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December 10, 1944 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-12-10

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rmu' TW THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNSDAYDEC. 10, A94

EXPANDS TO LEADING POSITION
Engine School Backs War With All Facilities

By MILT FREUDENHEIM
President Teddy Roosevelt was
bringing another eastern war to a
close in 1905 when the University
completed the West Engineering
Building as a home for one of the
nation's leading colleges of engineer-
ing.
Provided for by the Act of the
Legislature which founded the Uni-
versity in 1837, Michigan's College
of Engineering really came into exis-
tence twenty years later when De-
Volson Wood was made Assistant
Professor of Engineering by Presi-
dent Henry P. Tappan in 1857.
From its original position as the
first state-supported college of its
kind In the country, it has expand-
ed until today, Michigan ranks

fourth nationally in the number of expanded gradually until, in 1895,
bachelors' degrees granted annual- the College of Engineering was cre-
ly and second in masters' degrees ated with Prof. Charles E. Greene as
and doctorates given. the first dean. Mortimer E. Cooley
In accord with its flawless record became dean on Dean Greene's death
in the past, the College is now con- in 1903.
tributing more than its full shtre of Dean Cooley retired in 1928, and
personnel, equipment, and time to held the office oof Dean Emeritus
the war effort. Besides receiving a until his death last August. He
citation from the Ordnance Depart- was succeeded by Herbert C. Sadler
ment of the U.S. Army for service in i who was dean until 1937 when he
the field of research (Oct. 7, 1944), in turn was succeeded by Dean
the College has about 1,500 of its H. C. Anderson. Dean Ivan C.
two thousand students in uniform, *Crawford, the present chief took
and has lost large sections of its fac- office in 939.

ulty to both the armed forces and to
essential war industries.
After the appointment of Dr. J. A.
Angell as president of the University
in 1871, the engineering departments

Xtna y,(t u99e4 tkh

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BOOKS

Fiction,

Travel,

Biography,

Classics and Books for Children
LEATHR GOOS

Billfolds,
Add ress

Diaries/

Memo

Books,

Erection of East Engineering Build-
ing in 1923 brought college facilities
to 1,800, but present increasing en-
rollment indicates that there will be
3,500 engineering students on cam-
pus after the war. Present proposals
of the report of the Post-War Public
Works program call for a two and
one half million dollar addition to
the West Engineering building as
well as an additional million dollar
building to house Engineering Re-
search on the present site of East
Hall,
Divided into twelve departments,
the Engineering College covers all
the major sections of its field
Prof. A. M. Kuethe heads the
Aeronautical Engineering Depart-
ment which is typical of the Col-
lege in the preeminency of its work
relating to the war. Since Pearl
Harbor, the Department has com-
plcted 15 war research projects for
individuals and government agen-
cies dealing with aero-dynamics,
structural research, and design.
Since its organization in 1890, the
Chemical ° and Metallurgical Engi-
neering Department now under Prof.
G. G. Brown, has worked on "process
engineering" research, studying the
design, construction, and operation
of plants which change the chemical
of physical properties of a material.
In 1921, Dean Cooley created the
Department of Metal Processing with
Prof. O. W. Boston as chairman.
Unique as a college department,
Metal Processing deals with coordi-
nation of design and metallurgy in
production.
One of the two principal marine
laboratories in the nation, the Naval
Tank in the Department of Marine
Engineering under Lt.-Comm. L. A.
Blair, USNR, is being used at full
capacity.
The 340-foot tank is the
Eonly one equipped with a shifting
bottom to simulate river shoal con-
Starting
TODAY!

Books

STA TION ERY
MICHIGAN SONG BOOKS
GLOBES arid ATLASES
THE MICHIGA N CALENDAR

ditions. It is now being used for
teaching purposes in the depart-
ment as well as for research by
students and faculty for outside
plants, designers, shipyards, the
Navy Department, the Army
Transportation Corps, the Coast
Guard, and the Maritime Commis-
sion. Studies range from aircraft
rescue boats all the way to river
barges.
A forecast of the type of research
which will be increasingly frequent
as peace approaches was provided by
a recently-concluded project in Prof.
R. S. Hawley's Department of Me-
chanical Engineering. One of the
seven largest manufacturers of a
household electrical appliance spon-
sored a cest of its product in com-
parison with those of its competitors.
Results showed the sponsor's product
inferior, and the University has been
provided with funds to develop a
better one for post-war production.
Use of photography in surveying
from the air, and tests of light
structure steel in the wind tunnel
are two recent projects of the
Department of Civil Engineering,
under Prof. L. M. Gram.
One million dollars were spent by
industry and government agencies
for work in the Department of Engi-
neering Research, headed by Prof.
A. E. White during the past year.
The Department coordinates re-
search of all the phases of engineer-
ing.
Ten thousand students were trained
throughout the state, and 1,800 on
campus by the Engineering, Science,
and Management War Training Pro-
gram, under R. H. Sherlock, which
meets deficiencies in engineers,
chemists, and physicists in essential
industries.
Patton, Hodges Honored
WASHINGTON, Dec. 9.- ()--
Lieutenant-Generals George S. Pat-
ton and Courtney H. Hodges, com-
manders of the Third and First
American Armies, respectively, have
been awarded Oak Leaf clusters for
their distinguished service medals.
CLASSIFIE D
DIR ECTORY
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Army identification bracelet.
Name: Donald L. Scherf, 36572855.
Sentimental value. 5 packs Camels
reward. Phone 4642.
LOST-Brown Schaeffer pen. Name
engraved. Gold band. Call Marian
Mandshain 94471, Room 3519.
LOST-Brown alligator billfold in
November. Finder keep billfold,
mail snapshots to Room 333 Good-
ison, Ypsilanti.
LOST-Blue billfold in campus post
office Nov. 28. Valuable papers.
Reward. Mrs. Glass. 516 E. Madi-
son.
LOST: Garnet coat-of-arms pin. Per-
sonal value. Ample reward. Bar-
bara Brady. 2-3225.
LOST: Saphire ring in League De-
cember 8. Call Pat Wilson, 4786.
Reward.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-"Practice of Medicine"
by Tice. Latest edition, never us-
ed. Complete set of 10 volumes
$50 cash. Phone 9485.
NESTOR JOHNSON hockey skates.
Good. Very reasonable. Call 5977.
HELP WANTED
WANTED - College boys as waiters
in League house. Apply at 915 Oak-
land. Mrs. Zimmer.

A FOLLETT'S
YOU CAN ORDER

Shift of Labor .
out of Vicinity
Not increasi n
"We have not noticed any appre-
ciable increase in movement from
Washtenaw County jobs on the part
of factory workers," Lawrence Ham-
berg said yesterday commenting on
reports of 'mass worker migration
from state industrial areas to upper
Michigan counties.
He explained that there has beeen
a slow flow of workers back to their
homes either in the South or in up-
state counties, from this area.
Reports from Detroit to the Daily
have stated that there is a definite
"back-home movement" now caus-
ing labor shortages in many of the
state's leading industries.
Returning families were quoted as
leaving industrial areas, especially
Detroit, because of dislike for "city
life, high costs of living," and a de-
sire to enjoy outdoor life a
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GLORIA WALTER EUGENE
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POW's Aren't Pampered
PARIS, Dec. 9-(P)-German pris-
oners are neither pampered nor per-
secuted-and they are not receiving
ny American cigarettes, members of
a U. S. House Military Affairs com-
mittee reported today

BOND PREMIERE - BOB lOPE "PRINCESS AND THE PIRATE"

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