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October 29, 1945 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



PAGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1945
0

C py of United
Nations Charter
Presented to ' U'
Michigan's senior senator, Arthur
H. Vandenberg, one of the five U. S.
delegates to the San Francisco Con-
ference last spring, has presented his
signed delegate's copy of the United
Nations Charter to his alma mater--
the University of Michigan.
The 188-page copy of the Charter
carries the proceedings in five lang-
uages - English, Russian, Chinese,
French, and Spanish and reproduc-
tions of the signatures of all the sign-
ers of the document.
Dr. Alexander G. Ruthven, presi-
dent of the University, presented the
set to the William L. Clements Li-
brary of American History.
There it will be on display with
other rare specimens of famous
American treaties, including the
British prime minister's copy of the
preliminary treaty terminating the
American Revolution, the British
Commissioner's copy of the Definitive
Treaty which supplanted the Tempo-
rary Revolutionary War treaty, which
was rejected by Parliament, and one
of the three handwritten copies of
the Treaty of Ghent.
Keirlikowski Appointed
'U' Hospital Director
Dr. Albert C. Kerlikowske has been
appointed by the University Board of
Regents to the post of Director of the
University Hospital.

195 LOCAL CLUBS:
"U. of M.' Alumni Association
Entering Its Second Century

liii liii

One hundred years ago this month,
on August 6, 1845, to be exact, the
first class was graduated from the
University at Ann Arbor and became
the newly organized alumni body of
eleven.
These first graduates took the
name of the Society of the Alumni of
the Department of Literature, Science
and the Arts, and out of this group
developed the Alumni association,
with its roster of 1,750 life members
and its sonso rsof local alumni
clbs Cls.fiesCucl an
class reunions, the Alumni Catalog
Office, the Alumni Advisory Council
and the "Michigan Alumnus."
Dr. Ruthven States Spirit
The present-day spirit of the As-
sociation is expressed in the follow-
ing statement made by President
Ruthven in 1932:
"We believe that the student should
be trained as an alumnus from ma-
triculation. He enrolls in the Uni-
versity for life, and for better or
worse he will always remain an in-
tegral part of the institution."
In contrast, the scope of the early
group was much smaller. The So-
ciety of Alumni aimed to provide an
opportunity for former students to
gather together, and it was not until
1860 that the alumni participated in
University affairs in any capacity
other than- that of critic.
It then stated its purposes as "im-
provement of its members, the per-
petuation of pleasant associations, the

promotion of the interests of the
University and through that of the
interests of higher education in gen-
eral."
Unity Begun in 1871
The movement to unite the alumni
of all departments began in 1871. The
Department of Law alumni num-
bered 1,024 by -this time and there
were 1,200 medical alumni.
The movement culminated in the
last meeting of the Society of Alumni
in 1-897 and the organization of all
department alumni groups into one
united body, headed by a board of
five directors (later increased in num-
ber). Levi L. Barbour, '63 AB. '65 L,
was elected president and Ralph C.
McAllaster was appointed first gen-
eral secretary and editor of the
"Michirgan -Alumnus."
After a few months, James H.
Prenatiss. '96, succeeded McAllaster.
EShiiley W. Smith, '97 AM '96, served
as general secretary from 1901 to
1904.
Wilfred B. Shaw, '04, Director of
Alumni Relations, began his quarter
century as general secretary in 1904
and was succeeded in 1929 by the
present secretary, T. Hawley Tapping.
'16 L.
Moved to Alumni Hall in 1909
Dtnrins Shaw's administration the
Arso iat ion moved fr-om a room in
University Hall to its present location
in Alumni Memorial Hall at its open-
inc in 1909. The number of local
ehnmni groups grew, and now there
ae 195 such l-ubvstUnique am og
"West of Tokyo" Club, whose mnem-
bers are former students now sta-
tioned west of a line drawn straight
south of Tokyo.
Classes upon graduation are now
or'ganized into 275 groups, each of
Ed. as secretary, coordinates their
activitiet. The Emeritus Club, openi
to alumni graduated 50 years or more
ago, has been functioning since 1930.
The "Michigan Alumnus" is the
oldest existing alumn: publication in
the ccurntiy, with the exception of
the 'Yi e Alumni News." Alvi.ck
Pearson established it in 1894
Tapping Edits :Magazine
Thc magazine, edited by Tapping.
a~pcars weekly during the first two
months of the fall term every two
wxeeks during the rest of the schooi
Syear, v nd monthly in thc summer.
A necrclogy file is published in the
S"Alunmus" and its compilation is -ona
of the functions of the Alumni Cata-
Sldg 0ffhce, headed by Mrs. Lunette
had icy. The office possesses files of
c i.proximnately 99,000 folders con-
taining biographical material, reg-
i stration cards, correspondence and
circulars; the former file of all past
a tnd present administrative officers
srnd teaching faculty members of the
University; and complete undergrad-
uate files from the Registrar's Office
since 1937.

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