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December 12, 1944 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGA.-N DATLY

Defenders of

Ormoc

Garrison

on Leyte

Work or Fight

WASHINGTON, Dec. 11,- (P)-
Selective Service acted swiftly today
to put into effect the government's
"produce or fight" directive.
It instructed local draft boards
that present occupational deferment
regulations should be applied "in the
light of the immediate urgencies for
men in the armed services and the
civilian war effort."
The instructions followed a call by
War Mobilizer James F. Byrnes for
"increased drafting of older men not
contributing to the war effort."
To Draft Older Men
Meanwhile, draft director Lewis B.
Hershey said, regulations are being
amended to channel to military ser-
vice all registrants under 36 who drift
from essential jobs. These revisions
will be announced by the end of the
week, a spokesman for the agency
said.
Because military requirements have
been met largely'since last May with
men under 26, few older men have
been called even though they may
have turned to peacetime work.

All Available
Nazi Power
Hurled at Reds
Armor, Troops Defend
Budapest from Soviets
By The Associated Press
LONDON, Dec. 11-Moscow an-
nounced tonight that the Red Army'
had captured only two towns imme-
diately northeast of Budapest today,
indicating the Germans were hurl-
ing all their available manpower and
armor into the defense of the flam-
ing Hungarian capital.
The fierceness of the struggle was
reflected in the Soviet communique's
report that 35 enemy tanks were de-
stroyed yesterday, bringing the total
bag since Friday to 144 tanks knock-
ed out and 75 planes destroyed.
The Paris and Algiers radio had
carried reports that Red Army van-
guards had penetrated Budapest, but
the broadcast Soviet communique
listed only the capture of Szada and
Veresegyhaz, both 81/2 miles from the
capital's northeastern suburbs.
On the central Slovak frontier the
Russians extended their front reach-
ing toward Bratislava and Vienna by
capturing Hont, three miles west of
the road and rail junction of Dregel-
ypalank, taken Sunday.
On the south the Russians were
within five miles of the capital.

By KENNETH L. DIXON
(ADVANCE)-IN GERMANY, (de-
layed)-P)-The boys had been
promised turkey, and they got it. But,
being veterans in this man's army,
they weren't taking any chances
about their post-Thanksgiving din-
ner.
Sgt. Rains Robins of Ben Hur, Va.,
the tank commander, first sighted the

BULLETIN

ordinary privilege of dropping cour-
ses without penalty through the
eighth week.
To Members of the Faculty, Staff
and Student Body: Attention is called
to the Lost and Found Department of
the Business Office, Rm. 1, Univer-
sity. Hall. Inquiry concerning lost
article& should be made promptly at
the above mentioned office. Articles
found on the campus and in Univer-
sity buildings should be turned over
immediately. Those articles not call-
ed for within 60 days will be surren-
dered to the finder.
School of Education Students,
Other than Freshmen: Courses drop-
ped' after Wednesday, Dec. 13, will
be recorded with the grade of E ex-
cept under extraordinary circum-
stances. No course is considered offi-
cially dropped unless it has been
reported in the office of the Regis-
trar, Rm. 4, University Hall.
Health Service Clinic Hours: There
is a tendency for students to over-
Orowdi the general clinic during late
afternoon hours. Early hours in the
forenoon are much freer and stu-
dents are advised to use them when
possible to insure prompt and satis-
factory attention.
Warren E. Forsythe, M.D.
Director, Health Service
Physioal Education for Women:
Registration for the second season of
physical education classes will be
held in Barbour Gymnasium on Fri-
day, Dec. 15 from 8:30 to 12:30, 1:30
to 5:30, and Saturday, Dec. 16 from
8:30 to 12:00. All students planning
to take physical education courses
should register at this time.
Persons traveling or proposing toI
travel at University expense should
thoroughly familiarize . themselves
with the regulations applying thereto
as laid down by the Board of Re-
gents, by inquiry of Mr. Stem or Mrs.

Perkins in the Business Office, if
necessary.
One thing is to be noted in partic-
ular, namely: the University as a
state institution is exempt from Fed-
eral taxation on transportation and
in case any person pays such tax the
Business Office is not permitted to
reimburse him therefor. Ticket
agents selling tax exempt tickets will
require of the purchaser a tax ex-
emption certificate. These certifi-
cates may be had at the Business Of-
fice, Room 1, University Hall, from
Dr. F. E. Robbins in the President's
Office when approval of travel requi-
sitions is secured, or at the office of
Deans or Directors of schools and
colleges. The certificate is University
Form No. 5805. (Do not let any
ticket agent who is inexperienced or
not fully informed argue you out of
the right of exemption for employees
of states. If he will take the trouble
to look the matter up in his tariffs,
he will find you are right.)
Be sure to tell the ticket agent that
you require- a tax exempt ticket at
the time you ask for your ticket. Fail-
ure to do this will require the making
out of new tickets and will be un-
economical both in time and in pa-
per. Our over-worked railway em-
ployees should not be put in a posi-
tion where they are required to do
extra work.
S. W. Smith
Approved Organizations: The fol-
lowing organizations have submitted
to the Office of the Dean of Students
a list of their officers for the aca-
demic year 1944-45 and have been
approved for than period. Those
which have not registered with that
office are presumed to be inactive for
the year. Fraternities and sororities
which maintain houses on the cam-
pus, or those which are operating
temporarily without houses, are not
included in this list.
Alpha Chi Sigma, Alpha Kappa
Alpha, Alpha Kappa Delta, Alpha
(Continued on Page 4)

f
c

ZERO CRASHES INTO BOMBER--According to the caption accom-
panying this Army Air Force photo, this picture was made at the,
inoment of impact when a Jap Zero crashed into a Liberator bomber
of the 13th Air Force over the Philippines. The bombers were inter-
cepted en route to a Negros Island airstrip. Both planes were exploded
and fell to the ground. Note wing broken off and tilting upward
revealing U. S. star insignia.
CHRISTMAS ORATORIO:
University Musical Society
To Present 'Messiah Sunday
The University Musical Society will ~~~i~- ~ ~~~e
present the annual Christmas per- versity, will assist; and the Univer
formance of Handel's monumental sity Symphony Orchestra, under the
oratorio, "Messiah," at 3 p. in. Sun- direction of Professor Golbert Ross,
day in Hill Auditorium. will provide the instrumental back-
day inrHillaudiriustground. The University Choral Un-
Its performance includes the unit- ion, made up of singers from the
ed services of soloists Desi Halban' University, Ann Arbor and surround-
soprano. Mary Van Kirk, contralto, ing communities, will be heard. The
Hardesty Johnson, tenor, and Gean entire ensemble will be conducted by
Greenwell, bass. Harden Van Deursen, conductor of
In addition to these soloists from 4the University Musical Society.
New York, Frieda Op't Holt Vo-VI
gan, instructor in organ at the Uni- H Viennese Soprano to Appear
Desi Halban, young Viennese so-
prano, came to the United States in
1942 after a brilliant European. ca-
CLASSIFIED , reer. She is the daughter of Selma
Kurz, chief lyric soprano at the
DIR E CTORY Court Opera at Vienna. She studied
with Felicia Kaszowska, voice teach-
er, lieder singing with Julia Gulp
and dramatic roles with Marie Gu-
LOST AND FOUND theil-Schoder.
Mary Van Kirk, young contralto
LOST-Brown alligator billfold in with the Metropolitan Opera Asso-
November. Finder keep billfold, ciation, made her debut as one of
mail snapshots to Room 333 Good- the Valkyries. Her first professional
ison, Ypsilanti. appearance was in "The Messiah"
--with the Chautaguqua Symphony
LOST-Blue billfold in campus post Orchestra.
office Nov. 28. Valuable papers. Johnson To Be Tenor
Reward. Mrs. Glass, 516 E. Madi- Hardesty Johnson is a native of
son. Boston, and studied both in the Unit-
ed States and Europe. He has sung
LOST: Sapphire ring in League De- for the New.York Oratorio Society,
cember 8. Call Pat Wilson, 4786. Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Na-
Reward. tional Symphony Orchestra, and the
LOST IN NOVEMBER. Would ap- Hollywood Bowl Association.
nrpeiat +0 .p r-m f gr n strinped

By The Associated Press aay aner Thanksgiving, even in
CHUNGKING, Dec. 11-The Chi- Germany.
nese High Command announced to- Strict efficiency department: Capt
night that all Japanese forces had Ed. Fawkes of Columbia, Mo., wanted
been driven out of Kweichow Pro- to ambush two Mark' 5 tanks which
wince, easing China's perilous mili- were reported to be approaching-
tary situation at least temporarily. so he selected the tank commanded
The communique said the rein- by S.-Sgt. Myren J. Hix of Asheville
forced Chinese counteroffensive had N. C., to do the job. The crew in-
forced two Japanese columns which eluded Corp. Tony Bezas of Staten
penetrated deep into Kwichow back Island, N. Y., Egt. Edwin G. Wawer
into Kwangsi province, had recap- of Fairmount, N. D., and Pec. Ralph
tured Liuchai, just over the border, D. Day of Cincinnati, 0.
and had advanced 17 miles beyond.
The twin Japanese drives which At a prearranged signal from
were aimed at Kweiyang, Kweichow Captain Fawkes, Sergeant Hix
capital and strategic Burma Road opened fire, hitting the first enemy
city, had at one time penetrated to a tank which careened Into a wall.
point 70 miles inside the province. A second tank crashed into it;
Capture of Kweiyank would have put Both German crews bailed out and
the Japanese in a position to strike ran for their lives. Score: one
either toward Chungkink, 200 miles shot, two tanks, no errors.
to the northwest, or at Kunming, 300_ -
miles southwest.
The communique gave no details of 'UY VA R BONDS
the final push which ousted the ene-
my from Kweichow.

I

1

precla e reull nU g el s rpe
Shaeffer pen. Gold clip extends
over top end. Please call 6710 or
return to Room 1, University Hall.
LOST: Tan leather purse containing
$24 between Angell and Lane Hall.
Call Frances Gurche. 2-4561. Rm.
498. Reward.
GOLD PEN LOST MONDAY BE-
TWEEN ANGELL HALL AND
STOCKWELL. REWARD ON
RETURN. CALL 5016 STOCK-
WELL.

I

Michigan
Today and Wednesday

SENIORS

I

mt
.- -
\ 4
Long tacelines
ths ristmas
S)It wa k1rush last year,-Itm-y
tic even blgger this Christmas.
Icaplease help eep Long DistanLc
\i hues cleair icr C'sential calls on
December 24, 25 and 26.
~ .War still vvdtihe wir cex

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