100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 29, 1945 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OCTOBER V9, 1945

THE MICH16AN DAILY

PaulobTesono Open 67th Choral Union S

ason

Heifetz, Uninsky, Tourel
To Be Heard in Series

Local concertgoers are promised
one of the most successful seasons
in Choral Union history when the
first of a long lisp of outstanding per-
formers-Paul Robeson-opens at the
University Music Society's 67th An-
nual series at Hill Auditorium on Sat-
urday, (Nov. 3).
Included on the current series will
be four major orchestras, five recitals
by distinguished singers and instru-
mentalists and a concert by one of
the world's most famous choral groups
-the Don Cossack Chorus.
Paul Robeson
Nov. 3...
One of the most versatile artists in
the American concert scene, Robeson
won Phi Beta Kappa honors in college
and letters in four sports. He was
selected as an All-America end in
football for two years. In addition,
Robeson is an excellent boxer and is
distinguished in the theater.
Born in Princeton, N. J., he took
his arts degree at Rutgers and his

law degree at Columbia. He also
holds an honorary L.H.D. degree
from Hamilton College.
Robeson has appeared in such play
successes as ''Emperor Jones," "'All
God's Chillun," "Black Boy," and
"Othello." His distinguished career
is a credit not only to his race but
to America as a whole.
Cleveland Orchestra-
Nov. 11...
Experienced as a conductor of lead-
ing European orchestras, Leinsdorf
won great distinction in America at
the Metropolitan opera, where he
conducted numerous performances.
His career as orchestra conductor has
been augmented by operatic experi-
ence, which has brought forth sound-
ness of tradition and versatility of
interpretation.
The Cleveland Orchestra, for more
than a quarter of a century, has per-
formed before millions of listeners;
and by reason of its broadcasts and
its lengthening list of phonograph

records, its artistic resources have
been made known far and wide.
This fine body of skilled musi-
cians, most of whom are solo artists
in their own right, provide an ade-
quate medium. for the display of
Leinsdorf's musical genius and
good taste.
He never exaggerates nor distorts.
His intuition is remarkably sensitive,
discerning and just. He is modest,
self-effacing, and will not be spoiled
by praise. He conducts with sincer-
ity, authority, and poise which com-
municates itself to his listeners in
such a manner to bring about the
most desirable and sympathetic co-
operation.
Alexander Uninsky-
Pianist-Nov. 19 .
Uninsky is counted among the
handful of great keyboard artists of
the day. Celebrated in Europe before
the war and more recently through-
out South America, he has won out-
standing acclaim in the United States
and Canada. From New York to Van-
couver, praises rise to proclaim anoth-
er distinguished virtuoso of profound
stature.
One critic wrote: "This Russian
pianist literally dazzled us with his
brilliant technique, amazing coloring
and musical style." . . . Another

stated, "He brings out crashing chords
with a vital energy that goes to the
roots of the music; or he can set
forth lyric passages with the most
beautiful singing tones."
In Salt Lake City, he "electrified"
his audience. In Chicago, his recital
was "significant"; and in Pittsburg
a critic said, "One can go all out in
stating that he is one of the greatest
pianists."
Jennie Tonrel-Contralto-
Nov. 27
One of those great opera stars
who has also mastered the art of
the recitalist. Her concert appear-
ances are unique in that she makes
them distinctly her own. She ex-
cels both in the singing of songs
as well as in the presentation of
arias from the great operas.
Generally her programs include
outstanding examples in both fields:
she was a star at the Paris "Opera
Comique"; then in America she ap-
peared with leading opera companies,
including the Metropolitan where her
performances have brought many an
ovation.
Don Cossack Chorus-
Dec. 3...,

ed on a purely musical basis. They
were prisoners of war in South Rus-
sia at the close of the Revolution.
Because of the lack of band instru-
ments, he gathered about him human
voices, and developed them as in-
strumental substitutes. Later, when
he and his associates found them-
selves in the Balkans without means
of sustenance, they sang in one of
the great cathedrals, and in this way
earned enough to maintain them-
selves. Their brilliant successes at-
tracted much attention. They were
invited to tour middle Europe. Since
they had been expatriated, they could
not return to Russia.
Phenomenal success everywhere
greeted their efforts, and in 1930 they
came to America. as a well-defined
concert-giving group.
The Boston Symphony
Orchestra-Dec. 1 (0
Generally acknowledged to be the
world's most distinguished orche-
stra. Serge Koussevitsky, its con-
ductor, is conceded to be among the
best, if not the best conductor of
our time. No more need be said.
Jascha Heifetz-Vioii st-
,Ja.*1 *. ,I

concerts and four world tours,Jascha t SP
Heifetz will bring his favorite Guar-
nerius and Stradivarius violins to Hill Feb.*
Auditorium Friday, Jan. 18 for a A piano perfectionist, Artu
concert. Schnabel is acclaimed as the greates
Because of his many international living interpreter of Beethoven
tours, critics have proclaimed him one works.
of America's outstanding good will Placing intellectual art above
ambassadors, showy sensationalism, Schnabel has
Heifetz has composeu much of the become an idol to his many pupils
music he plays and a number of and admirers and has exerted a
compositions have been written espe- great influence on present-day con-
cially for him. To stimulate creative certizing.
art, he has frequently commissioned A veteran of 40 years on the concer
distinguished contemporary compos- stage, Schnabel will appear here Wed
ers. nesday, Feb. 13.
Chicago Symphony- Detroit Symphony-
March_1...
Jan. 3I
Conducted by Desire Defauw, the Concluding the Choral Union Ser
ies will be the appearance of the re
ord-faou hicagb Syphonyme markable Detroit Symphony on Mon.
Orchestra will be the third great day, March 11.
symphony to play in the 1945-46 Under the leadership of its con.
Choral Union Series. ductor, Karl Krueger, the Detro:
It is America's third oldest orche- group has jumped to internationa
stra and is scheduled to play in Hill prominence within the short spac
Auditorium Thursday, Jan. 31. of two years.
Before accepting the Chicago post Krueger's career has been wide-
in 1942, Defauw had conducted orche- spread. He has performed in Buda-
stras in Brussels, London and Mon- pest, Vienna and with other Euro-
treal as well as having been guest pean orchestras. He has also beeni
conductor for many famous Euro- conductor of the Seattle Symphony
pean orchestras. and the Kansas City Philharmonic.

I

- - - - - - - I

Conducted by the well-known Serge Fresh from a tour of South Amer-
Jaroff, the Don Cossacks was found- ica in which he played more than 60

I

CHORAL

NIC
HILL AUDI

1

1945 -
PAUL ROBESON .

N COCERTS
TORIU1946
BOSTON SYMPHONY
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor
MONDAY, DECEMBER 10

Bass

w w " " 0 s s

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
Erich Leinsdorf, Conductor
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11

HEIFETZ.

Q i iii W tl " % so

FRIDAY,

JANUARY 18

ALEXANDER UNINSKY

0 . . Pianist

PAUL ROBESON

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 19
JENNIE TOUREL . . . .. . Contralto
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27
DON COSSACK CHORUS
Serge Jaroff, Conductor
MONDAY, DECEMBER 3

CHICAGO SYMPHONY
Desire Defauw, Conductor
THURSDAY, JANUARY 31
ARTUR SCHNABEL . R , Pianist
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13
DETROIT SYMPHONY
Karl Krueger, Conductor
MONDAY, MARCH 11

t
i .

A LIMITED NUMBER OF TICKETS
Are Available as Follows

I

SEASON (10 Concerts) Tax Included . . . $15.60
SINGLE CONCERTS, Tax Included . . . $ 3.00

- $13.20
-$ 2.40

$10.80
- $1.65

- $8.40
- $1.20

ERICH LEINSDORF

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
CHARLES A. SINK, President
BURTON MEMORIAL TOWER

1. .

If

i

'' i

1 11

i ,+;;Kiy

SMMl ,!,

- ~ ~ c. Us1 ,,. a,..-*' -

0ji

I I1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan