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November 30, 1944 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUR~DAY, NOV. 0, 1944

- - - -, . . -, - - ,S L rA , A SA LS. S.

He liger

c eud s

mary

As

Hockey

Basketball CoachPlaces
Gridders in Two Groups
Lund, Five Others Work Out in Field House;
Coach Fisher Directs Ten Remaining Players

Michigan's basketball squad took
on a decided football flavor yester-
day with the revelation by Head
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan of the
names of six gridders working with
the squad in the Field House plus 10
more in a separate group under the
tutelage of Coach Ray Fisher in the
I-M building.
Heading the list are two veterans
of last season, letter winner Don
Lund who held down a starting guard
assignment throughout the season,
and forward Bruce Hilkene, a re-
serve last winter. Others practicing
with the squad are Jack Veisen-
burger, Bill Roper, Roger Ely, and
Cecil Freihofer, all newcomers to the
Wolverine basketball scene.
Gridders Defeated
In Fisher's group are Charles
Sampson, Bill Redmond, Tom Swift,
Tom Peterson, Howard Yerges, Jack
1Eackstadt, Joe Ponsetto, Maurice
Dunne, Art Renner, and Dick Pat-
rick. Renner is the only member
of this contingent with previous cage
experience at Michigan, having been
a reserve last year. Oosterbaan in-
dicated that some of these men will
CLASSIFIED
DIR E CTORY
HELP WANTED'

be promoted to the regular squad at
they demonstrate sufficient ability.
As all of the footballers are severa
weeks behind the rest of the squad
as far as basketball conditioning goes
it is probable that none of them wil
break into the lineup for at least
two or three weeks. That they are
not yet ready to compete with the
rest of the squad was demonstrated in
a scrimmage yesterday afternoon in

WANTED-2 STUDENT BOYS TO
HELP FROM 5:30 TO 7:30 WITH
WORK IN STUDENT HOUSE.
PLUS SMALL REMUNERATION.
CALL BETWEEN 10 AND 3 AT
2-6112.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: One gold identification brace-
let engraved Ann Siroto. Call same
at 24561.
LOST: Black Schaeffer pen. Name
engraved on gold top. Call Janet
9764. Reward.
LOST-Silver identification bracelet
with Corinne engraved on it. Call
2-4561. Corinne Azen.
WANTED
'WANTED: Typing. 10c per page.
Write Mrs. Hoover, 117 Cass Ave.
Vassar Mich. for information.
LEICA or CONTAX wanted. Also
lens extension tubes. Drop card
Maurice Wing, Grass Lake, Mich.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Tuxedo, size 37. Brand
new, $25.00. Overcoat, tan, size
37. Long. Ercellent condition.
$15.00. Tel. 26194.
Why not p
REMEMBER
OBIRTHDAYS ry
with FLOWERS
... and why not buy .,
I them where you can
get the finest!
O CHELSEA 8
FLOWERS SHOPw
203 East Liberty

Cadet Middle
Daily All-Big Ten Team
Lines Even,
FIRST TEAM SECOND TEAM
Roger Laubenheimer (Wis.) E Bob Ravensburg (Ind.) Figures Say
Frank Ciolli (Ind.) T Vii Willis (Ohio State) I
Ray Justak (Northwestern) G GEORGE BURG (MICH.)
George Bujan (Ill.) C John Tavener (Ind.) srages infHeGgtta
s Ralph Serpico (Ill.) C ill Hackett (Ohio State) Weight Are Similar
MILAN LAZETICH (MICA.) T Rudy Sikich (Minn.)
Jack Dugger (Ohio State) E BRUCE HILKENE (MICH.) By The Associated Press
BALTIMORE, Nov. 28.-If linemen
JOE PONSETTO (MICH.) QB Earl Girard (Wis.) have anything to do with the out- I
l Leslie Horvath (Ohio State) HB ROBERT NUSSBAUMER (MICH.) come of football games-and there's
Claude Young (I.) LIB Wayne Williams (Minn.) a rumor going around that the boys
B( e(up front do have a bearing in such
Boris lDimancheff (Purdue) FB BOB WIESE (MICII.) contests-then the Army-Navy clash
HONORABLE MENTION-ENDS: ART RENNER and DICK RIFEN- Saturday in Municipal Stadium
BURG, MICHIGAN; Frank Bauman, Purdue; Max Morris and Duane stacks up an an even-stephen affair.
Sickels, Northwestern. TACKLES: CLEM BAUIM AN, MICHIGAN; Rus- In physical equipment, two sets
sell Thomas, Ohio ┬žate; Lester Bingaman, Illinois. GUARDS: QUENTIN of stalwarts could hardly be more
SICKELS,MICHIGAN; Nick Collias, Wisconsin; Charles Bennett, North- evenly matched that the forward
western. CENTERS: HAROLD WATTS, MEICHIGAN; Gordon Appleby, walls of the Middies and Cadets.
Ohio State. BACKS: Bob Hoernschemeyer, Indiana; EUGENE DERRI- The Army has four six-footers in
COTTE, MICHIGAN; Harry Jagade, Indiana; Jerry Thompson, Wiscon-!its starting line. So has Navy.
sin; Bob Brugge and Dick Flanagan, Ohio State. Average height of the Army for-
si;B ------n ---F - - Owards is six feet and 3/7 inches.
That for Navy is six feet 3/14 inches,
GUS ZXILMITCKIEOZ, FB: ahdtIsfernf practically nothing.
When you get into the weight
Mr. Average Fan Is Confused department, the similarity is even
more pronounced. Army's great line
By Flo o AII-Am e Lweighs a total of 1,351 pounds, Navy's
B y Flood of -wierica Lists 1,350-a difference of a single pound
_ spread over seven men.
By BILL MULLENDORE Those figures, of course, are for the
scramble is something closely re- lineups which have started the last
Someone, the name does not mat- sembling chaos. We have All-Am- few games, but even down through
ter, once said that there are as many cricans, Little All-Americans, All the host of substitutes the similarity
All-American teams as there are Hard-to-Pronounce, All-Irish, All- of height and weight prevails.
sports writers. While this observa- German, and All Half-a-Dozen oth- Probable Linemen
tionmit onth exte er things, elevens. And in the end ETheCadetsfrom West Point are !
side, it is undoubtedly true that theI nobody pays very much attentionIexctdosarensEm dR-
fa o aigAlAeiashsto any of them, falko of Stoughton, Mass., and Dick
become a national pastime in recent Instead of having 11 players singl- Pitzer of Connellsville, Pa.: tackles
years. ed out as the best in their positions, Arch Arnold of Fort Lewis, Wash.,
Now that the football season isIthe American football fan is con- and Al Nemetz of Prince George, Va.;
practically over, the flood of dream fronted with a bewildering list of guards John Green of Shelbyville,
teams has already begun to swamp names which by their very number Ky., and Joe Stanowicz of Hacketts-
the newspapers and magazines, don't mean a thing. And before the town, N.J., with Bob St. Onge of For-
creating a brand of confusion equall- "experts" have subsided in their est Hills, N.Y., at center.
ed in athletics only by the ever- frenzy practically every college in the Navy's starters probably will beI
lasting argument as to who is heavy- nation can boast of at least one "All- ends Leon Bramlett of Clarksdale,1
weight restln s chmpinos, in-American. Miss., and John Hansen of South
world. Press services, magazines, in-,The situation as it now stands is Orange, N.J.; tackles Don Whitmore
dividual. sports writers, and just laughable to say the least. The ap- of Decatur, Ala., and Gail Gilliam
guys named Joe sit down to their pellation "All American," which used of Eastland, Tex.; guards Stan Tur-i
typewriters, pound out a list of names to signify just that, now carries a ner of Highland Park, Ill., and Capt. 1
they have heard somewhere, and rather hollow significance, for the Ben Chase of San Diego, Calif., and
proudly proclaim their efforts as the various inter-sectional rivalries, na- Jack Martin of Toledo, O., at center.
only official All-American. Every- tural favoritisms and prejudices, e Called Tightest Line
body wants to get into the act. al have made unanimous choice a Navy has been touted all year as
The net result of this mad ; rarity for any player, no matter how boasting the tightest line in the
----- _--- _ good he may be. In fact, it is pro- country, and in three of its eight
bably true that All-Americans are games that forward wall has held the
made by their publicity, not by their opposition to minus yardage on the
ability. At least, that is the only ground. But against Army it will
a explanation for some of the weird, face the finest array of backs it has
selections made in recent years. seen all year-just as those Army
sAAs a remedy, one might suggest backs will be up against the toughest
some sort of a national system in line they've attempted to shred.
Awnsivers" ( Yeswhich all of the various All-Ameri--
cans were brought together, the re- t
suts tabulated, and the final con-GHitsI
Ray Fisher, Michigan's "coach of census taken as the real All-Am-
all sports," is back at one of his old erican. Such a scheme would nar-
jobs this fall, that of assisting with row the final selection down to 11 tan,
the tutorin gof the basketball squad. men, as it should be, and would
Before wartime rules lifted the re-
sttonprevtin frues iftethme fr represent the collective opinion of OSU Coach Sees Rule
strictions preventing freshmen from Ithe nation's sports experts, if that
competing on varsity squads, Fisher term may be applied in an all-in- As 'Professionalizing'
handled the freshman basketball elusive sense. f
team, so the job will not be exactly As for the large numcer of off- CLEVELAND-()-Refusal of the
new to him. shoots of the All-American system, Western Conference faculty commit-
"The Vermont Schoolteacher" is sotstheAdi -Amricanh.ysemy tee to allow its members to play in
let them die a quiet death. Very
listed in the coaching directry as few people care a great deal whether the Rose Bowl turns over to south-
Head Baseball Coach, but that does ern schools big gate receipts that are
not begin to describe his many acti-z Gus Zxilmickiez of Hotchkiss Cor- emshosbgatrcipshtae
itesin the dMicrhin ay ticd- ners Tech is the nation's fullback used to "professionalize" the game,
vities in the Michigan athletic de- with the most unpronouncable name, declares Ernie Godfrey, assistant
partment. Fisher has at various times or that Notre Dame can place only football coach at Ohio State Uni-
done duty as an assistant footballAv rsity.
coah ad tis eaon anded heone man on the All-Irish eleven. Ivriy
coach and this season handled the Football is supposedly a sport, not a Godfrey made the statement last
Junior Varsity squad when J-V coach circus. night in addressing the annual ban-
Art Valpey was away on scouting mis- _Iquet of the Ohio State Alumni Club
sions. In addition, Fisher for many Q t aof Cleveland.
years has taken charge of program' Wolverine Quarterback "It's the hardest thing we have to
distribution at all Wolverine home Got Letter at Ohio State fight," he said in urging that Ohio
ganes. high school boys attend college in
Howard Yerges, who saw quite aj their home state.
Dick Walterhouse Shines little action in a Michigan football a
uniform this fall as understudy to

As Placekicker for Army quarterback Joe Ponsetto, was play- AT
ing before familiar faces in the Ohio
Local football fans will have more State game. Yerges earned a letter
than usual interest in the Army- at State as a quarterback last season
Navy game Saturday because of the being transferred to Michigan in the
sf Dhiny n fik Wnaterhouse for- IT-19 nrrm V OU CAN ORDER

New Coach Is Former
Wolverine Star Athlei
Puck Schedule Is Indefinite; Practice Starts
As Soon as Heyliger Arrives in Ann Arbor

e

DON LUND
. ,.,out for cage squad {
which the gridders were handed a
decisive 20-2 shellacking by the reg-
ular first string.
Lund at Center?
Lund and Hilkene are considered
the chief threats to break into the
starting lineup in the near future.
By virtue of having won two letters
for his work on the hardwood at a
guard position, Lund will probably
work at that post, although there is
a possibility that he will be tried
as a center to relieve the talent
shortage at the position.
Most of the other gridders bring
good high school records with them,
and at least one, Ely, has a name
to live up to. His father, Gilbert Ely,
ranks as one of Michigan's basketball
greats for his work with the 1922
and '23 outfits.
Stick to Lineup
In spite of the influx of talent
created by the closing of the grid
campaign, the Wolverines will ad-
here to the same lineup which took
the floor against Romulus and Cen-
tral Michigan with Keith Harder and
Ted Berce at forwards, Don Mullaney
at center, and Don Lindquist and
George Kell at guards for the game
with Western Michigan Saturday.
Western, which took two decisions
from the Wolverines last winter, got
off to a flying start last week by
trouncing the Kellogg Field quintet,
45-33. The Broncos have lost all
of last year's squad which rated as
one of the finest in the Mid-West,
but are expected to provide an in-
teresting evening for Michigan nev-
ertheless.
Coach Buck Read's aggregation
boastsat least one name player in
the person of Glen Selbo, formerly
of Wisconsin, who held down a start-
ing forward berth on the Badger,
quintet last season and was one of
Wisconsin's leading scorers. In addi-
tion, Read has several promising
freshmen.

By RUTH ELCONIN
Victor Heyliger, former University
of Michigan hockey star and coach
of the University of Illinois puck
team for two years, was named yes-
terday to succeed Eddie Lowrey as
hockey mentor by Athletic Director
Fritz Crisler.
Heylinger, a native of Concord,
Mass., played under Lowry during
the years 1935-36-37 and held down
the center position on the Wolver-

VIC HEYLIGER
... returns as coach.
ine ice team. He gained a reputa-
tion as, one of the best hockey play-
ers ever to don a Michigan uniform
and was chosen all Mid-West center
in 1937.
During his years on the puck squad
he established a three-year intercol-
legiate scoring record by netting 116
goals. While attending the univer-
sity, Heyliger not only won major
awards in hockey, but also played
in the outfield on the Wolverine base-
ball team.
After his graduation in 1937, Mi-
chigan's new hockey coach played
with the Chicago Black Hawks hold-
ing down the same spot as he did
on the Michigan ice team. Two years

WAR BONDS BOUGHT HERE RECEIVE
FREE TICKETS FOR "PRINCESS AND THE PIRATE"
WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE! DAY OR NIGHT
Continuous from 1 P.M
TODAY and FRIDAY!
'IEvelynAnkVr S SU E I
JON HALL. Alan Curtbs
> < Evelyn Ankers,

I-

LEON ERROL
COMEDY

11

Extra Added
CHAMPIONS
OF FUTURE

Coming
Saturday!

W W-

k

"---w Iv-

--s -

-- --

- -- ..-

JS tt
-~ ~ at - --

f"

presence oz ijim wca. LJ~.flV v ,, j
mer Ann Arbor High grid star, on the
Army squad. Walterhouse has de-
veloped into a place-kicking star at
West Point and is the leading point-
after-touchdown converter on the
squad. In the event of a close game,
his educated toe could be a decisivej
factor in the outcome.
Michigan3
NOW-
"IN THE
MEANTIME
DARLING"
JEANNE CRAIN
FRANK LATIMORE

V .LG ~ ' iiii F v v~ ev r

4
4

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TONIGHT 8:30
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ORATORICAL ASSN.
presents
1111111 DIH
FIRST TIME
LECTURE
PLATFORM
p s
.... . . . . .4
From ..

5 DAYS
Rent a Bike for
a semester!
AVOID LONG COLD
WALKS TO CLASSES

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