100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 30, 1944 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY MONDAY OC 4

Will

Open

Choral

Union

Program Includes More
Orchestras This Season
Among the attractions listed for the 1944-45 music series are Helenj
Taubel, Fritz Kreisler, Dorothy Maynor, three well known philharmonic
Orchestras and the Budapest String Quartet.
Besides the ten concerts on the Choral Union series, the annual May
Festival with outstanding soloists, the Christmas performance of Han-
del's "Messiah" and chamber music concerts will also be presented, Dr.
Charles A. Sink, president of the University Musical Society has an-
pounced.
Qpening Is NoV. 4
Opening the Choral Union season
N 4 in Hill Auditorium will be
Helen Traubel, soprano and Metro-
politan Opera star.
Others scheduled for the same
month are the Cleveland Orchestra
with deorge Szell as guest conductor:
Nov. 12; Fritz Kreisler, violinist, Nov.
17 and Josef Lhevinne, pianist, Nov.
27.

Hopwoods Offer BEGAN WITH SIX STUDENTS:
Opportunities to University Has Gr
Young Writers Little School on S
$10,000 in Prizes Is From a school which was started Sophoc]
Sept. 8, 1841 with an enrollment of ing to
Awarded Contestants seven students, one main building ment of
now known as Mason Hall and four Even
Rewarding contestants with a total professors' buildings, the University Een
of almost $10,000 a year, the annual of Michigan has, in 103 years, grad- dentswo
Avery Hopwood contests give begin- ually grown into a school with 5,586 logue
ning writers a chance to have their civilians, 1,161 Army, 1,255 Navy and goodn
work evaluated and their names 221 Marine students enrolled and a in all ca
known in the literary field. campus with 85 buildings, 45 being nc
A bequest by Avery Hopwood made principle structures. Once
the awards possible and presents a In 1817 the first University of conise
unique opportunity for writers in the Michigan, the Catholepistemaid, was algebra
fields of drama, fiction, essay and established in Detroit with a presi- aner
poetry. Of especial interest to the dent, vice-president and "didactors," man a-
Class of '48 will be the annual awards or professors. The school was small lum.
given for freshman writers. and existed in the days of pioneers Only O
Major, Minor Awards until 1821. In that year the terri- Maso
The prizes are grouped in major torial legislature established and ity for
and minor awards-only senior and placed the affairs of the school in a there b
graduate students being eligible for board of trustees who managed the there,
the major awards while all under- school until 1837. brary
graduate students are eligible for the No Responsibility Taken geologic
minor awards if they meet the gen- It was discovered then that the collecti
eral conditions for the contestants. board was not taking enough respon-
very Hopwood, '05, became anfsibility in the school, and so, in that Exe
Avery Hopwoodch'05, became a s ateayear,
prominent American dramatist and year when Michigan became a state, There v
bequeathed one-fifth of his estate the Board of Regents of the Univer- of this
to the encouragement of creative sity of Michigan was created by the of.this
. state legislature to make plans for a $7.50 f
writing at the University. His be- permanent school. Profe
quest states that, "It is especially Keen rivalry was to occur as to payed $
desired that the students competing which city the school was to be salary v
for the prizes shall not be confined located in, but Ann Arbor, after fail- allowed
to academic subjects, but shall be ing to become the state capital, was them 1
allowed the widest possible latitude finally chosen when the Ann Arbor Presi
and that the new, the unusual and Land Company donated a 40-acre ven ha
the radical shall be especially en- tract of land. it was
couraged." With an enrollment of six fresh- Univers
Begins Fifteenth Year men and one sophomore the Univer- a grand
The awards have been given on sity's doors opened with a faculty of
this campus for the past 14 years. two men: the Reverend George P.
Nowhere else in the world does a Williams, formerly head of the Pon-
university offer such large prizes to tiac branch when the University had
its students in the field of writing. consisted of many branches through-
Just one year after the Regents out the state, as professor of mathe-
accepted the Hopwood bequest, pub- matics, and the Reverend Joseph
lishers began to be interested in the Whiting, professor of languages. 01
results of the contests and now Entrance Requirements Then [hs
accept prize-winning manuscripts in Entrance requirements in those
constantl creiing mnubris days made it necessary to pass an Fo
contanly crasm .nmbes. examination on geograpehy, arith-
Henry Seibel Canby, Stephen Vin- mtinonsh grama, arith- laratio
cent Benet, Louis Untermeyer, Arch- through simple equations, Virgil, Ci- interes
ibald MacLeish, Dorothy Parker, Sin- cero's select orations, Sallust, Jacob's studen
clair Lewis, Mark Van Dorn and John or' elton's Greek Reader, Stoddard's affairs
Erskine have all been judges during or Fedron's L adrtdardto co
or Andrew's Latin Grammar, ands o o
the past years in which the contests presen
have been held. Betty Smith, author els and
of the recent best-seller, "A TreePl n Se This
Grows in Brooklyn," was a Hopwood Plans.Set for preside
winner. group
The University also maintains the Developm ent it aft
Hopwood Room as a gathering place A "We r
for students interested in writing formal
and a center for the interests arising million people in the metropolitan Big Fc
from the contests. ulcn o ,,, ,, ences .

HELEN TRAUBEL

HILL AUDITORIUM-This imposing structure is the scene of all
major campus meetings, concerts, and lectures.

GLADYS SWARTHOUT

Hill Auditorium
Campus Center
One of the landmarks on the cam=
pus for uncertain freshmen is Hill
Auditorium as the size alone of this
imposing building makes it a fine
place to start from with a campus
map.!
But it does not take many months
for Hill Auditorium to become anj
integral part of every student's col-
lege experience for it is there that
concerts, lectures. student shows and!
gatherings are held. Possessing seat-
ing accommodations for 5.000 people,
Hill Auditorium has offered its stage
to an untold number of celebritiesj
in Choral Union concerts since 1913,
when the building was completed.
Hill Auditorium was made possible
by a $200,000 grant from Regent
Arthur Hill, of Saginaw. who gradu-
ated from the University engineering
college in 1865.
One of the most outstanding fea-
tures of Will Auditorium is the mag-
nificent organ it contains. The organ
was presented in memory of Prof.
Henry S. Fries,
Before the construction of Hill
Auditorium the auditorium in Uni-
versity Hall was used for campus
functions but it was rather inade-
quate when compared with the pres-
ent day elegance and space of Hill
Auditorium.

CHARLES A. SINK
... Musical Society President
The auditorium is commonly re-
ferred to as "Hill" by the campus
and it has a seating capacity of 5,000
persons. It has been the scene of
many notable campus functions, out-
standing among which was the Gold-
en Jubilee May Festival, the appear-
ance of British Ambassador Lord
Halifax, and many other notable
persons.
The acoustics in the main section
have been carefully designed and

represent one of the finest musical
halls in the nation.
Outside of concert and lecture pro-
grams,' Hill is the scene of many
campus jamborees which include the
monthly Victory Variety Shows,
Hours of Fun, and is the scene of
national broadcasts in Ann Arbor.

FRITZ KREISLER

Charlottesville, Va. and spend six
months at the University.
Known as the Horace H. Rackham
Memorial Building, this white lime-
stone structure was constructed at a
cost of more than five million dol-
lars and was given to the University
by the late Horace H. Rackham.
Both its main lecture hall which
seats 1,200 and the smaller amphi-
theatre have been the scenes of many
University meetings and national
conferences and both winter and fall
graduation ceremonies are held here.
The building houses the University
Historical Archives, the Statistical
service, and the Veterans Service
Bureau as well as the Graduate
School offices.

L _ _.ll "y-, .
5Ti.r.....
UTUEAR~TORYMEDICAL RESEARCH
DAVIS AYE. - i ^! -(f T ' t7
1 ,, i yAS.LirTENAT
__ PORTS -a
1FLW AEMi HOOSPITALT
a 'Q1ROU P GENLRAL
[ t'- CATHERINE STREET T
''I I
OUSE, NUPE
zRES OEN(ES
ANN STREET
ATHLETIO- PLANT --7
- SCALCI,.TEEiT SPEEcil PSYCHO- 2 !N0 AN (1Y
TAcA.OZESHL N TTIJ LOICA
NORTH U~INURSES
RESIDENCE AV
L HUROAMNSRET EC? - - STREE Pvt
A E
TREWETJ~ TR
UAUNClTR RE_ L
4 o N UIG N 7 S STNNIS OURT
QUADANGE I N f~~ERC~~ ~r~~I~ V7 K I--------\_

r

,.,

k

House

I

II

II

I

11111

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan