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November 29, 1944 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-29

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THE IMICHIGAN DAILY _-N

British

War Sacrifices

Revealed in

White Paper

British Fear
160 Fatalities
In Bomb Blast
Rescuers Recover 29
godies from Debris
By The Associated Press
BURTON-ON-TRENT, ENGLAND,
NOV. 28-Rescue work among the
craters of the RAF's bomb depot near
here led to fears tonight that more
than 10 persons might have died in
the explosion which shook the
countryside yesterday.
The estimate of the dead was made
by the British Press Association,
which reported 23 bodies had been
recovered from debris of the ammu-
ntion store. Rescue workers stated
that another 100 bodies might be bu-
ried there, while 31 were known to
have been crushed in the collapse of
an adjoining plaster works. Six
bodies have been brought out of the
factory.
After preliminary proceedings, an
inquest over seven of the bodies was
adjourned indefinitely: A coroner in-
dicated it might be some time before
the inquiry was resumed.
Germans Suggest V-Weapon
The 'Bratislava radio in a German
language broadcast said flatly that
"yesterday's explosion in Derbyshire
was caused by a German V-weapon."
Earlier, unofficial reports, speculat-
ed that the number of dead would
reach perhaps more than 250.
More than 24 hours after the explo-
sions-starting . apparently from a
single bomb and then spreading
swiftly-the search continued for
those missing. American troops were
among the rescuers.
CLA SSIFIED
DIRECTORY
HIELP WANTED
WANTED-2 STUDENT BOYS TO
HELP FROM 5:30 TO 7:30 WITH
WORK IN STUDENT HOUSE.
PLUS SMALL REMUNERATION.
CALL BETWEEN 10 AND 3 AT
2-6112.
FOR RENT
SINGLE or double room for graduate
student or University business girl.
Call 2-6468 between 6 p.m. and 8
p.m., evenings.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Silver identification bracelet
with Corinne engraved on it. Call
2-4561. Corinne Azen.
LOST-Black and white striped
Schaeffer pen. Sometime Satur-
day, Nov. 18. Believe in vicinity
of Natural Science Bldg. or li-
brary. Reward. Call Marian Say-
ward, 2-4561.
WANTED
WANTED: Typing. 10c per page.
Write Mrs. Hoover, 117 Cass Ave.
Vassar Mich. for information.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Tuxedo, size 37. Brand
new, $25.00. Overcoat, tan, size
37. Long. Ercellent condition.
$15.00. Tel. 26194.

Five Year
Civilan
Toll Given
Casualty Aggregate
Equals 733,030
By The Associated Press
LONDON, NOV. 28-(A')-The cost
of Britain's five years of total war--
the normal life.of the nation obliter-
ated, 1.5 per cent of the whole popu-
lation casualties, the riches stored
up by past generations dissipated-
was described to the world today in
a government white paper.

CLARK'S FIFTH ARMY:
75 Percent of Motor "Transports
Rebuilt from, .Damaged Ones

t
i
e
C
e
t
I

'I HAVEN'T SEEN OUR BABY YET' CLUB MEETS IN FRANCE-
Charter members of the IHSOBY, "I Haven't Seen Our Baby Yet,"
club compare notes and pictures of their children at the Brittany Red
Cross Club in France.
DETROIT SUGGESTION:'
Board Proposes To Abolish War
Restrictions on Foreign Trade
WASHINGTON, NOV. 28-()- and British officials which would re-
Abolition of all wartime restrictions strict foreign trade.
on foreign trade as soon as practic- f
able is urged by the Foreign Affairs These agreements, said the Coi-
Committee of the Detroit Board of mittee, prohibit American labor from
commerce. trading with certain areas of the
"Themembers (of our committee) world, prohibit American citizens
feel confident that they can cope with from receiving passports to these re-
any foreign government purchasing stricted areas without approval of
commission and that our govern- the British Board of Trade and re.-
ment need not establish any pro- quire mail of American citizens to be
tective agency for our benefit," the routed through British censors in
Committee stated in a letter address- Washington and New York.
ed to Michigan congressmen and in- "Mr. La Varre indicated that our
serted in the Congressional Record government has a plan in which an
by Rep. Michener (R.-Mich.) agency of the U. S. Government
The Committee suggested investi- would directly control all export and
gation of reports by William La- import trade," the letter stated. "This
Varre, Director of the American For- would completely eliminate any pos-
eign Service Council, of three exist- sibility of a corporation or citizen
ing agreements between Washington engaging in such business."

Grim statistics told the story of J. '
the United Kingdom's war contribu-
tion:
Total casualties of 733,030, includ- RAID LEADER---Col. Walter C.
ing - 136,115 civilians killed and Sweeney, Jr., (above), 35, of Whee-
wounded and 29,629 merchant sea-I ling, W.Va., son of Maj.-Gen.1
men killed; the export trade, basis Sweeney of San Francisco, led the
of Britain's wealth and power-vir- second B-29 Superfortress raid ont
tually abandoned; overseas gold re- Tokyo.
serves spent on war materials; one
home in three damaged and one in WITH THE AEF:
30 destroyed; more than 5,500 fac- T HEA l
tories damageds"monotonous diet;
strictly rationed clothing; high taxes. only Job Is To
"We have sacrificed most of our
Victorian inheritance," said Minister 'hoot Folks'
of Information Brendan Brachen in i
a press conference after the release
of the document. "What was the Doughboy Says
treasure of our grandfathers has *'
gone, and it has been well and gladly
sacrificed." WITH THE AEF ON THE WEST-
Britain, he said, gave up her ex- ERN FRONT, Nov. 24., (Delayed)-
port business at the start of the war (P)-Everybody's getting a kick out
and converted the whole of her man- of the story about the major and the
power to the making and using of mountaineer. It seems a rear echelon
war goods. Her workers since have major visited the front the other day
produced more than 102,000 planes,' vnitethefsontsetr day
25,000 tanks, 35,000 guns, 5,700 ships. in the 26th division sector. He was
In five years her people have paidI one of those officers,who ask lots of
approximately $15,900,000,000 in in- stiff questions.
come tax and other direct taxes and When he met the lanky, slow-
have turned over to the government talking Tennessee hill - country
approximately $19,248,000,000 in per- doughboy, he promptly asked his
sonal savings.
s"nhe sVictis, "name, outfit, location, and the sort
"The Victorians, "Bracken observed',fjbh a.Temuti o
"were proud to be called a nation of of job he had. The mountain boy
shopkeepers, but there never have seemed slow to answer and the major
been such shopkeepers as the British. barked: "What do you do? What do
No shopkeepers ever before sold out you do?"
their entire stocks in order to fight." "Well, now, sir," said the moun-
Bracken said that Britain's large taineer, leaning on his rifle and spit-
gold reserves in the United States at( ting carefully downwind out of defer-
the beginning of the war "have all ence to the major's highly polished
been paid over and the money spent boots, "Well, now, sir, there don't
in building up American munitions rightly seem to be nothing much
industries." anybody can do around here excepty
"This expenditure," he added, shoot folks."
"helped America come into the war
with her industries already on some-
thing of a wartime footing. We are
glad to have w~ndered this service to
the United States as a small return
for her tremendous generosity to us."
The white paper, titled "Statistics
relating to the war effort of the Unit-
ed Kingdom," disclosed that Britain
has mustered 59 per cent of all her
men between 18 and 40 in the armed M IC I
forces and has called up 55 per cent
of her women of the same ages for
the military services or for muni-
tions work.
W HITNEY The
Continuous Matinees . 25c
from I Nights . . . . 30c i
1:30 P.M. Servicemen.16c
frm IghsII0.il

FORT WAYNE, Detroit-Seventy-
five per cent of the automotive trans-
port now being used by Lt.-Gen.
Mark W. Clark's Fifth Army in Italy
has been refitted or rebuilt by Army
Ordnance troops from battle-dam-
aged vehicles or from vehicles turned
in for salvage.
Army Ordnance soldiers are pre-
paring a great variety of captured
enemy equipment for use against the
Germans. German 88-mm. guns, for
example, are now being used as inte-
gral parts of Fifth Army artillery.
through salvage and refitting.
Field Ordnance contact parties
operate with forward troops and in-
spect damaged equipment and ma-
terial that is strewn in the wake of
some of the bitterest fighting in this
global war. Repairs that can be made
within four days are handled by
these field Ordnance units, and all
other salvagabl'e equipment is sent
back to a base Ordnance shop.
Besides repairing and refitting,
Ordnancemen are also called upon
for special jobs. Some of their extra-
curricular activities include making
track extensions for mud-stalled
trucks and constructing other heavy
apparatus vitally needed in emergen-
cies.
Supplementing military personnel
and tools, Italian labor and Italian
plants and shops are used extensively
to increase the general efficiency
and to relieve combat troops for
other duties. In some cases, entire
Italian factories with their skilled
employees have been taken over com-
pletely and converted for Ordnance
Bond Drive on Schedule
WASHINGTON, NOV. 28-(A)-
The push toward selling five billion
dollars worth of bonds to individuals
in the Sixth War Loan almost reach-
ed the one-billion mark today.

maintenance, with only a handful
of Fifth Army :personnel in super-
visory capacities. Locally produced
products and materials are utilized
whenever possible to relieve the
strain on military supply channels.
Littell Biddle
Bre ik .in ept.
Of Justice Row
WASHINGTON, NOV. 28-(1)-
Attorney General Francis Biddle was
accused by Assistant Attorney Gen-
eral .Norman M. Littell today of in-
tervening in a Justice Department
case in behalf of Thomas E. (Tom-
my the Cork) Corcoran, onetime
New Deal braintruster now in pri-
vate law practice.
Littell advised senators, it is under..
stood, that the differences between
him and Biddle arose because the
Attorney General followed practices
contrary- to basic principles of good
government. Biddle has demanded
Littell's resignationbut Littell, a
presidential appointee, has not com-
plied.
Littell's assertions concerning Bid-
die were made in a memorandum he
sent to the Senate war investigating
committee which is seeking to deter-
mine whether Biddle's demand for
Littell's resignation was the result
of Littell's testimony before that
committee.
.Denying that was the fact, Biddle
is reported to have informed the
committeethere were many personal
differences between the two. Biddle
said Littell's work in the lands divi-
sion was commendable, but he (Bid-
dle) lacked personal confidence in
his assistant attorney general.

I

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I/44
i%'
,:<,
j:
,

c"T;hey e nMoscow"
MERRY MUSICA L ROMANCE
RUSSIAN SONGS!
RUSSIAN DANCES!
(an ARTKIMO picture)

7/
7/ ':4
/
I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

-

RACKHAM HALL, DEC.
at 8 P.M.
TICKETS AT WAHR'S

1I2

WEENESDAY, NOV. 29, 1944
VOL. LV, No. 24
All notices for The Daily Official Bul-
letin are to be sent to the Office of the'
Assistant to the President, 1021 Angell
Hall, in typewritten form by 3:30 p. m.
of the day preceding its publication,
except on Saturday when the notices
should be submitted by 11:30 a. tn.
Notices
Smoking in University Buildings:
Attention is called to the general
rule that smoking is prohibited in
University buildings except in private
offices and assigned smoking rooms
where precautions can be taken and
control exercised. This is neither a
mere arbitrary regulation nor an
attempt to meddle with anyone's
personal habits. It is established
and enforced solely with the purpose
of preventing fires. In the past year

eight of the total of 20 fires reported
were caused by cigarettes or lighted
matches. To be effective, the rule
must necessarily apply to bringing
lighted tobacco into or through Uni-
versity buildings and to the lighting
of cigars, cigarettes, and pipes within
buildings- including such lighting
just previous to going outdoors. If
the rule is to be enforced at all its
enforcement must begin at the build-
ing entrance. Further, it is impos-
sible that the rule should be enforced
with one class of persons if another
class of persons disregards it. It is a
disagreeable and thankless task to
"enforce" almost any rule. This rule
against the use of tobacco within
"buildings is perhaps the most thank-
less and difficult of all, unless it
shall have the support of everyone
concerned. An appeal is made to all
persons using the University build-
ings-staff members, students and
others-to contribute individual co-
operation to this effort to protect
University buildings against fires.
Please note especially that the
alcove at the rear of the main corri-
dor in University Hall is not a smok-
ing room and should not be used as
such.
This statement is inserted at the
request of the Conference of Deans.
Shirley W. Smith
Communications to the Regents:
Those who wish to present communi-
cations for consideration by the Re-
gents are requested to present them
(Continued on Page 4)
Ending TODAY
Micigan

r:

r

IIA LEAGUE
Ballroom Cafeteria
Reopen Friday Noon

't

''
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ORATORICAL ASSN.
presents
1sek*fe4 a f a 4*4 md ,weeh
FIRST TIME
on the
LECTURE
PLATFORM
From\r
HOLLYWOOD

December

I

Special Luncheon 11:30to 1:00 P.M.

Special Dinner

. 5:30 to 7:00 P.M.

CLOSED
SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS.
EVERYONE WELCOME

THE SPECIALS WILL NOT BE

,,EI II



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