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February 04, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-02-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

v

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 1945

C

Cast Is Announced for
'The Skin of Our Teeth'

Robert Acton and Janine Robin-
son will have major roles as Mr. and
Mrs. Antrobus in "The Skin of Our
Teeth," a comedy which will be of-
fered by Play Production of the De-
partment of Speech in four perform-
ances Wednesday through Saturday.
Others who will have leading roles
in the play are Dorothy Murzek as
Sabina, Nancy Upson as Gladys, By-
ron Mitchell as Henry and Annette
Chaikin as the fortune teller.
Director of the production is Prof.
Valentine Windt, and Herbert Philip-
pi of the speech department is in
charge of scenery.
All Humanity Included
In "The Skin of Our Teeth" Thorn-
ton Wilder has brought all humanity
within the confines of one small east-
ern community and has sent it whirl-
ing through time and space. With
scant heed to dramatic conventions
he follows an Atlantic City beauty
contest by the Ice Age mingles dino-
saurs and midgets with the actors,
allows the principals to go out of
character to make caustic comments
on the show to the audience across
the footlights.
George and Margaret Antrobus
represent the heads of an average
American family who find themselves
"at grips with destiny, sometimes
sweet, sometimes sour." Through a
thousand reincarnations they suffer
the slow progress and glory in the new
triumphs the race has been able to
consummate.
Wilder Gives Opinions
The characters are a little pathetic
in their determination to survive, and
Wilder makes the observations that
live more nobly in time of war and
slip back into lethargy with the com-
i'ng of peace and security. However,
Wilder believes that whatever pro-
gress that is made is passed on after
each catastrophe through books and
the thoughts embodied in them by
poets, philosophers, scientists and
artists.
"ther members of the cast are:
William Cooke, Frances Sacks, Jean-
ne Parsons, Mary Ruth Acton, Lu-.
cille Genuit, Jean Adams, Babette
and Concert...
(Continued from Page 1)
a panel discussion on the problems of
instrumental music in the secondary
school curriculum, and the music
units for college entrance." Mem-
bers of the panel were C. W. Bemer,
superintendent, Muskegon; John
Thors, principal, Pontiac Senior High
School; Mrs. Roswell Burr, member
of Board of Education, Adrian; Rob-
ert Williams, assistant registrar of
the University; and Mac E. Carr,
superintendent of music, River Rouge.
SR ECORDS
$ I

Blum, Jacqueline Shepherd, Phyllis
Heller, Onnolee Anderson, Miriam
McLaughlin, Florence McCracken,
Jeanne Burns, Lois McIntyre, James

l
j
7
t
1
i

Danish Explorer
Will Speak on
His Adventures
Freuchen To Describe
Work of Underground
Capt. Peter Freuchen, polar ex-
plorer, author and member of the
Danish underground, will tell the
"Epic of an Explorer in the War,"
8 p.m. Thursday in a lecture at the
Rackham Lecture Hall.
It will be the third speaking ap-
pearance in Ann Arbor for the six-,
foot, five-inch, red-bearded explorer,
who was invited here by the geogra-
phy department under the sponsor-
ship of the University's Non-Resi-
dent Lecture Fund.
Freuchen, who was governor of4
north Greenland for 16 years, will
tell of his adventures foiling Nazis in
Denmark. Because of Freuchen's
record as a Danish journalist op-
posed to Nazis, he was a marked man
when the German troops invaded
Denmark. Finding it impossible to
disguise his huge frame, ie was twice
imprisoned by the Nazis only to es-
cape both times. Freuchen's second
escape was made cramped in a pack-
ing case labeled machinery and con-
signed to Sweden.
Professor Emeritus William H.
Hobbs, long-time friend of -the ex-
plorer, revealed that in pre-war days
Freuchen had been called to Ger-
many by Paul Joseph Coebbels, Nazi
propaganda minister, after the Dan-
ish writer had demanded royalties

No one on campus remembers the I supposedly designed by one of the
front door ever being used--yet the greatest of all American architects,
Romance Language building has been w. L, B. Je~nney, an outstanding pi-
nery much in evidence at the Univer- oneer in the field of skyscraper de-
sity since 1880. sign. Numerous authoritative works
Constructed at a cost of $41,400, the on architecture maintain that Jenney
four-story 120 by 50 foot building was the first architect to develop the
served as the University Scientific idea of steel frames for the then on-
and Anthropological Museum until heard of skyscrapers.

quate storage facil
tion the fact that
were difficult to sc
lighting.
With these and
in mind, the Uni
the idea of a perm
RL and built the
1929, when the old

T E RI 'W HJITE E LE PIJA N T' A PPLi ED:
I, Euifding Has Attained RipeAge of 65

DR. ALFRED JOSPE, Director of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel FoundationI
at Indiana University, will lecture
on "A Program *For AmericanI
Jews" at 8 p. m. today at the Hillel
Foundation.
for his books sold in Germany. Goeb-
bels threatened to destroy every copy
of the offending book s.j
"Fine," Freuchen said, "and when
they kick Hitler and his gang out,c
the libraries will have to replace
every book."
He was escorted from Germany the
next day by a member of the Ges-
tapo.
Freuchen, who has written "Eski-
mo" and "Arctic Adventure," will be
introduced by Prof. Hobbs. He madce
earlier appearances in Ann Arbor inj
1931 and 1936.

ROBERT ACTON
has major role

Land, Jane Archer, Ruth Novik, Jay
Chosed, Orris Mills, Ruth Kowalsky
and Sylvia Reidman.
The theatre box office will open
for ticket sales at 10 a. m. tomorrow.
French Sup-ply
Program Plans
Are Announced
Officials Concede
Relations Are Bad
WASHINGTON, Feb. 3--(IP)-The
government announced tonight a far
reaching program for French civilian
supplies, but privately officials con-
ceded that Franco-American relations
will get worse before they get better.
The announcement Covered thou-
sands of tons of food stuffs, industrial
materials, and badly needed trans-
portation equipment, including 700
locomotives and 9,000 trucks, author-
ized for French purchase here.
Officials said, however, that the
French people are now going through
one of the worst winters in their hi-
story, suffering intensely from lack
of fuel, clothing and food in many
parts of the country. They said the
failure to get supplies delivered in
time to prevent this suffering inevit-
ably means some loss of good will
between France and the other Allies.
"Somebody has to be a scapegoat,"
one authority summed it up, "and it
looks like we're it-we are the Brit-
ish."
American policy now appears to be
pretty well fixed along those lines.
1. Lend-lease goods to be actually
given to the French will be munitions
which they need for helping defeat
the Germans and later the Japanese.
2. For the time being they may ob-
tain on a temporary lend-lease credit
basis some long-term capital goods
such as dynamos for which the Unit-
ed States cannot at present offer any
other means of financing. But the
French will have to agree to pay even-
tually. This is about the same sort
of-arrangement which has been work-
ed out with Russia.
3. For purchases of goods for im-
mediate civilian consumption, the
French, under the agreement now
contemplated, will have to put "cash
on the barrelhead."

1929 when the new museum on East Jenney lectured at the University ed over to the Rom
University was built. for a year, during which according to partment.
Structure Called Stout the records he was supposed to have Three Department
During that period, regents of the designed the Romance Language The building nom
University often referred to the build- buildinĀ°-, but there is some doubt as ties of the Univers
ing adjacent Alumni Hall, as "a com- to the role he played in the build- and Spanish Depar
mendable structure of notable stout- ing's construction. Informed Univer
ness." Floor Settled seem to know exa
In the President's report of 1894, After the building was completed door (on State Si
Pres, James B. Angell said of the the trouble started. The ground floor used; just how th
building, "It has unhappily been settled, more than slightly. In 1894 figures on the buil
found necessary to put a new roof the original roof was replaced. ing is another mys
on the Museum and repair the walls University Museum officials discov- j not include the
at an expense of $4,750." ered that the building offered inade- which may never1
"That building was so ill-con-
strutted that it hasbeen a constant
a ource of explonse and solicitude to Th ralSu e t evc
us. It is believed, however, that it N - a s
as never before in so good a con-'
doition as it is at present." 27Campus rganizatiQ
Mysterious Element Enters
But here is where the aura of mys- ALLEN RUMSEY HOUSE KAPPA DELTA
tery enveils the entire situation. Philip Elkins Barbara Scoul
, . . .JORDAN HALL
! While the building is described by ALPHA EPSILON PHI Ruth Meengs
Pres. Angell as somewhat of a "white! Elaine Kattlieman MARY MARKL
elephant," Romance Language was BENSON LEAGUE HOUSE Rachael Shiel
Helen Lewis KEUSCH LEAG
BETSY BARBOUR Claire Hudem
R " - a!Tc31.' .Jeppy Mavison, Norma Lyon LUTHERAN ST
r V CONGrEGATION Al Frank G. Razz,
DCIP S GUIl)Susan Tors
jS Walter Scott ^MARTHACODE
AI ate ct Helen Dickinsc
A free clinic has been established A/S Walter Scott MacGREGOR L
at University Hospital for returned Barbara Stouffer Barbara Haas
servicemen residing in Washtenaw Gale Potee MOORE LEAG
County who have difficulty readjust- DAUJM LEAGUE HOUSE Barbara E H
ing to civilian life, it was announced M. O'lanlon OAKwOOD HO
yesterday. CRAOLEA HOUSE Bernice Bretts
Sponsored jointly by the Michigan
- , Jnet Fr-leyROGER W ILLI
Society of Neurologists and Psycholo- CH e FMEy
fists, the Otfice of Veteran~s Affairs., IIOEA TCWL
ansts, the Stfie ositarl ommisn, iMary Payne Mountjoy Jeanne Thorn
and the State Hospital Commission, EANTHROCK LEAGUE
the clinic is furnished with equip EVANSOUSE Shirley pste
m inent by the state office of Veterans Mae June KuJola WESLEY FOUN
Afiairs. The staff is composed of EL:MWOOD HOUSE Roger Wiselog
members of the neuropsychiatric de- Eula H. Brewster Elizabeth Wri
jpartment of University Hospital, Yp- GAMMA DELTA of Lutheran WILSON HOUS
silanti State Hospital and several Student Chapel- Bonnie Rink Vicky Vignero
Ann Arbor doctors, who are giving KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA WOODLAWN
- their time voluntarily.Mary Hlen Havey Doris Ann W
Veterans may obtain this service
by applying to their county council IS YOUR ORGANIZATION AMONG TH
on veterans afairs. Trhe Ann Ar- if not, come to the WSSF office in Lane
bort (hairian of the council is James between 2 and 4 P.M. any day this we
O'Kane, 223 East Ann St.

Lities, not to men-
scientific displays
ee because of poor
other facts clearly
ve'sity abandoned
nanent Museum in
present edifice in
Museum was turn-
ance Language De-
s Housed
w houses the facul-
ity French, Italian,
rtments.
rsity circles do not
etly why the front
t.) has never been
e grotesque animal
ding came into be-
stery. All this does
designing angle,
be explained.
,e Fund
sentiug
er
EY HOUSE
ds
UE HOUSE
an
UDENT ASSN.
zardi
son
EAGUE HOUSE
UE HOUSE
erman
USE
Schneider
AMS GUILD
HALL
le
HOUSE
in
NDATTON
gal
ght
3E
n
DOUSE
eyl
EM?
Hall,
ek.

4

r

CLASSIFIED A DvEiuRTSIN q

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: In State St. Store, white mit-
ten, name inside. Please return to
Ann Davis, 3523 Stockwell.
LOST: Red leather billfold between
Dimattia Beauty Salon, So. Uni-
versity, and Mosher-Jordan. Call
Zola Meek, 2-4561.
LOST-Cocker Spaniel, lost two
weeks ago, vicinity of Hill street.
White feet. Reward. Phone 2-1729.
LOST: Gold watch fob, four inches
long with topaz attached. Lost in
or near Rackham on Washington
up to parking lot. Family heirloom.
Substantial reward.
LOST: Plain gold cross on black rib-
bon-in Union swimming locker
room. Sentimental value. Tele-
phone 2-2914 or 4483 evenings.
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS: Ladies garments,
dresses, suits, and coats. Opposite
Stockwell Hall. Phone 2-2678.
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Housekeeper, family of
three,, laundry out, no children.
Call 2-1592.

HELP WANTED: Drug clerk and
fountain. Excellent hours. I tt
pay. Witham Drug Co. 601.
Forest.
WANTED: Assistant cook, experience
not necessary if capable and will-
ing to learn. Meals furnished- .
day week. Vacation with pay. Ap-
ply Miss Tomlinsoii, University
Health Service. 2-4531.
MISCELLANEOUS
ROOM AND BOARD for men and

-t.

women at inexpensive rate i
ing from $4- to $8 per week,
student co-operaltive ( uses
further information call
Schwartz, 6957.
BOARD AND ROOM at theS
Phi Epsilon House, 733 S.I
Spring term, for studentso

ran g-
"Joan
Sigma
State
oniy

.

___
. _

fraternity men preferrd . Location
near campus. Se1 M 1 2ek at L
or 6 p. m.I
DORMANT PRUNING. Ilouse or-
chards. Limited schedule filing
now. Rapid approved service. P.
0. box 536.
FOR SALE
IMPORTED SHET'LAND sports
jacket. Men's size 40 long. Like
new. Call 2-4727.

E P. ' S ''r c Si:::S< O - . -

,fi

TUESDAY

- 8:30 P.M

AT THE
RADIO & RECORD SHOP
715 N. UNIVERSITY

V U a

,.

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,,
'

44

RUTH DRAPER

\AR , 'N"SZ" - "a "*a I

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