martha.
MISCELLANEOUS
ALTERATIONS: Ladies' garments.
Some work on men's wear. Velvet
collar. 410 Observatory. Ph. 2-2678.

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

FRI., DEC. 14, 1945
8:00--News.
8:10-Music.
8:15-Meet the Band.
8:25-Women Today.
8:30-Sleepyhead Serenade.
9:00-Music Box.
9:30-Popular Music.
9:40-News.
9:45--Moments of Melodies.
10:00-News.
10:05-Music for Remem-
brance.
10:15--What -Do You Know?
10:30-Broadway Melodies.

10:40-Community Calendar.
10:45-Waltz Time.
11:00-News.
11:05-Al & Lee Reiser.
11:15--Lean Back & Listen.
11:30-Farm & Home Hour.
11:55-College and Martial
Airs.
12:00-News.
12:15-Jesse Crawford.
12:20-Today's Band.
12:30-Along the Sports
Sidelines.
12:45-Man On the Street.
1:00-News.
1:05-Salon Music.
1:10-Organ Music (Pop.)

1:15-South American Way.
1:30-Ruth Wolkowsky.
1:45--Dinah Shore.
2:00-News.
2:05-Hal Saunders.
2:15-Melody on Parade.
3:00--News.
3:05-Arthur Chapman.
3:15-University of Mich.
3:30-Flashes from Life.
3:40-It Actually Happened.
3:45-Mystery Melodies.
4:00-News.
4:15-Adventures in Christ-
mas Tree Grove.
4:30-Meet Me at Morays.
4:45-Dixie Quiz.

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Starts
TODAY

ICUIGAN

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3S BUNNY and NEWS _ Sco&
Sing with PAUL TOMPKINS at the Organ

Also! BUC
EXTRA!

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}!
d

Big Moment

"The boss smokes Sir Walter Raleigh."

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