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November 15, 1945 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-11-15

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1945

I

Independent Unions Ask
Entry to Labor Parley
Schwellenbach Reports Definite Steps
Toward Promotion of Industrial Peace

DANGEROUS COMICS:
Helps Develop
Air Corps Commuications

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 14-A group
of independent unions demanded en-
try today to President Truman's La-
bor-Management Conference which
Secretary of Labor Schwellenbach
said was "naking definite progress"
toward industrial peace.
Messiah Cast
.Features .Four
N.oted Soloists
The annual Christmas presentation
on Handel's "Messiah," featuring
four distinguished soloists, will be
given by the Choral Union at 3 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 16, in Hill Auditoroum.
Rose Dirman, soprano, of New York
City, will make her first Ann Arbor
appearance while the contralto role
will be sung by Kathryn Meisle, for-
Iner member of the Metropolitan
Opera Company. Arthur Kraft, well-
known tenor, will be heard here for
the first time in many years. MarkI
Love, basso of Chicago, will appear
for the first time.
All four singers have won special
distinction in oratorio performances,
especially in Handel's monumental
work.
Under the direction of Prof. Hardin
Van Deursen, conductor of the Uni-
versity Musical Society, the Choral
Union of 300 singers and a special
orchestra will participate. Frieda
Vogan of the School of Music will be
at the organ, and Hugh Norton of
the speech department will be nar-
rator.
Tickets are on sale at Burton Me-
morial Tower, and mail orders will be
filled.

Schwellenbach attended a meeting
of the conference's executive.commit-
tee, and later told reporters that
three or four of the lesser commit-
tees had finished their preliminary
work and at least one would "have
something definite to report" by Fri-
day. Ile did not specify which one.
On the other hand, CIO President
Philip Murray asked whether today's
meeting of the key executive commit-
tee had accomplished anything, re-
plied "No."
Ira Mosher, president of the Na-
tional Association of Manufacturers.
indicated the executive body was not
wholly satisfied with the' parley's
progress in grappling with specific
labor relations problems.
Edward G. Wilms, chairman of the
independent unions of New Jersey,
declared that unless millions of work-
ers in independen t unions are
granted representation on the Na-
tional Labor Relations Board-as
well as a place at the Labor-Manage-
ment Conference-there could not be
"peace with justice on the home-
front."
Walter W. Generazzo of Waltham,
Mass., president of the 8,000 member
American Watch Workers' Union,
urged that unaffilated unions organ-
ize a "third federation of labor, dedi-
cated to union democracy and labor-
management cooperation," in order
to get recognition for independent
unions at future conferences equal
to that of CIO or AFL.
Generazzo attacked the wage poli-
cies of Secretary of Commerce Wal-
lace and said they can only bring
"discord." Wallace has urged gen-
eral wage increases with a minimum
of price increases. Generazzo con-
tended "no national wage policy can
be established that will cover all in-
dustries or all plants."

"Termi
such as
and the
had a
municati
Air Fore
speech di
view yest
Declari
plane to
nor clear
of procec
sary.
Dr. Y,
Univers
i inthe P
SMember
intredu
commuT
ers, he
ant for
ator.
"The t
put into
in this c
tres of
plots h
each oth
convince
for spea
ment wa

NEW BOEING FIGHTER IN FLIGHT-The new Boeing Navy fighter XrB-1 is shown during a test flight
at Seattle, Wash. The rlane's main feature is contra-rotatig ; rropellers v1ith speeds exceeding 450 miles-
per-hour.

Ruthven To Welcome
Grads At Assembly
President Alexander G. Ruthven
will welcome graduate students to
the campus at an assembly and re-
ception at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Assistant Dean Peter Okkelberg
will speak for the Graduate School,
and dancing and refreshments will
be on the program.
The Assembly is sponsored by the
Graduate Student Council. Officers
are William Akers, president; Rosti-
slav A. Galuzevski, vice-president;
Kenneth 0. -Beatty, treasurer; and
Ruth Hartmann, executive secretary.
Victory Bonds-To Have
and To A o.d

Prof. Throop To Lead isc ssion;
AII-A~i ethodistrPlanned

inology used in comic strips
"Smilin' Jack" and "Terry
Pirates" and in radio serials
disastrous effect on com-
ons procedure in the Army
es," Dr. Henry Moser of the
epartment said in an inter-
terday.
ing that messages sent from
plane were neither uniform
r. he said f-,at a new system
!dre had been found neces-
oser, who returned to the
ity this fall, spent two years
ihirippines and New Guinea.
ro a roup of x men who
ced a traiing iprogramn in
ications to Air Force fly-
acted as scientific consult-
the chief signal corps oper-
training program, which was
effect in all Army airfields
country as well as the thea-
war, consisted in teaching
ow to talk effectively with
er," Drs Moser explained. "To
the pilots of the necessity
king clearly, recording equip-
.s used, recorders were placed
anes and imitation airplane
as created."
ective contact by single.
is often a matter of life and
Dr. Moser declared. "In
stance a gunner on a B-24
edged in the belly turret of
ne by a mass of machinery
ould not be removed. An
ry landing would have meant
death. Contact was made
he ground just as the plane'
pply was running low. With-
te landing instructions on
remove machinery to release
inner he would have been
pt when the plane is in enema
y, it remains in contact wit
rol tower," Dr. Moser said
lot receives instructions as h
t, he must make position re
he passes over range station
landing, he must receive per
to enter the traffic platform.'

pilots must be instructed in contact-

i

ing the ground and other planes and
bomber crew members must be train-
ed to communicate with cach liowner.
The traning program was organ-
ized at the oice Conmmunicadtions
Lab, Waco, Tex. Appreximately
three thousand men were given in-
struction in the Pacific theatre,
Dr. Moser said. "We conducted
about six two-hour ',classes a day
and worked with fighters, bombers
and carriers."
Dr. John Black, head of the speech
department at Kenyon College and
director of the project, was aided by
speech professors from Northwestern
University, and the Universities of
Minnesota, Texas, Iowa, and Purdue.
They were assisted by a group of
engineers, statisticians and a large
number of enlisted personnel who
were experts in psychology.
Dr. Moser received a commendation
from Gen. Ingals, chief signal corps
officer of the United States Army,
for his work in communications.
Professors . ..
(Continued from Page 1)
toward this stronger world agency.
By expressing a willingness to dis-
close the secrets of the atomic bomb
to an armaments commission prop-
erly censtituted by the UNO, the
U. S. would he putting forward the
strongest possible argument, for
such a commission. If carried out,
this plan would give the UNO such
s grave responsibilities that all na-
tions would participate in it in a.
greatly heightened spirit of coop-
eration. This is the objective above
all for which we must strive.
"It is our sincere hope that you
y share our views on these vital and
i fateful questions. Since it is our be-
L. lief that you do, this letter is intended,
e not to persuade you to their accept-
- ance, but to reinforce your conviction
s of their soundness. We trust that
- you will assert the full force of your
"' leadership in Congress in support of

Talk To Follow Sabbath
Eve Services at HillelI
Prof. Palmer A. Throop, of the his-
tory department, will lead the discus-}
sion, "Maimonides, Guide for the1
Perplexed," following services at 7:451
p.m. tomorrow at the Hillel Founda-
tion.
The Sabbath eve services will be
led by Rabbi Jehudah M. Cohen in
the Hillel chapel. Student cantors
are Gilbert Iser and Benson Jaffee.
Students may enroll in Hebrew
classes at the Foundation from 3:30
to 5:30 p.m. today and tomorrow. The
first meeting's of beginning, interme-
diate and advanced classes will be
held 7:45 p.m. Monday or Wednes-
day.

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

CLASSIFIED ADVEITISING

Wesley Foundation Invites in airpb
noise wa
Faculty, Students to Meal "Effe
The Wesley Foundation of the First death,"
Methodist Church is holding a tradi-ea'th"
tional All-Methodist Breakfast for one ins
tioalAllMehodstBrekfst orwas w
Methodist students and faculty mem- the Pa
bers at 8:30 4. m. Sunday in the ball- that c
room of the Women's League.-ordina
Jeanne Rolfe is chairman of the certain
committee planning the breakfast. with th
The following people direct the sub- fuel sul
committees: Steve Peterson, tickets; out tho
Delia Morgan, hosts and hostesses; how tol
Betty Terry and Hendrie Theunissen, the gu
decorations; and Marjorie Lamb, pub- killed."
licity. "Exce
Tickets are now available from 3 territory
to 8 p. in. in the League lobby or in a contr
the Methodist Church offices. "The pi
Participants in the program will be taxis ou
both faculty and students. After the ports as
breakfast, all will attend church to- and, inI
gether. mission
* I For this
Newman Club To
Start Annual Drive
Campus-wide canvassing for the
annual Newman Club Membership
Drive will begin today under the
leadership of Camelita Fisher, the
new Membership Chairman.
Volunteers will canvass the large
dormitories during the week. Those
who can not be contacted in this way
may enroll and pay dues at the Fri-
day Evening Parties, or after all the
Masses on Sunday in the club rooms.
According to Carmelita Fisher, the
double goal of this drive is to enroll
every Catholic student attending the
University in the Newman Club, and
to stimulate interests in the projects
of the group making every member a
functioning organism in the club.

THURS., NOV. 15, 1945"
7:30-Sleepyhead Serenade.
8:00-News.
8:15-Meet the Band.
8:25-Outdoor Brevities.
8 :30-Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-wake Up and Live.
9:00-Music Box.
9:30-Popular Music.
9:40-News.
9:45-Moments of Melodies.
10:00-News.
10:15--What Do You Know.
10:30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Community Calendar.
10:45-Waltz Time.

11:00-News.
11:05-Carmen Cavaiero.
11:15-Lean Back & Listen.
11:30-Farm & Home Hour.
11:55-Today's Tune.
12:00-News.
12:15-Jesse Crawford.
12:20-Spike Jones.
12:30-Along the Sports
Sidelines.
12:45-Man on the Street.
1:00-News.
1:05-Salon Musi ,
1:10--Organ Music (popu-
lar).
1:15-Ray Bloch Presents.
1:30-Johnny Long.

1:45-Music for Millions.
2:00-News.
2 :05-Bob Halsey.
2:15-Melody on Parade.
3:00-News.
3:05-Fred Feibel.
3:15---University of Michi-
gan.
3:30-Flashes From Life.
3:40-It Actually Happened.
3:45-Mystery Melodies.
4:00-News.
4:15-Dear Santa.
4:30-Meet Me at Morays.
4:15-Dixie Quiz.
5:00-News.
5:05-Music for Listening.

VICTORY BONDS ISSUED HERE!

WANTED
WANTED-Boys to wait on tables in
return for good meals at Sorority
House near Campus. Phone 7100.
TWO SAILORS on 72-hour leave
want tickets for Ohio State game
desperately! Contact Jane Sanger,
5769 between 5:00 and 11:00 p.m.'
WANTED-SEWING, changing zip-
pers, hemming skirts, refitting par-
ty dresses, or what have you. Miss
Livingston, 2nd floor front, 315
South Division, walk up.
WANTED MEN'S CLOTHING-A
better price paid for men's used
clothing. Sam's Store, 122 E.
Washington St.
FOR SALE
BICYCLE - Men's "Hawthorne"
aluminum pre-war tires, good -
headlight $20. Call 2-6119.
FOR SALE-Maroon, velvet evening
wrap. Size 15. Call 2-1339 after
eight p.m.
ROOM AND BOARD
WANT TO GET FAT? Eat at Chi Phi.
Standard rates. See Roger Jacobi,
1530 Washtenaw, 4295.
STUDENTS -Kitchen and waiters'
pinafore. Board job. Hutchings,
1109 E. Huron.
HELP WANTED
FRATERNITY NEEDS 8 MEN to
work in dining room on Saturday
evening from 5:30 to 8:00. Meal
included. Pay by hour. Call 2-1214.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Lady's beige coat with zip-in
lining. Taken from coat rack on
second floor of League, Friday aft-
ernoon. Please contact Betty Pec-
senye, 2-1568.
LOST-Lady's small rose gold Ledy
Elgin watch on N. University or
State Novs 13. Contact 2-4471
Room 1543,
LOST-Women's blue-gray and red
Shaeffer fountain pen on campus.
Call Dolores Rink 2-4471.
YOU WHO "BORROWED" my blue
Elgin bicycle Monday please return
it. I need it more than you do,
honest! Collee Ide, 2-2569.
LOST MONDAY: Silver and blue-
green Parker 51 pen. Initials J.L.B.
Sentimental value. Reward. Call
Janet Baumgartner, 4452.
MISCELLANEOUS
WILCOX'S RIDING STABLES-
Horses for Hire or boarded - Eng-
lish or Western Saddles - Group or
Private Riding Lessions - Hayrides
-a courtesy car - located at Fair-
grounds, Ann Arbor. 26040.
ALL MEN of Pi Kappa Alpha, please
contact Raymond H. Nething, 203
Adams. West Quad.
PERSONALS
DEAR JOES: All is forgiven. How
about coming to see me Friday, the
16th, at the Open House given by
the girls at Cy Adams House.
Hedy,
1,000 Hill
Buy Victory Bonds!

ssystem to work, he explained,1 them."
Ali PLA EIS TO IMENT
FLIGHT INSTRUCTION
RETURNING AIR FORCE PILOTS ... Check out
in one of our light planes and get your civilian
license.
Make our SKY CLUB facilities your home at the
airport.
AERONCA DEALER
Ann Arbor Airport - 4320 South State Road
Ann Arbor Phone 25-8825

Starting Today
From the Secret Files of a Blind Detective: '
~ TEPRO ED MUO"RERaMSTERY"PKU U U
A killer strikes again and again-until
Duncan MacLain, amazing blind sleuth
--and his seeing-eye dog-solves the
murder that baffled 10,000 police!
NEW ADVENTURES
with
t DAK ABULO

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4 j wil- Iil( 10/ If s_
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MICHIGAN

i

H O E ING

Wednesday, Nov. 28th
State Theatre, 9 p.m.
VICTORY BOND
PREMIERE! 2
A Bond Is Your Admission To The Gala
Premiere Of One Of The Best Motion
Pictures Of The Year!
"WEEK-END AT
THE WALDORF"
Ticket given with every Bond
bought at any Ann Arbor Theatre.

MAGAZINE
Special
Student Rate
2.67 for8 months

NOVEMBER
DANCE
BENNY CARTER
NOVEMBER 24, 8:00-12:00
I-M BUILDING
Tickets .. . $2.00

23rd and 24th
VARSITY NIGHT
CAMPUS & PROFESSIONAL ACTS
NOVEMBER 23, 8:15-10:30
HILL AUDITORIUM
Tickets 50c

:. fi

1 IMARS I

it

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