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December 01, 1944 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MliHIGAN DAILY

U' Inter-Racial Group Meets;
Maps Coming Year's Program

and with members of the faculty on
investigating the Negro housing situ-
ation in Ann Arbor, as well as look-
ing into other sources of discrimina-
tion on campus. By sending post
cards to congressmen, taking campus
polls, and holding lectures and for-
ums, the Inter-Racial Association
plans to help in passing the bill in
Congress to make the FEPC a per-
manent organization.
Other Plans Discussed
Other activities for the coming
semester include the campus-wide
distribution of the pamphlet "Races
of Mankind," holding symposiums,
discussions and lectures, with various
guest speakers, in all of which the
aim will be to further inter-racial
unity.
All those interested in inter-racial
problems are urged to join the or-
ganization. The next meeting will
be held Dec. 16 at the Union.
Latin Movies,
To Be Shown
Post-War Council Will
Sponsor Show Today
Three movies dealing with the ed-
ucational problems of Latin Ameri-
can countries will be shown from
7:30 to 8:45 P. m. tonight in the
Rackham Amphitheater.
The movies are the first in a ser-
ies of films to be presented by the
Post War Council.
"Young Uraguay" will picture the
progressive steps Uraguay is making
in education, showing how the young
people live and play and go to school
from the Escuela Primar to the Uni-
versidad.'
The work of the Mexican govern-
ment in bringing education to its
Tarascan people through the train-
ing of local teachers and leaders will
be shown in the film entitled "Mex-
ico Builds a Democracy."
An accurate picture of the educa-
tional systems now operating in the
other American republics will be giv-
en in "Schools To The South."
The movies were obtained by the
Post War Council from the Univer-
sity of Michigan Visual Education
Dept.

FIRST B-29 LEAVES SAIPAN FOR TOKYO-Ground crewmen watch a sthe first B-29 Superfortress
takes off from Saipan for the strike against Tokyo.
PEACETIME MILITARY SERVICE:
Post- War Conscription Disapproved

Highlights
On-Campus ...
Soviet Film Shown .. .
"They Met in Moscow," a Russian-
produced movie will be presented at
8 p. m. today and tomorrow in Rack-
ham Auditorium.
Tickets for the film, sponsored by
the Ann Arbor Council for American-
Soviet friendship, can be obtained at
a State St. bookstore.
Center To Have Tea . . .
Foreign students and their Am-
erican friends are invited to attend
the International Center's tea
dance from4 p. m. to 6 p. m. to-
day.
Y. C. Chen will be the principal
speaker at the Center's regular
Sunday evening program.
Holmes To Speak...,
Prof. R, H. Holmes of the sociology
department will discuss "The Role of
Cooperatives in the Post-War World"
at a dinner party to be held from
5 p. m. to 8 p. m. tomorrow at Roche-
dale Cooperative House, 64t Oxford.
Everyone interested is invited to at-
tend. Eva Boenheim, chairman of
the Inter-Cooperative Council edu-
cational committee, which has ar-
ranged the party, announced.
Religious Services .
Religious services, conducted in
Hebrew and English, will be held
at 7:45 p. m. today at the Hillel
Foundation.
Eugene Malitz, A/S, and Sam
Krohn, '4D, will conduct the ser-
vice, which will end in time for
worshippers to attend the Fire-
side discussion.
Teachers Are Needed
The teaching division of the Bur-
eau of Appointments and Occupa-
tional Information has received re-
quests for teachers in every subject
field on every grade level from forty-
five of the forty-eight states and
from nine countries or territories
outside continental United States.

Church Clubs
Plan Week-End
Entertainments
The Newman Club will hold a
party from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. today
in the clubrooms of St. Mary's Stu-
dent Chapel and all students and
servicemen are invited.
Entertainment is planned for in-
termission' together with refresh-
ments. On the party committee are
A. F. Vonderhaur, USMCR, Mary
Cataret, D. D Morrow and Bob Stev-
enson, USNR.
At the same time the Congrega-
tional-Disciples Guild will hold a
Mixer party in the assembly rooms
of the Congregational Church.
Games and dancing will be the
activities planned. The early time
will permit military personnel to
attend.'
Baptist students and members of
the Roger Williams Guild will have
musical entertainment at.8:30 p.m.
tomorrow at the Baptist Guild House.
Student talent will present numbers
of Chopin, Bach and modern com-
posers.
Michigan
NOW-
"1IN THE
MEANTIME
DARLING"
JEANNE CRAIN
FRANK LATI MORE
EUGENE PALLETTE

Post-war

-iia-

r.nn.qrrintinn 4

ininuary c;uu5c;11lj tluii

"would not be especially helpful to!
peacetime citizenship" was the con-
clusion drawn by a majority of the
members attending the Michigan
Council on Education meeting at Mi-
chigan Normal College Wednesday,
announced Dean James D. Edmon-
son, of the University School of Ed-
ucation.
Training Not a Cure All
Most of the Council members!
agreed that, although they "were
strongly in favor of adequate defense
provision in whatever way is deter-
mined necessary," compulsory mili-
tary training should not be used as
a cure-all for physical and social de-
fects of our youth. They felt that
a line should be drawn between these
aims.
The members suggested that a na-
tional commission be formed of edu-
cational and military leaders to con-
sider the problem of compulsory ser-
vice after the war. At that time it
will be easier to decide just what will
be adequate provisions for defense.
Dean Questions Project
Edmonson himself "questioned the
desiral ility of a year of required ser-
Crisler To Talk
At 'U' Alumni Club
The University Club of New York
will hold its annual football dinner
Dec. 4 at the Sheraton Hotel at
which time they will show the col-
ored film "Michigan on the March"
and a football film of the most out-
standing game which Fritz Crisler
will discuss.
Following the presentation of "The
Messiah" Dec. 17 the Ann Arbor
alumni group will meet at the home
of Gertrude Fiegell for a Christmas
supper.

ivce because it would tend to feder-
alize education and take away com-
munity and state control of the edu-
cational system."
The move of the Michigan Educa-
tional study commission for the ex-
tension of the school program to 14

years was looked on with approval
by the council. The additibnal two
years should include, besides a con-
tinuation of general education, a
program of vocational training for
the majority of students, who do not
attend college.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

FRIDAY, DEC. 1, 1944
VOL. LV, N. 2G6
All notices for The Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the
Assistant to the President, 1021 Angell
Hall, in typewritten form by 3:30 p. m.
of the day preceding its publication,
except on Saturday when the notices
should be submitted by 11:30 a. m.
Notices
To the Members of the Faculty,
College of Literature, Science and
the Arts: The December meeting of
the Faculty of the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and the Arts for the
academic year 1944-45 will be held
on Monday, Dec. 4, 1944, at 4:10 p.m.
in Rm. 1025 Angell Hall.
The reports of the various commit-
tees have been prepared in advance
and are included with this call to the
meeting. They should be retained in
your files as part of the minutes of
the December meeting.
Edward H. Kraus
Agenda
1. Consideration of the minutes of
the meeting of Nov. 6, 1944 (pp.
1108-1116), which were distributed
by campus mail.
2. Consideration of reports sub-

aird . .

(Continued from Page 1)

pacity after 1908 Baird "was always
interested in the football team," ac-
cording to Yost. Baird was last in
Ann Arbor Tuesday when he left for
Kansas City after spending the
Thanksgiving Day holiday here.
Baird was well remembered by ev-
ery Michigan man who came in con-
tact with him. Ernest J. Allmend-
inger, an All-American guard on the
1912-1913 football teams, said "every
Michigan athlete, every Michigan
alumnus, who ever met Baird could
never forget him. He was an out-
standing personality."
Baird's two outstanding gifts to
the University were $77,500 in 1935
and 1936 for the establishment of
the Charles Baird Carillon and a
$34,000 gift for the Thomas M. Coo-
ley Memorial Fountain, opposite the
League, in honor of Michigan's great
Law School dean.
His pocket was always open for
University causes and he was a ready
contributor to the Varsity Band, hos-
pital funds and medical research
funds.
An honorary 'M' Club member,
Baird was also a member of Phi
Beta Kappa. The University con-
ferred an honorary M. A. degree on
him in 1940.

mitted with the call to this meeting.
a. Executive Committee-Professor
E. S. Brown. b. Executive Board of
the Graduate School-Associate Pro-
fessor N. E. Nelson. c. University
Council-Professor J. M. Cork. d.
Senate Advisory Committee on Uni-
versity Affairs-Professor J. K. Pol-
lock. e. Deans' Conference-Dean
E. H. Kraus.
3. Special Order: Eligibility of In-
structors to Vote (p. 1116)-Profes-
sor C. F. Norton.
4. Admission of veteran students.
Recommendations of the Executive
Committee accomparry this communi-
cation.
5. New Business.
6. Announcements.
Notice: Attention of all concerned,
and particularly of those having of-
fices in Haven Hall, or the western
portion of the Natural Science Build-
ing is directed to the fact that park-
ing or standing of cars in the drive-
way between these two buildings is
prohibited because it is at all times
inconvenient and even dangerous to
ether drivers and to pedestrians on
the diagonal and other walks. If
members of your family call for you,
especially at ncon when traffic both
on wheels and on foot is heavy, it is
especially urged that the car wait for
you in the parking space adjacent to
the north door of University Hall.
Waiting in the driveway blocks traf-
fic and involves confusion, inconven-
ience and danger just as much when
a person is sitting in a car as when
the car is parked empty.
University Senate Committee
on Parking
Students possessing deposit re-
ceipts for tickets to the Michigan-
Purdue football gane are ,reminded
that these receipts become void after
today, and no refunds will be made
after that date.
H. 0. Crisler
Director of Athletics
Faculty, College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts : The civilian
freshman five-week progress reports
will be due Dec. 9 in the Office of the
Academic Counselors, 108 Mason
Hall.
Forestry Assembly: There will be
an assembly of the School of Forestry
and Conservation in Rm. 2039 Nat-
(Continued on Page 4)

:. ®

/
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"They e nMoscow"
MERRY MUSICAL ROMANCE
RUSSIAN SONGS!
RUSSIAN DANCES!
(an ARTKIMO picture)

.,/;
'>2
/

Also
Once Over Lightly
Outdoor Living
Cartoon News

ti

RACKHAM HALL, DEC.
at 8 P.M.
TICKETS AT WAHR'S

1& 2

0

..
l __

-Ii

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

engraved on gold top.
9764. Reward.

Call Janet

SOME
FINERECORDINGS
Recenitly .Received!
SCHUBERT: NINTH SYMPHONY
Bruno Walter and London Symphony
DM 602 ........................... $6.82

CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In.
crease of 10c for each
additional five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease .of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: RED PARKER FOUNTAIN
PEN. REWARD.
LOST-Brown and gold Schaeffer
pencil Nov. 24 in Natural Science
Building. Will give a package of
Philip Morris or Camels for re-
turn. Helen Dingwall. Tel. 9390.
LOST : Black Schaeffer pen. Name

LOST-Silver identification bracelet
with Corinne engraved on it. Call
2-4561. Corinne Azen.
WANTED
WANTED: Typing. 10c per page.
Write Mrs. Hoover, 117 Cass Ave.
Vassar Mich. for information.
FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE APARTMENTS in
Pittsfield Village. Unfurnished
apartment homes now available.
Light airy apartments, each com-
plete with electric refrigerator, 4-
burner gas range, automatic hot
water, etc. All city conveniences at
hand. Rentals from $50 to $62
monthly. Drive out Washtenaw
Road to Pittsfield Village or go by
bus, which stops right at the vil-
lage. 6 minutes from Ann Arbor.
Privately owned and managed.
Available to selected tenants re-
gardless of occupation. Open daily
9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Sundays, 3 p. m.
to 7 p. in.

k'

MICHIGAN MEN... NOTE!
How About MakingI
Saturday a ea Evening
II
For Your Date?
Before the formal, take her to
the ALLENEL for a delicious
.dinner served in a pleasant at-
mosphere. Come on, men, let's
give her a bang-up time!

SCHUBERT: QUARTET IN A MINOR
Budapest String Quartet
DM 225......
CHOPIN: POLONAISES
Arthur Rubinstein
DM 353...........
DVORAK: FOURTH SYMPHONY
Talich and Czech Philharmonic
D M 304 .................. .
DVORAK: SLAVONIC DANCES
Talich and Czech Philharmonic
M 310 .

$4.72
$8.92
$5.77
$4.72

I

_;

4

CohtinuousShowsI
Daily from 1:30 P.M.W H TN

MATINEES . . 25c
NIGHTS . . . . 30c
SERVICEMEN . I6c

1

V.

LAST TIMES TODAY
Tops in Iillbilly Musicals! 67
"I'M FROM ARKANSAS" 1ho

TRIGGER LAW"
Cot Gibson - Bob Steele

I

j
i

STARTS SATURDAY!
Il6oSPOONFUL TLN IES...
anLOEWLYAOONE
EDDIEDEW

5 DAYS
Rent a Bike for
a semester

1 1

RACHMANINOFF: SECOND SYMPHONY
Ormandy and Minneapolis Symphony
DM 239................
HOLDA. . . ad in Lighter Vein .
HOLIDAY INN
Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, etc.
Decca 306 ......$
Maywe suggest that you shop now while so many
-. desirable items are still available.

AVOID LONG COLD
WALKS TO CLASSES
A SPECIAL SEMESTER

.

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