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December 03, 1944 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-12-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DEC. 3, 1944

First Post-War
Council Panel to
Be Wednesday
'Big Five, Little Fifty'
Is Discussion Subject
"The Big Five and the Little Fifty"
is the title of the first panel on the
Dumbarton Oaks Conference to be
presented by the Post-War Council
at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Mich-
igan League, Gloria Rewoldt, council
president, announced yesterday.
The panel will form a miniature
United Nations council. Discussion
will center on the problems of the
creation of an international organi-
zation made up of big and small
nations.
Prof. Wilcox of the history depart-
ment will present a background for
the discussion, Prof. Kiss of the
geography department will give the
case of the small nations and Prof.
Dorr, the political science depart-
ment, of the large nations.
The talks will be followed by a!
discussion among the professors and
an open question and answer period.
The council has sent special invi-
tations to foreign students on campus
to attend the panel. All students and
faculty members are urged to attend
the meeting and participate in the
discussion.
University of Utah Plant
Threatens (greenhouse
SALT LAKE CITY, DEC. 2-(/P)-
For two decades a rubber tree, re-
mained a tiny plant in a flower pot
until transplanted to the University
of Utah greenhouse four years ago.
Now, despite severe pruning, it
branches touch the greenhouse roof
and threaten two walls. Employes
are eyeing an axe, but hope to find
another solution.

U' Is Host to
Dr. Y. G. Caen,
Noted Educator
Dr. Y. G. Chen, president of Nan-
king University, will speak at 8 p. m.
Wednesday in Rackham Amphithea-
tre on "To Win the Peace as a Chi-
nese Professor Sees It."
Active in the scientific, educational
and social fields, Dr. Chen received
his M. A. and Ph. D at Columbia Uni-
versity, returning in 1922 to teach in
China. He hastbeen president of
Nanking University since 1927.
Dr. Chen, who is in this country
as a guest of the Department of
State, has been a member of the
People's Political Council since 1938
and is vice-chairman of the Interna-
tional Committee of Chinese Indu-
strial Cooperatives.
He will be the guest of the Inter-
national Center at its regular Sunday
evening program and speaks at 7-30
p. m. today at the Center.
The League needs boys to work
in the cafeteria in the morning
and at noon, in the ballroom cafe-
teria at noon and in the evening,
and in the soda bar in ,the after
noon and evening. Applications
should be made to Mrs. Clark in
the Manager's Office.
'AsSIFIED
DIR ECTORY

Holland Opens TJ' Spanish Club
Will Discuss
Mexican Life

Organist Features
Bach Today at Hill
Opening the annual series of
School of Music student recitals,
David Holland, organist, will high-'
light his program at 4:15 p.m. Sun-
day in Hill Auditorium with the well-
known Bach "Chorale-Preludes."
A pupil of Palmer Christian, Hol-
land entered the University in Feb-
ruary, 1943, He had earned the B.A.
degree at Fisk University, Nashville,
Tenn., and then taught choral music
in the Evansville, Ind. public schools
for four and one-half years.
Holland will also play Handel's
"Concerto in D minor," "Au Soir de
l'Ascension du Seigneur" by Benoit,
"Vexilla Regis" (from Five Pieces on
Gregorian Themes) by Purvis and a
Bach "Prelude and Fugue in' D
major."
This recital is presented in partial
fulfillment of the requirements for
the degree of Master of Music and is
open to the public.

"Una Noche Mexicana" will be the
program presented by La Sociedad
Hispanica at 8 p. m. Wednesday in
the Michigan League, Ann Terbrueg-
gen, president, announced yesterday.
Toni Rowland and Ann Terbrueg-
gen, who spent the past summer in
Mexico, and Herman Hudson, who
visited there a year ago, will describe
their experiences for the Club. Mex-
ican music will be featured, and the
meeting will break up into small dis-
cussion groups to practice speaking
Spanish.
Servicemen and all those interested
in Spanish are cordially invited.
special classes in typewriting, for
personal or office usc. Hours ar-
ranged at your convenience. Day
and Evening Classes. Phone 7831 or
call at our office for details. No
obligation.
HAMILTON Business College

ANGELL HALL-Constructed in 1924, the million dollar building was intended to be first of a pro-
posed Literary College quadrangle, whose completion awaits post-war developments. The inset con-
trasts an early college building with Angell Hall, which houses offices and classrooms of the Literary
College.
POST W AR I EXPANSION:
Angell Hall Is First of Planned Literary uad

william at State

Ph. 7831

E

CARROLL

I'

GLENN

Christmas Cards
Stationery
Student Supplies
Typewriters rented and
repaired.

By PAUL SISLIN
"Classes were held wherever rooms
could be found . . . Some classes were
not held at all because of lack of{
room, while other courses were held
in several buildings."
Those were the conditions that
confronted the Literary College Class
of '27 in their freshman year at the
rapidly expanding University of Mi-
chigan. The problem of over'crowd-
ing, which became evident in 1920
when enrollment jumped to 10,000
from the 6,000 students of pre-World
War One days, already had been call-
ed to the attention of the Board of
Regents.
Burton Presents Plan
In 1923 president Marion LeRoy
Burton presented a plan to the Re-
gents for the construction of a build-
ing . to house the Literary College
classes and administration depart-
ments. The plan was similar in
scope to the ambitious post-war pro-

0

0. D. MORRILL

r1

i I

gram designed for the University
last year.
Construction on the building, sub-
sequently named for James Burrill
Angell, president from 1871 to 1909,
was completed in 1924 at a cost of
more than one ,million dollars. In
the 480-foot building are housed
the offices and classrooms of the
various Literary' College depart-
ments and the office of the Dean
of the Literary College, the Presi-
dent and Provost of the University.
However, the ultimate completion
of President Burton's plan awaits
post-war development. The blue-
prints of Albert Kahn, Detroit archi-
tect, provided for the attachment of
two wings, which would eventually
create a quadrangle of Literary Col-
lege buildings. Last year's plan pro-
posed a $1,500,000 building to com-
plete the quadrangle. The new build-
ing would replace University Hall,
Mason Hall and South Wing.
Regents Choose Location
When the Regents were consider-I
ing the location of Angell Hall in
1924, they too were confronted with
the problem of the obsolete build-
ings behind it. The Regents had
intended to preserve Mason Hall,
oldest of the buildings, as a relic of
the old days, but further discussion
brought a change of mind. It was
however felt that preservation of
part of University Hall would push
the building too close to State Street.
It was decided to build Angell Hall
adjacent to those buildings in the
hope of ultimately razing them.
The design of Albert Kahn fol-
lowed severely classical precedents.
The entrance to the portico con-
sists of eight Ionic columns, atop
a wide esplanade of steps. Angell
Hall houses the Rhetoric study
room, the Mathematics and Econ-
omics Library and some of the
University archeological collec-
tions. Designs on the panels of
the entrance were the work of;
BUY W AR BONDS

Ulysses Ricci of New York. The
planting and approaches were
prepared by the landscape archi-
tects. Pitkin and Mott of Cleve-
land.
The classic design of Angell Hall
was selected as more in harmony
with existing buildings-Alumni
Memorial Hall, the President's resi-
dence, Clements Library (then in
process of construction) and Hill
Auditorium.
Other Buildings Are Constructed
Before President Burton died in
1925 the East Physics Building and
Yost Field House were occupied, work
See ANGELL HALL, Page 3
WAR BONDS ISSUED
HERE-DAY OR NIGHT!
Continuous from 1P.M

NOW!

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Brown and gold Schaeffer
pencil Nov. 24 in Natural Science
Building. Will give a package of
Philip Morris or Camels for re-
turn. Helen Dingwall. Tel. 9390.
LOST-RED PARKER PEN. FIND-
ER CALL 5032. ASK FOR RUTH
McMORRIS.
WANTED
WANTED: Part time teacher of type-
writing and Gregg Shorthand.
Phone 3330.
FOR SALE

AMERICAN VIOLINIST
Choral Union Series
Tues., Dec.5
BOSTON SYMPHONY
Monday, Dec. 11, 8:30 P.M.
MESSIAH
Sunday, Dec. 17, 3:00 P.M.
Tickets at

11

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--1'

FOR YOUR EYES!

P; /

FOR YOUR EARS!

/)

I

i

MOOTON COAT-Size 11. High University Musical Society
style. Excellent condition. Call CARROLL GLENN Burton Memorial Tower
Renee Kaufman, 7595, after 6 p.m. --
~a
for C hris7tmas
Ernie Pyle: BRAVE MEN
William Beebe: THE BOOK OF NATURALISTS
Sumner Welles: THE TIME FOR DECISION
Tom Harmon: PILOTS ALSO PRAY ,
Van Wyck Broiks: THE WORLD OF WASHINGTON IRVING
William Ziff: THE GENTLEMEN TALK OF PEACE
Marguerite Bourk-White: PURPLE HEART VALLEY
William Huie: CAN-DO (THE SEEBEES) Q
Perry & Leighton: WHERE AWAY
Elizabeth Goudge: GREEN DOLPHIN STREET
Irving Stone: IMMORTAL WIFE
Givethalyn Graham: EARTH AND HIGH HEAVEN
Ben Ames Williams: LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN
Marguerite Bayliss: THE BOLVINARS
Howard Fast: FREEDOM ROAD
Nevil Shute: PASTORAL 4
Will Durant: CAESAR AND CHRIST
Burns Mantle: BEST PLAYS OF 43-44
Bennett Cerf: TRY AND STOP ME
Allen Smith: LOST IN THE HORSE LATITUDES
THE LAKE SERIES: MICHIGAN-HURON-SUPERIOR 4
BOOKS FOR THE CHILDREN
GAMES AND TOYS ON THE BALCONY 4
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From the
Musical Hit!
mPHIL SILVERS
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