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January 19, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-01-19

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,THE MICRI AN. DAILY

FRIDAY, JAN. 19, 1945

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10_______TARLAC,
STATUTE Ms6ES : LUZON
WHERE YANKS GAIN ON LUZON-American troops on Luzon
Island are reported to be advancing- beyond Caniling and to have
reached Moncada in their thrust toward Manila. On their eastern
flank the Yanks took Binalonan and thrust east of Damortis. Heavy
Japanese resistance was met in the Fozorrubic-Rosario area.
MYSTERY-SLAYING:
Hoo perMurder Clues Begin
To Form Pattern, Police Say
S- - - ---- - - -- --

By he Associated Press
LANSING, Jan. 18-Clues in the
mystery-slaying of Senator Warren
G. Hooper are falling into a pattern,
the police announced tonight, and
order is emerging from the welter of
confusing evidence and testimony.
Hooper, one of the key witnesses'
in the Carr Grand Jury investiga-
tion of governmental graft, was
found dead--three bullets had been
fired into his head and face-one
week ago today in his burning auto-
mobile on a lonely Jackson county,
highway.
Notlue Neglected
Special grand jury prosecutor Kim
. Segler, the chosen spokesman for
law enforcement officers in this
greatest of Michigan man hunts, said
the original theory that Hooper was
murdered to prevent him from be-
with any other community in the
world. We have given and shall con-
tinue to gij7e everything we have. We
ask nothing in return except that!
consideration and respect which is
our due."
5. Goals for freed small nations
-"We have but one principle
about the liberated countries or
the repentant, satellite countries
wich we strive for according to
th best of our ability and re-
sources."
6. Forthcoming "Big Three" con-
ference-"I have great hopes of this
conference, because it comes at a
moment when a good manysmoulds
can be set out to receive a great deal
of nioulten metal, and also at the
moment when direct advance may be
made towards the larger problems
which will confront the victors, above
all advance to that world organiza-
tion upon which, as we all know, the
salvation of our harassed generation
and the immediate future of the
world depends.
Now Showing
PUA4LE AN THRILLS!

coming a star prosecution witness in
trial courts has not been abandoned,
but that clues have been uncovered
( which also seem to support other
theories, and that "no possible clue
or theory is being neglected."
He said investigators do not treat
lightly the report that Hooper's life
was threatened recently by another
man during a Bay City barroom
quarrel, but declined to discuss this
phase of the inquiry in any detail.
A tall man and a short man ac-'
costed Hooper in the doorway of the
Senate chamber just a couple of
hours before he left Lansing on the
fatal ride identified themselves today,
and proved to be just minor state
officials who had stopped the Sen-
ator to wish him well.
Contact Not Thought Important
Not until they learned that Sigler
considered their .silence was "singu-
lar" did they realize that their con-
tact with him was sufficiently im-
portant to be reported, they said.
Both were released and Sigler indi-
cated he had no further interest in
them.
Dozens of witnesses have been in-
terrogated here, in Jackson and at{
other places as the police continued
to seek a maroon colored automobile
reported at the scene of the killing
which Sigler considers either was
used to intercept the senator to
shoot him, or to pick up the actual
slayer.
$25,000 Reward Considered
A bill posting a $25,000 reward for
capture and conviction of the killers
of Senator Hooper advanced in the
House of Representatives today to
position for a final vote Monday
night, as attempts to amend it on
the floor were voted down.

Yanks Capture
Urdanata, Luzon
Highway Hub
Fierce Jap Resistance
Fails To Halt Advance
By CLYDE BARTEL
Associated Press War Editor
American troops using mobile guns
and armor smashed Japanese tanks
and artillery to capture Urdaneta, a
highway hub town on Luzon island's
central plain, Gen. Douglas Mac-
Arthur reported today.
The fight Thursday (Philippine'
Time) was the stiffest action since
the liberation troops came ashore on
Luzon at Lingayen Gulf Jan. 9. En-
emy guns were cleverly concealed in
bamboo thickets but failed to halt
the American advance.
Paniqui, another highway center,
also was captured by the Americans
in their advance southward on the
central Luzon plain. The town is
12 road miles north of Tarlac, pro-
vincial capital on the highway to
Manila, which is 70 more road miles
south.
Rosario Boinlardedj
Seventh fleet ships bombarded
Nipponese positions at Rosario, on
the east flank of the American drive,
helping$ break down stubborn ene-
my resistance to Yank forces which
have reached the outskirts of the
town.
The Americans are moving toward
Agoo northwest of Rosario, appar-
ently to sever another road into the
Benguet Mountains, where the Jap-
anese are reported to be concentrat-
ed.
Yank wyplanes are operating from
Lingayen Airfield, which was cap-
tured a few hours after the Lingay-
en landings.
Attack Luzon Airdromes
Allied aircraft continued to attack
enemy-held airdromes on Luzon and
to sweep the roads and railways
over which the Japanese are attempt-
ing to move supplies and troops.
Planes wrecked three locomotives, 20
freight cars and more than 80 enemy
motor vehicles.
For the second straight day, Am-
erican night reconnaissance planes
from Philippine fields hit Okayam
airdrome on the southwest coast of
Formosa and also bombed the Toko
seaplane base there.
Adni: Chester W. Nimitz reported
Army Liberators with Lightning es-
corts hit Iwo Jima in the Volcano
Islands, 750 miles south of Tokyo,
Monday for the 30th consecutive
daily attack on the enemy airbase.
Other aerial blows were made on
Nipponese positions in the Marianas,
at Babelthuap in the Palaus and
Yap in the western Carolines.
Three Plead Not
Guilty to Murder
Pleading not guilty to the charge
of manslaughter, Boyd and Cynthia
Green and Charles Miracle, accused
of stabbing 34-year-old Eugene Wil-
son to death, after a quarrel in Wil-
low Village Saturday, were placed
on $25,000 bond yesterday by muni-
cipal court judge Jay Paine.
Examination of the case will be
held Jan. 26.
The Greens and Miracle, Bomber
Plant employees, and residents of
Willow Village are said to have ar-
gued with Wilson over a bottle of
wine, before the alleged stabbing
took place.
Wilson, a World War II veteran,
died Tuesday of wounds inflicted
during the disagreement.
Butts Drops Dead in
Greyhound Bus Terminal

Wallace Butts, of Loganport, nd.,
visiting Ann Arbor dropped dead
in the Greyhound Bus terminal yes-
terday local police officers report.
;Butts, whose age was estimated at
65, was on vacation from his Logans-
port position. He was declared dead
of coronary thrombosis when the
city coroner reached him shortly
after 1:30 p. m.
4 MONTH INTENSIVE
Course for
COLLEGE STUDENTS and GRADUATZ
A thorough, intensive coursc=-start-
ingFe bruary, July, October.
Registration now open,
Regular day and evening school
throughout the year. Catalog,
A SCHOOL OFL BUSINESS
PREFERRED BY COLLEGE MENLAND WOMEN
THE GREGG COLLEGE
Kiidenl, John Robert Gregg, S.C.D.
Dept, Nrectu,. Paul M. Pair. M.A.
C p 8 N.1chigan Are Tel STAte 1881 ChIcag 2,L,.

By The Associated Press
LONDON, Jan. 18 - Brig. Gen.
Frederick W. Castle, one of the pio-
neers of the U. S. Eighth Air Force,
was killed in action December 24,
when his Fortress was shot down by
seven Messerschmitts in the Liege-
Belgium area.
Castle, 36 years old and a resi-
dent of Washington, D. C., was known
as a "Flying Colonel" before his
elevation -to the one-star rank last
Nov. 20.
As the commander of a bomber
wing he was leading the Third Air
Division in attack against the Ger-
- -
Veterans
News
Hichibomber ...
Any veteran who was a Michigan
student before entering the service
and any veteran who has completed
two semesters of work at M1ichigan
with an average of at least 2..2 is
eligible to apply for Michibomber
Scholarship, Lazlo Hetenyi head of
Veterans Organization announced
today.
Invites from SRA . .
The Student Religious Association
has extended two invitations to vet-
erans on campus. Coffee hour will be
held from 4 to 6 p.m. today at Lane
Hall, at which Professor and Mrs.
T. M. Newcomb will be guests of
honor.
A noon luncheon is scheduled to be
held in the basement dining room of
Lane Hall, at 12:15 p.m. tomorrow.
Following the luncheon the meeting
will adjourn to the fireplace room
where Rev. Jack R. McMichael will
address the group on "Students and
Social Action." The talk will be fol-
lowed by informal discussion.
Reservations for the noon lun-
cheon should be made by 'phoning
University extension 2148 before 5
p.m. today.
Sorority Party . . .
A party for war veterans will be
given by members of Alpha Gamma
Delta, social sorority, from 7:30 p.m.
to midnight today at their house on
1322 Hill.
A scavenger hunt, followed by dan-
cing, will highlight the evening's en-
tertainment.
Veterans may bring their wives,
and arrangement can be made to
take care of children.
Postal Notes
Will Appear
The Post Office's latest innovation,
new type money orders, issued in the
form of postal notes, will go on sale
at Ann Arbor's Main .Post , Office,
Feb. 1, Oswald J. Koch, postmaster
said yesterday.
Eighteen note denominations will
be issued, ranging from one cent to
$10.

AIR FORCE PIONEER:
Brig.-Gen. Frederick Castle
Killed in Belgian Plane Crash

man breakthrough into Belgium
when a single Nazi plane swooped in
for a head-on attack, pumping can-
non shells through the Plexi-glass
nose of the plane and wounding the
navigator.
Oxygen Tank Ignited
Six more Messerschmitts then
came in for the kill, spraying gun-
fire into the crippled Fortress and
setting two engines ,afire. An oxy-
gen tank in the waist of the plane
was ignited and threatened to ex-
plode the craft's heavy bomb load.
However, Castle refused to order
the bombs jettisoned because the
plane was flying over Allied soldiers.
To cut down air speed, the wheels
of the Fortress were lowered and
the crew ordered to bail out with
the terse inter-com message, "this
is it, boys."
Grew Parachutes
The bomber shuddered and lurch-
ed on its two remaining engines, but
Castle managed to level out long
enough for the crew to parachute.
Castle apparently was determined to
be the last to leave the plane and as
the doomed Fort spun to 1,200 feet,
a wing fuel tank exploded sending
the ship plunging in a final, tight
death spiral.
Officers To Tell Pacific
Experiences at 'U' Club
Col. Robert B. Hall and Com. C.
M. Davis, recently honorably dis-
charged from this service and now
connected with the, geography de-
partment will tell of their experi-
ences in the Pacific at a dinner meet-
ing to be held at 6 p. m. today by
the University Club.
Prof. Phillip Bursley of the French
department will officiate.

Mark Starr To
Discuss Labor
On Wednesday
War Effort, Economy
Will Be Emphasized
"Organized Labor in the United
States" will be discussedij an ad-
dress to be delivered by Mark Starr,
Educational Director of the Inter-
national Ladies' Garment Workers'
Union at 4:15 p.m., Wednesday, in
Rm. 101 Economics Building.
The war effort and host-war econ-
omy will receive special emphasis in
Starr's talk.
Here for Week
Starr is being brought to Michigan
for a week as part of the program
recently set up by the Workers Edu-
cational Service, which is a new fea-
ture of the University's Extension
Service for experimental adult edu-
cation. He will speak under the
sponsorship of the Department of
Economics.
Sci en tedhe service of the
I.L.G.W.U. after he had worked in
the mines of South Wales, where he
played a leading part in organized
labor.
Wrote Three Texts
Author of three textbooks widely
used in Britain, Starr has published,
recently, "Labor in America," a basic
text on American labor history, in
collaboration with Prof. Harold Faul-
kner of Smith College. "A Worker
Looks at History," "Trade Unionism:
Past and Future," "A Worker Looks
at Economics" and "Lies and Hate in
Education" are other books written
by Starr.
Starr taught British Labor History
at Brookwobd Labor College and was
also on the staff of Bryn Mawr Sum-
mer School for two years.
INVEST I N V I CTORY

s

V

BUDAPEST QUARTET

CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

Friday, Jan. 19, 8:30 P.M.
Q UARE IN 1)MAJoR, K. 499
QUARTrET . . . . . . .
QUARTET IN C-SHARP MINOR, OP. 131
Saturday, Jan. 20, 2:30 P.M.
QUARTET IN G MAJOR, OP. 18, No. 2
QUARTET No. 7, OP. 96 . ..
QUARTET IN A MINOR, OP. 51, No. 2
Saturday, Jan. 20, 8:30 P.M.
QUARTET IN G MIuoR, Oz'. 74, No. 3

. Mozart
SawtuwIBarber
Beet hovens
B ~etho ven
Bre~st Krenek.
. . . Brahms
I-.. ayd n
I . Jilldernihi
IBcethowvn

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F,

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I1

CLASSIFIED
. In Ic_-.n

The new postal note is designed as Qu
a safe, convenient and economical Qu
way of sending through the mails
amounts of money not exceeding $12. I Season
"The postal note epitomizes what 1 Single
we are attempting to accomplish in On S
the entire administration of the pos-M
tal service," Postmaster - General M
Frank Walker explained. "We want
the postal service to be characterized
by efficiency and economy."

AR ET IN E-FLAT MAJOR .
AJRFLT IN C MAJOR, Or. 59, No. 3

n Tickets (3 concerts) : $3.00, $2.40 and $1.20
Concerts: $1 .20 and 60 cents.
le at the University Musical Society, Burton
nemorial Tower, and in the Lobby of the
Rackham Building before concerts.

,4

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Cocker spaniel, black and
white male, 9 months. Any infor-
moation regarding dog will be ap-
preciated. Reward. Phone 2-1729.
FOR RENT
GATTRACTIVE APARTMENTS in
Pittsfield Village. Unfurnished
apartment homes now available.
Light airy apartments, each com-i
plete. with electric refrigerator, 4-
burner gas 'range, automatic hot
fwater, etc. All city conveniences at
hand. Rentals from $50 to. $62
monthly. Drive out Washtenaw
Road to Pittsfield Villiage or go by
bus, which stops right at the vil-
lage. 6 minutes from Ann Arbor,
Privately owned and managed,
Available to selected tenants re-
gardless of occupation, Open daily
9 .i, , j. u p. in, Sundays, 3 p. n.
to 7 _1_i.

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