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November 09, 1944 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-09

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WEAT1HER

Cloudy and Occasional
Light Rin

VOL. LV, No. 8 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN THURSDAY, NOV. 9, 1944

PRICE FIVE CENTS

FDR

POLLS

23

ILLIO

I

L

OSLIDE

II

11

* *

Dewey'

r *

* *

Lose

State

*

*

*

*

*

on

50,000

'LOSt'

Votes

! _

Kelly Heads Winning
Michigan GOP Slate
By The Associated Press
DETROIT, NOV. 8-Governor Harry F. Kelly led the entire
Republican state ticket to its third successive clean sweep election victory
in a row in Tuesday's general election, nearly complete unofficial returns
showed today, but Michigan's 19 electoral college votes for president
still hung. in the balance between the Republican and Democratic
columns.
Th e story of the State's Presidential preference lay concealed in
an estimated 50,000 "lost" votes in Wayne county, which will not be
counted until the official canvass starts tomorrow. Wayne election
officials said the mixup resulted from a combination of circumstances
including failure of inexperienced

State Vote
FOR PRESIDENT
3670 precincts of 3,841
Dewey (R).......... . . .1,014,457
Rosevelt (D)..........1,001,911
(QWOR Wayne precincts out of
1386)
GOVERNOR
3621 Precincts of 3841
Kelly (R) ...... . . 1,123,931
Fry (D) ........ . . ..... 906,227
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR
3606 Precincts of 3,841
Brown (R)...........1,070,555
Lee (D) .................881,609
SECRETARY OF STATE
3609 Precincts of 3,841
Dignan (R) ...........1,079,733
Koscinski (D) ... .........874,027
ATTORNEY GENERAL
3597 Precincts
Dethmers (R) ..........1,037,855
Doyle (D).... .........903,058
AUDITOR-GENERAL
3591 Precincts'
Morrison (R) ..........1,025,829
Adams (D) ... ..... ...892,926
STATE TREASURER
3 599 Precincts.
Brake (R) ............ 1,090,479
Schwinger (D) . ...........877,396
3025 precincts of 3,841 in the
state on Proposal No. 1 (chang-
ing restriction of furnishing water
by city) give:
Yes...............677,436
No.... ........ .........579,346
3027 precincts on Proposal No. 2
(eligibility of legislators for state
offices) give:
Yes ...... .............531,966
No ....................549,865
3022 precincts on Proposal No. 3
(compensation of members of leg-
islature) give:
Yes ........... .........482,048
No ......................612,236
3014 precincts on Proposal No. 4
(authorizing Wayne county home
rule) give:
Yes ....................505,295
No .... .................641,852
World News
at a Glance
By The Associated Press
SUPREME HEADQUARTERS AL-
LIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE,
Paris, Nov. 9, Thursday-Elements of
U.S. Third Army Infantry lashed out
in a two-pronged attack along the
snake-like Metz-Nancy front yester-
day, capturing 16 towns and advan-
cing up to three miles on a seven-
mile-wide front. .
As that long-stagnant front sprang
to life amid the thunder of heavy
artillery early in the day, American
fighter - bombers systematically
knocked out German command posts
one by one.
The major American effort was
centered midway between the for-
tress of Metz and fallen Nancy,
where the infantry forced multiple
crossings of the shallow, muddy
Seille River and stabbed on more
than two miles at some points.
LONDON, Nov. 8.-The German
High Command declared today that
the London area was under bom-
bardment by the vengeance weapon
v-12, reported to be a long-range
rocket which propelsa ton or more
of explosives over a 50-mile-high
trajectory at 700 miles an hour.
Vicious fighting between American
and Japanese forces on Leyte Island
in the central Philippines raged to-

election boards to consolidate regular
ballots and soldier vote ballots, and
their confusion in handling the di-
vided State and national ticket bal-
lots.
Kelly Polls 1,000,000 Votes
Kelly polled more than 1,000,000
votes and ran up a better than 215,-
000 lead to capture the State. He
carried all but four counties-Delta,
Dickinson, Gogebic and Wayne, a
far stronger showing than that of
Thomas E. Dewey, Michigan's na-
tive-son Republican presidential
nominee.
Behind Kelly, with comfortably
safe margins ranging from more than
120,000 to nearly 200,000, Michigan
elected Auditor General Vernon J.
Brown as Lieutenant Govesrnor; re-
elected Herman H. Dignan as Secre-
tary of State and. D. Hale Brake as
State Treasurer; and elected John R.
Dethmers, Republican state chair-
man, as Attorney General, and John
D. Morrison, Marquette accountant,
as Auditor General.
Bennett Loses
In Congressional contests, every in-
cumbent appeared to have been
elected with the exception of Rep.
John B. Bennett in the 12th district,
who lost to former Rep. Frank E.
Hook in a close contest on the basis
of complete unofficial returns.
Democrats gained an added seat in
the State senate, but Republicans
still will be in control of 24 of the 32
seats. The Democrats also gained
seven state House of Representatives
seats, with a division of 63 Republi-
cans, 33 Democrats and the remain-
ing four seats still in doubt.
FDR Ahead in Wayne
Dewey ran up an outstate lead of
213,000 votes in Michigan, but this
melted rapidly when it collided with
Wayne County's Roosevelt majority.
In 1294 Wayne County precincts
Roosevelt polled 473,534 to 273,687 for
See MICHIGAN, Page 4
Washtenaw' s
Record Vote
Goes to GoP'
As the fate of Michigan's 19 elec-
toral votes hung in the balance, vir-
tually all of Washtenaw County's
record vote have been unofficially
tabulated and this county stayed
in the Republican column in Tues-
day's general election.
Close to 50,000 voters went to the
polls in the County's 41 precincts
and by two to one and three to one
returned to office all GOP incum-
bents except for selecting one Demo-
cratic coronar.
In Washtenaw County, included
in the second congressional district,
incumbent Congressman Earl C.
Michener, of Adrian is far in front
of Redmond Burr (Dem.). With 98
out of 163 precincts reported, the
vote stands 44,548 for Michener,
21,514 for Burr.
And so it reads all the way down-
ever Republican Washtenaw County
-Christman, over Masten for the 1st
District state representative; Warner
over Costello for the second district
representative; Rae over Hendley for
county prosecuting attorney; Osborn
over Norris for county sheriff; Flem-
ing over Muyskens for county treas-
urer; and Ganzhorn (Rep.), .was
10,000 votes ahead of Clark (Dem.)
in the coroner race.

250 Editors
Open Meet
Here Today
'U' Press Club Begins
27th Annual Meeting
"More than 250 editors and writ-
ers, representing publications
throughout Michigan and surround-
ing states, will attend the University
Press Club of Michigan's 27th An-
nual Meeting which begins this
morning," Prof. John L. Brumm, of
the journalism department said yes-
terday.
Sessions of the Club, only organi-
zation of its kind in the country
dealing exclusively with editorial
matter, will continue through Satur-
day morning, Saturday afternoon,
pressmen and their wives will attend
the Michigan-Illinois homecoming
football game.
Meet in Union
"General sessions to be held Thurs-
day and Friday afternoon in the
Michigan Union and the Rackham
-Amphitheatre, are open to the public
and include talks by Dr. Robert M.
Mclver of Columbia University's So-
ciology Department and Harold C.
Shearman, British education leader,"
he said.
The first session to be held today
in Rms. 316-320 of the Union will
deal with science's contribution in
the post-war world. Spealcers in-
clude: Prof. E. F. Barker, Dr. M. H.
Soule, Prof. K. K. Landes, Prof. S. T.
Dana, Prof. H. H. Bartlett, and Col.
H. W. Miller.
Butler Feature Speaker
Highlighting Friday's program will
be E. K. Butler, photo editor of the
Associated Press, recently returned
from Europe, who will address club
members at a dinner at 6 p.m., to-
morrow in the Union.
Additional Friday meetings sched-
uled for the Rackham Amphitheatre,
include talks by Dr. John W. Rigeal,
director of the Bureau of Industrial
Relations, Prof. I. L. Sharfman, head
of the University Economics depart-
ment, and Victor Reuther, assistant
director of the War Policy Division
of the UAW-CIO in Detroit.
In honor of the newsmen and their
wives, Percival Price, University car-
illonneur, will give a concert at 4:45
p.m. tomorrow, while the wives will
be special guests at an International
Center Tea.
Sigrid Schultz,
Noted Author,
Speaks Today
Immediately after Sigrid Schultz's
lecture on "What Kind of Germany
Will Ensure Peace?" at 8 p. m. to-
night in Rackham Auditorium a re-
ception will be held in her honor on
the third floor of Rackham Build-
ing to which all students attending
the talk are cordially invited.
Shelby Dietrich, '45, president of
the Women's Athletic Association,
stated that the Women's War Coun-
cil feels atat this is a unique oppor-
tunity for the women of the Univer-
sity to hear and meet a noted author-
ity on a subject which is of vital in-
terest now and for the future peace.
She pointed out that it is up to the
women to be cognizant of the actual
situation as it exists.
Miss Schultz is a noted foreign
correspondent and because of her

knowledge of the German situa-
tion and the history of the coun-
try she can speak with authority
on her subject. She is a pioneer
in the field of predicting war again
with Germany after peace is de-
clared.
Instead of Allied occupation of
Germany she prefers to seal off the
country by Allied troops and let the
Germans fight it out among them-

VOTING UNITS
STATE UNITS

POPULAR VOTE

Alabama
Arizona
Arkansas
Calif. (x)1
Colo. (x)
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida (x)
Georgia
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Md. (x)
Mass.
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Mo. (x)
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
N.H.
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
N.C.
N.D. (x)
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pa. (x)
R.I. (x)
S.q.
S.D.
Tennessee
Texas
Utah (x)
Vermont
Virginia
Wash. (x)
W.Va.
Wisconsin
Wyoming
TOTALS 1

2,300
438
2,087
14,841
1,663
169
250
1,498
1,735
845
8,748
4,016
2,466
2,750
4,304
1,971
627
1,328
1,852
3,841
3,703
1,693
4,543
1,175
2,026
280
296
3,657
892
9,121
1,922
2,254
9,306
3,672
1,829
8,208
261
1,282
1,949
2,300
254
870
246
1,715
3,163
2,793
3,098
673
130,810

REPRTG. FDR
1,275 131,035
365 57,959
957 82,822
12,206 1,396,057
1,365 171,066
169 434,841
249 66,901
1,308 293,487
1,124 224,807
758 98,690
8;709 2,073,338
3,888 746,519
2,466 496,493
2,403 227,570
3,803 411,795
739 149,909
612 139,666
1,318 295,018
1,795 968,744
3,670 1,001,911
1,792 363,780
918 97,599
4,412 741,608
1,070 108,114
2,000 213,969
231 17,420
296 120,549
3,644 951,575
774 72,198
9,086 3,278,640
1,384 413,141
1,818 88,397
9,216 1,548,650
3,397 370,263
1,398 172,691
8,175 1,796,469
260 158,814
663 65,770
1,514 80,406
2,115 289,692
249 610,302
837 154,398
245 53,916
1,609 233,865
2,082 283,812
2,307 333,755
2,942 617,696
618 48,803
117,519 23,571,294

DEWEY
29,657
39,578
33,562
1,057,477
207,529
391,349
55,416
126,646
44,687
92,389
1,930,038
841,115
547,344
352,444
347,167
35,274
154,410
278,469
898,735
1,014,457
315,824
7,674
701,191
88,087
301,820
15,586
110,592
932,629
63,903
3,026,802
177,624
103,235
1,571,989
295,513
164,337
1,727,319
114 108
3,648
113,003
184,028
139,273
98,970
71,428
140,415
206,174
263,659
637,781
50,793
20,737,044

FDR DEWEY
11 -
4
9
25
8
3 --
8
12
4
28 10
- - -- 13

11
10
8
16
11
9
15
4
3
4
16
4
47
14
10,
6
35
4
8
12
23
4
11
8
8
413

Popular Vote Returns

INDICATED
ELECTORAL VOTE

10
8
5
19
6

4
25.
4
3
12
3
118

Carries 35 States,
413Electoral Vote
Democratic Strength in Congress Is
Boosted, Dewey Blames War for Defeat
By The Associated Press
Momentum of a massive vote boosted Democratic strength in Con.
gress today (Thursday) and gave the White House added power to
combat tricky problems of war and peace.
And, as the popular vote from Tuesday's election rolled toward the
50,000,000 mark, President Roosevelt declared the balloting had shown
the world that "democracy is a living, vital force."
Thomas E. Dewey, obviously relieved that the political scrap was
over for 1944, attributed his defeat entirely to the war. But he had
held the president to the narrowest margin of popular votes since the
Wilson-Hughes race of 1916.
Late last night the 44,308,294 ballots tabulated were divided this way:
Roosevelt, 23,571,294.
Dewey, 20,737,044.
The difference, 2,834,250, compared with 591,385 in the 1916 elec.
tion.
And, if it was any solace to him, Dewey amassed a bigger vote i
the Solid South than did Wendell L. Willkie four years ago. The
southern states went Democratic, of course.
Republican leaders in Louisiana were so set up about the showing
there that they even began discussing the chances of establishing a two.
party political system in the state.
The Republican presidential nominee, heading back to Albany from
New York City, found one thing to be happy about in defeat. He told
a news conference it was the "high confidence the people expres
ed in the state government."
And he was pleased, too, about the manner in which his foreign
policy views had obtained support within his own party.
But the Roosevelt administration saw the Democrats retain their
majority in a Senate which will have to pass on any treaties that emerge
from international efforts to guarantee peace. And the party laid a
really possessive hand on the House for the first time in months.
Furthermore, Democrats racked up a net gain of three goverlod.
ships. They ousted Republicans in Ohio, Massachusetts, Missouri,
Idaho and Washington, but lost to the GOP in Indiana and North
Dakota.
The latest congressional tabulations showed the Democrats had
raised their house total from 214, past the 218 needed for a numerical
majority, on up to 234. They counted up 54 Senate seats-five more
than a majority.
Seven Senate and 36 House races still were in doubt, but trends
pointed to an even firmer Democratic grasp on the national legislature.
For hours, the state and electoral vote scoreboard remained un-
changed last night. It showed Roosevelt ahead in 35 states with 413
votes, Dewey in 13 states with 118 votes. Ohio and Michigan clung to
Dewey but a possibility remained that they would shift to Roosevelt.
Lagging returns served only to make the Roosevelt victory more cer-
tain-a victory which enemy and Allied capitals interpreted as one for
"internationalism." And abroad and at home, there was every expec-
tation of an early meeting between the President, Prime Minister Chur-
chill of Britain and Premier Stalin of Russia.
Democratic inroads into Republican seats in Senate and House
bulwarked the President's position in dealing not only with foreign
affars but also with domestic problems.
While buttressing their working majorities, Democrats bounced out
of both branches some of the men on whom they had hung "isolationist"
labels during the campaign.
Out of the Senate went such Republicans as Gerald P. Nye of
North Dakota and John A. Danaher of Connecticut. The House drop-
ped, among others, New York's Hamilton Fish and Illinois' Stephen A.
Day.
Furthermore, in Missouri, Idaho and Massachusetts, Republican
administrations took a licking and Democrats elected their gubernatorial
candidates. -
It's the Senate whch has to approve treaties-for peace or anything
else-by a two-thirds majority. Republicans never had a chance at
control of the chamber, but figured they might whittle down Demo.
cratic strength.
But late yesterday the Democrats had a net gain of one seat.
In the House, where the Democrats had a shaky margin of control,
they netted 18 seats and breathed more easily.
WartimneElection Shows
.faith in Democracyai

TOTAL POPULAR VOTE, 44,308,294
(x) Denotes states counting service vote

after election day.

SPIRIT FLARES:
2,000 Expected at Pep Rally's
Biggest Homecoming Bonfire
4"

Fire-the biggest bonfire in home-
coming history-will light the faces
of an expected 2,000 students at the
Pep Rally Friday night, setting off
Michigan's first homecoming cele-
bration since 1941.
Crowds will gather in front of the
Union by 7:30 p. m. to form a street-
wide line which will eventually travel
down State St. to South Ferry Field,
where festivities will center.
Band Present
The Michigan All-American Band,
Dewey Shows
INo0Bitterness

Defeated
Points to

Nominee
GOP Unity

directed by Prof. William Revelli,
will lead the line to the field, playing
Michigan's favorite marching songs.
'M' Club men will follow the band,
carrying lighted torches all the way.
With these torches they will light
the bonfire at the field. Already the
pile for the fire has started climbing.
Old lumber, refuse and general in-
flammatory material should make
the mound over 20 feet high.
Head football Coach Fritz Crisler
will :peak words of inspiration to the
assembled gathering about Saturday',
Michigan-Illinois game. Wally Web-
er, chief football scout, who has
scouted Illinois for some 14 years,
may warn the crowd not to underes-
timate Buddy Young and the rest
of the Illini squad.
'Rousing Spirit'
Cheers, yells and songs will sur-
round all activities. There will be
no such thing as classroom order. At
least four cheerleaders wil be on hand
to lead the crowd in yelling. A snake
dance or two will warm the toes as
well as the spirit.
A painted banner screaming Beat
Illinois will lead the throng down
State St. Plans have been made to
burn in effigy one of Illinois' finest
players.
When the rally is over about 9
p. m., an aroused crowd is asked
to lose none of its enthusiasm. The
whole bunch is invited afterwards to
the sweater dance at the Union with
Bill Layton and his orchestra.
Veterans Group
Calls For Donors
Members of the Veteran's Organ-

NEW YORK, NOV. 8-(P)-With-
out a trace of bitterness or disap-
pointment, Gov. Thomas E. Dewey
indicatednhis belief at a news con-
ference tonight that the war was
solely responsible for his failure to
win the presidency. He declined to
be quoted directly.
The defeated GOP nominee, who
returned to Albany after a day in his
hotel suite here, said he planned to
catch up on state business during the
next few days and then take a vaca-
tion with his family.
Completely relaxed and obviously
glad the campaign was over, Dewey
appeared pleased by what he de-
scribed as these achievements:
1. That the campaign had united
the Republican party more closely
than it has been for 16 years.
2. That he had polled what his

HYDE PARK, N. Y., NOV. 8--(P)-
President Roosevelt, re-elected to a
fourth term in the first war-time
presidential election since the Civil
War, said today "we have again
demonstrated to the world' that
democracy is a living, vital force."
Presidential Secretary Stephen
Early distributed this statement
from the President late this after-
noon:
"For the first time in eighty years
we have held a national election in
the midst of war.
"Democracy . . . Living"

the war and to achieve a lasting
peace."
Early said "bundles of telegrams
and messages" arrived at the Presi-
dent's Hyde Park estate today. "Many
of them contained the phrase, isola-
tionism is dead,' " he said.
Early made public this message
received by the President from Sec-
retary of State Cordell Hull, now
undergoing a physical checkup in a
Navy hospital at Washington:
"I extend my warmest felicitations
on your reelection to the Presidency.
Leadership Praised
"Under your wise leadership our
cnmtrv will rededicate i+alf_ +iini4.ai

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