100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 03, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-01-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIChIGA N DAILY

WVEDNESD 9Y, JA 3, 1945

- - - -- 1 I - ., -

r t m

congress

Stu dies

r

Tr.
r.. y l

I

'JR Supports Proposed
-FManpower Draft
Tax Revisions, More WLB Power To
Enforce Orders to Unions Suggested
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Jan. 2-President Roosevelt gave general support
erday to a war legislation program proposed to the 79th Congress,
vening today, by War Mobilizer James F. Byrnes.
The program includes a draft of 4-F's to meet manpower shortages.

f
i
i

,

~koPP1~~9

1
L
C
1
I

klleged Nazis
kwait Tri~al, z
May Appear Before
Military Tribunal
NEW YORK, Jan. 2.-(IP)-Trial
y a military tribunal apparently is
a store for the two alleged German
,gents who were landed on the
vlaine coast by a submarine Nov. 29.
The men, arrested here. by the
NBI, presumably will be tried in the;
ame maanner as the Nazi agents who
ame to the United States by sub-
niarine two years ago, President
Roosevelt said in Washington today.
t'rial Form Undecided'
The President added that he could
iot, say definitely what form the trial
vould take. He is expected to make
he final decision.
Meanwhile the FBI kept the men,
William Curtis Colepaugh, 26, an
American citizen of Niantic, Conn.,
and Erich Gimpel, 35, a German,
under wraps and declined to com-
nent on time and place of arraign-
nent.
Seen by Two Witnesses
The only statement on the case
.ssued today by the FBI was by In-
spector Connelley who said the two
men were seen by a 17-year-old
schoolboy and a woman shortly after
they slipped ashore near Hancock
Point in Frenchman's Bay, Me.
Young Harvard Hodgkins, the FBI
inspector said, spotted the men
walking along a highway near the;
Maine fishing village in a heavy
snowstorm.
Brahms' Music
To Be Featured'
Presenting an all-Brahms program,
four members of the School of Mu-
sic faculty will appear in the first re-
cital of the new year at 8:30 p. m.
Saturday in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
. Profs. Joseph Brinkman and Was-
sily Besekirsky will play the Brahms
"Sonata for Viola and Piano, Op.
120, No. 1" to be followed by Prof.
Arthur Hackett, tenor, who will sing
a group of six German songs, ac-
companied by Prof. Brinkman, Miss
Maud Okkelberg, pianist, will close
the program with Brahms' "Fanta-
sies, Op. 116."

It also includes a grant of power
to the War Labor ,Board to enforce
its own orders against unions, and
tax revision.
The president conferred with
House and Senate leaders yesterday
morning. They emerged with a call
for action on the plan to give physic-a
ally unfit men the choice of limited,
military service or work in a war
plant-a "work or fight" dictum.
Then the executive iold his news
conference that the ideas of "as-
sistant president" Byrnes contained
in a year-end statement were sub-
stantially in agreement with his
own. #
There were some sour notes im-
mediately, however.
The Treasury disclaimed any re-
sponsibility for hope of tax revision
in wartime.I
A number of Senators and mem-
bers of the House immediately be-{
came wary over the 4-F draft idea.
Senator Kilgore (D-W. Va.) and
Rep. Andrews (R,.-N. Y.) pondered
the same question--how much to
pay the drafted 4-F in a war plant,
the $50 a drafted soldier gets or
the $250 to $300 or more than man{
at the next bench gets? Said Kil-
gore:
Rep. Short (R.-Mo.) threw in a
barb that the Administration "stop
all strikes of able bodied men in war
plants as the number one answer to a
greater labor supply."
® t
Eniner To
iscUs Fatige
InMachines

Army Fires 11
Wara ffieials
Federal Grand I ury
Begins hivestigation
By The ssoceiated Press
CHICAGO, Jan. 2-The Army to-
day discharged 11 officials of Mont-}
gomery Ward and Company in seven
cities, a federal grand jury began an
investigation of the dispute which
led to seizure of the mail order firm's
properties, and Ward's chairman,
Sewell L. Avery, held a long confer-
ence with his associates.
The Army's crackdown came dur-
ing a day of renewed activity in the
controversy, with orders and charges
coming thick and fast from Chicago
headquarters of Maj. Gen. Joseph E
W. Byron, military manager who took
over Thursday under presidential
seizure order.
The 11 company officials were dis-
charged because, General Byron said,
they refused to cooperate and accept
Army appointment
THE VAGABOND POET:

ForM er FaIAy
ihstory 0g Wa

Angell rce e ledal
F'or Story of Artihem
Five former members of the U i-
versity faculty now on leye of -
sonce and also former si.ents are
recording the history of World War
TI Ifor the governmrnt.
Lt. Col. Robert Angell, head of the
sociology departrment, is now head
< Fc4 l1istorian for the ir t Al d Anr-
orn e Army in Eu g land .1evet-
-l Yreceived the bronze star fr super-
$icrwork in recording h ! t tie
Arnhem.
Chief of Ithe entire historical sec-
tion in the European theatre of oper-4
ations is Col. William A. Ganoe, for-,
3LS-In one of the first iterior mie commandant of the Army units
be releaFd by e Ar Forces the here from December, 1941 to April,
"r et to i .o t u .,it'tlO £ tak.-off. 1943.
Men are unidentified, Lt. Col. Wilfred J. Smith, a Uni-
versity graduate with a dcltorate in
}l history in 1938. is now writn the
WM listory of the 14th Air Force in
ra a z ; China.
dify 1 CTiie history of the 85th Infantry
ETR'OIT. Jan. 2.--,')--Victor .Division in Italy is being compiled
Reuther, Asistant2 Director of the and written by Dr.John Arthos, on
United Auto Workers, CIO, War Pol- leave from the University English
icy Division, today urged the War department.
Manpower Commission to exclude all Chase S. Osborn, Ill., who attend-
women workers in the Detroit area ed the University from 1936 to 1938,
from WMC rulings governing male I is writing the history of the Fifth
workers. ArmymnItaly

i
I

_
, : ,,t
=
,*
rt., .
' , ° : "
-{ \
r :J,, ti
.,, ;
'"a, ,ff.'s:,-

I

uc ebborieb
r

i

Fc. Your
PloterCalection

0 *

SUPERFORT PILOT AT CONTRO
photos of ~ 1>29 SI ie-Fm' ress to
pilot tright) is seate4 at controls a]
Behind hhn sits the flight engineer.

These re-issues of Victor Al-
bums. The Boccherini Cello
Concerto played by Casals and
the London Symphony, and
Verdi's Requiem. From the
Radio & Record Shop.

Feginaid,,7 King To icpr-
Poetry for ahais oi l
Reginald King, lecturing on the'
subject "Poetry Can Be Appreciat- bration held last week at the Wo-
ed," will address the Bahais of Ann men' Athletic Building.
Arbor at the second in their series The program will be free to the
of winter programs to be held at public
p 0--4., t ay T incTn 1

*

f

3 p.m. today in Lane nall.
'The Vagabond Poet' GENERAL MAC-THE 'OLD CROCK':
Mr. King, known to radio listeners
as the "Vagabond Poet," has been
interpreting inspirational verse to ag
large audience for the past ninej
years. The step from the microphone
to the lecture platform came as a ; BThe Associated Press
result of popular demand. Today he BASTOGNE. Belgium-That's the folded. They w re
is recognized as an outstanding lec- "Old Crock" for you. battalion command
Lurer, and has won widespread criti- ltemreimtohs sent
cal 'acclaim. The London "Daily
Mail" said of him, "Byron and Shel- "Nuts" reply handed the Germans
ley speak again through Mr. King's by Brig.-Cen. Anthony C. McAuliffe
interpretttign.' of the 101st Airborne Division to
Philippie Songs Featured their demand for the surrender of
Also featured on the program will Bastogne before the siege was broken.
be Lillian Keller, soprano, singing To the tough fighting men of the
two Philippne songs. These songs 101st, the general is known as "Old
will be sung in native costume, and Crock" or "General Mac." To fellow
are being repeated by popular do- officers lie is Tony."
mand, having first been heard at the McAuliffe is 46, stands five feet.
recent Philippine Independence cee- fe, is rudd faced with sharp blue
eyes and carries himself like the;

a, _ "T T _
.; A; "
rt. 1} i'
J ' ' . L' a"F .dam, F- " " =iJ
.CF. Q

I
i
i
a
I

led as far
iost and
on back by

as a
their
mes-,

Auliffe was on the out skirts to meet
ith a hearty handshake and a
"Welcome, Stranger," he greeted
Cat. Wil~am A. Dwight, Grand
head of the tank o on.
The tanks themselve's id a spec-
tabular job in the inal olunge
through the Gernan , s withthe
aid of the 80th Infantry Division.
Coing up from the south they
overran the villages of Ciochillnl
and Assenois, barging through th
latter just as American artillery we';
cutting loose with a heavy barrage.
Later 400 of the enemy were cleaned
out of Assenois.

R
l
j
f!
1

Ring in the
New Year...

0

J. O. Almen, Head of the Mech-
anical Division of the General Moto-
ors Research Laboratory will lecture
on "Fatigue in Machine Parts" at
3:45 p. m. tomorrow in Rm. 311,
West Engineering Building.
Almen has done research work in
connection with fatigue stresses and
dynamic stresses of machine parts.
He has presented several papers on
this subject to national engineering
societies.
Dean I. C. Crawford of the Engi-
neering College commented on Al-
men's visit, stating that it is of im-
portance to the campus since " . .. it
illustrates the close connection at the
University of Michigan between aca-
demic instruction on the campus and
the vital technical problems of in-
dustry connected with research work
bearing on the development and im-
provement of war equipment."

l
CI
L
r
I
.
u
i

Bs Stopped
BySnowdrifts
Family Waits Hours.
Below-Zero Weather

in

i
I

i
I

I

ti
p t
Plolz

By The Associated Press
The story of what happened out
on the highways near Bowling Green
came from Ernest Alguire of Adrian,
Mich. With his wife and three chil-
dren, one a 10-month-old daughter,
he was enroute home by bus.
The vehicle struck a drift about
3 p.m. and stopped. Men tried to
open a path. but the snow, whipped
by a high wind, was too much to
overcome. Alguire walked two miles
to a filling station and got milk for
the baby, and then they waited-
hoping, he said, that eventually the
bus could be free. But at 11 p.m.,the
crew gave up and the passengers
walked to the filling station in five-
below temperature.
The station was packed tight with
motorists already seeking shelter,
but they made room for the family
of five. It was about 6 a.m. today
before rescue crews could empty theI
station.

West Pointer he is.
"During business hours he's all
business," said a fellow officer to-
day, "but when the flag is down-
after retreat sounds-he relaxes.
Like the rest of us, he enjoys an
occasional snort."
He parachuted into Normandy on
D-Day and landed by glider in Hol-
land. Here he just jumped out of the
back of a truck.
As deputy commander of the 101st,
McAuliffe took charge of the situa-
tion here.
With Brig.-Gen. Gerald J. Higgins
of Utah, a regular Army man and an
Assistant Division Commander. he
ran the show until Maj.-Gen. Max-I
well D. Taylor, the Division Com-
mander, got back from Washington
when the German encirclement was
being smashed.
All during the eneir(lement, Me-
Auliffe was out i the front line
sizing up the siuation or back at
the command post out-guessing
the Germans.
On one of his frequent visits to a
crowded hospital, a wounded GI
raised up from his litter and said:
"Don't give up on account of us,
General lac." Tbe general as-
sured' h there would be no giving
j upe.

CA11E
..E T M-4

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Coin purse containing $26 in
bills. Please return. Serviceman's
wife, baby. Reward. Phone 3819.
LOST: One silver arm bracelet. In-
scription: Robert Luthy. Finder
please return to Company A, East
Quad.
LOST-Gold watch, round face, be-
tween Angell Hall and Tappan and
Hill. Sentimental value. Reward.
Phone Maxine Spencer, 2-5232.
LOST-One overnight kit in Cam-
pus Cab on December 30. Call Art
Gronik 24401. Reward.

]

,

With a new ring from
Eiber's. For a birthday gift,
choose one of their birthstone
rings . . . and if you still have
some of that Christmas fold-
ing green why not treat your-
self to a new bauble?
eliciou s
Doe resses..
in mint pastels that look good
enough to eat. Swish styles
that will make you the belle of
the ball. Some in winter white,
too. From the Elizabeth Dillon
Shop.
*.
For Your
Purse Wardrobe ...
A new handbag from the
Mademoiselle Shop. Shiny pat-
ents, rich calf, and small taf-
feta-lined envelopes to carry
to classes. A price to fit every
pocketbook.

r
r

r!

,k

4 ,I

. ;

A

v'

I

' :-

SIC; LEADER-Brig.-Gen. A. C.
McAuhfic (above) of Washington,
D.C., ating (ommander of the
trapped 101st Airhorne Division
during the Bastogne siege, is pie-
turcd somewhere in the European
teaFtre o opqrations. Gen. Mc-
AifeUa: ethe "Nuts" reply to a
German demand for surryTend er.

Editor's Note--This column was written
for the Daily by John Johnson, a mem-
ber of the Union executive council.,
Students who were on campus last
w.inter will remember the "Sym-
phony and Swing" concert given at
Hill Auditorium. It presented the
combined attractions of music by
the University Music Department,
conducted by William D. Revelli, and
the best in swing, in the capable
hands of Earl "Father" Hines. How-
ever, this is not the first of these
concerts. Before the war, when the
good popular bands were still intact
and available, a swing concert was
an annual event on the campus.
First Concerts Held at Ferry Field
At first the concerts were held at
Ferry Field or in the Field House,
where the studente could congregate
for a solid afternoon. The music of
such famous bandleaders as Tommy
Dorsey has reverberated through the
rafters of the big building. Later on.
the concerts were moved to Hill Aud-
itorium, and Charlie Barnet- and Jan
Savitt were among those heard.
"Spring Swing" was revived again
t GOOD VISION
induces
GOOD GRADES fl

last spring, this time in the form 0f
a dance given at Waterman Gym-i
nasium, with Sonny Dunham as the
band. However, the swing concerts
seem likely to become a wartime cas-I
ualty, like many other social events
on campus. Many of the good bands
have been broken up, and those that
are still in existence are not doing
much travelling because of trans-
portation difficulties. Still other lea-
ders have reduced the size of their
bands and are going on tour with
USO units or servicemen's shows.
More Post-War Dances Predicted
After the.- war, Ann Arbor will
again become a scheduled stop for
the nation's bands. Perhaps swing
concerts will not be revived, but the
many activities on campus which
are not active now will sponsor dan-
ces which will bring the best in popu-
lar music to the University of
Michigan students.

WANTED TO BUY
WANTED TO BUY trunk,
robe or box type gladsto
also needed. Telephone 57E

wai
ne k
'87.

rd-
bag

*

"i

,enger to McAuliffe while th Ger- - M-L-
mans cooled their heels.
When the tanks of Maj.-Gen. GIRLS INTERESTED in inexpen-
Hugh J. Gaffey's Fourth Armored sive meals twice a day should call
Division made their appearance, Mc- 5974 for details.

I

3UY WAR BO

It was on the same day that a
German Major and Captain, holding
IND S aloft a white sheet, came over to the
American lines with the surrender
#ultimatum.
The Germans were met and blind-

- lall

WA R BONDS ISSUED
Con;inucus from 1 PM

HERE! DAY OR NIGHT
AA A'f8RAt*f rh' r

__

icM gp

ENDING TONIGHT

i

Michigan
WED., JAN. 10 -at 8:30
The Funniest Farce Comedy New
York Ever Sent on Tour .
458 Laughs
IRECT FROM 65 WEEKS IN N.Y.
JOHN GOLDEN presoft
"A''e'

W
1

oleo
4tto a 1,:
fSflm 'C M
out
c $
AND
e>.
Ilk
i r

4

F
., yyg117
bl
a~ I ,.7 r ff! -
r l t s

O
f
Yi

,1
"x
C bY y , "
#, r0
-. F
< .
, ,.
" " ;
v

CL

Chter Notes ..
To brighten your correspon-
dence. If you don't feel witty
you can rely on the quips at
the top of each sheet to liven
your letters. From Wahr's.

-

_.,,'

I

is :: y S ,

I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan