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November 17, 1944 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-17

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THE MICHIGAN-DAILY

FRIDAY, NOV. 17, 1944

_ . _ _

Agencies

To End Shortages of War Materials

0

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, NOV. 16-War Mobilization Director James F. Byrnes
tonight ordered four government agencies to concentrate on ending critical
shortages of some war materials and weapons which if continued might
prolong the war.
Byrnes said that if necessary to overcome these lags he would take
"drastic action" and disclosed that one suggestion he has received is that
he should "completely suspend resumption of production of civilian sup-
plies."
But in a letter to war procurement
agencies he said he had decided to member of the Federal Communica-
defer "such drastic action for a reas- tions Commission, and the nomina-
onable time" in hope the deficiencies tion of Brig. Gen. Frank T. Hines to
could be ended without it. be Retraining and Re-employment
"Much of the manpower trouble Administrator for the war veterans
is. due to the mistaken belief on the program Hines is head of the Vet-
part of some people that the war erans Administration.

Taxes To Increase. ,
At the Capitol, Speaker Rayburn
expressed doubt that Congress will
halt the increase scheduled Jan. 1
in Social Security payroll taxes. They
are due to go up from one to two
percent on both employes and em-
ployers. Senator Vandenberg (R-
Mich.) has proposed that the tax be
continued at one percent. The leg-
islative requirement that tax bills
must originatein the House will bar
Vandenberg from offering formal
legislation, however, unless the House
sends to the Senate some tax meas-
ure to which he could attach his pro-'
posal as an amendment. Admini-
stration fiscal leaders want the tax
to go up.
To Probe Franking....
A study of use of Congressional
free mailing privileges during poli-
tical campaigns was ordered by the
House Campaign Expenditures Com-
mittee. Chairman Anderson (D-NM)
said the committee had received com.-
plaits that millions of pieces of
campaign literature were mailed free
;in the recent campaign. He said
hearings would be held next month
on plugging "loop-holes" in the elec-
tion laws.
Oh, What Yol
Said Mr.FDlI
GLENDALE, Calif., Nov. 16.-(1)-
The Glendale Ministerial Association
said today it had sent a letter to
President Roosevelt asking him to
apologize for what it termed his
"shocking profanity,' while using a
voting machine in the booth on
Election Day as reported by a news
magazine. (Time).
In describing President Roosevelt's
visit to the polls on Election Day, the
news magazine said in last week's
issue:
"From the green-curtained voting
booth came a clank of gears as the
main control lever jerked irritably
back and forth. Then a voice, fa-
miliar to all of the U. S. and to most
of the world, spoke distinctly from
behind the curtains: 'The Goddamn-
ed thing won't work.'"
Boake Carter Dies
HOLLYWOOD, Nov. 16.- (4')-
Boake Carter, writer and news com-
mentator, died tonight shortly after
he was admitted to Hollywood Pres-
byterian Hospital.
Hospital attendants declined to
reveal the cause of death.

Eighth Army
Nears Faenza
On Italian Front
Montone River Reached
In Drive Northward
By The Associated Press
ROME, NOV. 16-Eighth Army for-
ces at the Eastern end of the Italian
battleline reached the Montone River
on a wide front north of Forli and
drove to points less than five miles
from the important highway town of
Faenza, the Allied command an-
nounced today.
British troops were within five
miles of Faenza in the region of San
Martino Di Villafranca and also
southward, where they captured the
town of Petrignone, lying below high-
way nine leading from Forli to Bolo-
gna. They made other important
gains in this region near the import-
ant hill feature Monte Poggiolo.
There was considerable clearing
out of strong enemy rear guards be-
low highway nine near the village of
Villagrappa, after which the Allied
troops pushed 1,000 yards north-
westward to the road along the west
bank of the Bolzanino River.
Farther westward Polish troops
improved their positions north of
the Flrence-Forli road and won
complete control of the important
road.
There were few developments on
the Fifth Army sector, where activity
was limited to patrol action, and
there was little change in the Allied
positions along the Adriatic coast in
the drive on Ravenna.
N ewan Club
To Give Dance
Dancing will be the order of the
evening at the Newman Club party
which will be given from 7:30 to
9:30 p. m. today at the clubrooms in
St. Mary's Student Chapel.
The early time was arranged in or-
der that Navy personnel would be
able to attend. Entertainment is
planned during the intermission and
refreshments will also be served.
A. F. Vanderhaar, USMCR, is on
the entertainment committee and
will be assisted by Uditta Marrow and
Jeannette Drouillard.
Local OPA Offices
Will Move Friday
All local OPA offices are being
moved to 319 S. Main St.. site of the
former Starbuck College Inn and will
be open at the new address next
Friday, John E. Swisher, Washte-
naw's chief rationing clerk said
yesterday.
Due to the scheduled move, all
OPA offices will be.closed next Tues-
day, Wednesday and Thursday, Swi-
sher added.
International Center
To Hold First Tea Today
International Center will hold its
first tea dance of the year from 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. today.
Tea dances, to which all foreign
students and their American' friends
are invited, will be held regularly
throughout the year.
Club Elects Officers
Officers of "Le Cercle Francais,"
elected at the first meeting of the
semester Tuesday, are president, Mrs.
Sara Maycock; vice-president, Made-
line Levenberg; secretary, Evangeline
Shempp; and treasurer, Georges Pet-
rossian.

SERIES TO BEGIN DEC. 4:
Prof. C. Beeker Will Deliver
Annual William Cook Talks
Prof. Carl Becker, eminent American historian, will deliver the annual
series of William W. Cook Lectures on American Institutions Dec. 4 through
8 at the Rackham Building.
"The American Political Tradition" is the title ,of the first of Pro-
fessor Becker's series entitled "Freedom and Responsibility in the American
Way of Life." The initial lecture will be delivered 8:15 p. m. Dec. 4 in
the Rackham Amphitheatre, all others being given at 4 p. m. in the
Amphitheatre.
The other lectures are "Freedom

r

of Speech and the Press," Dec. 5;
"Freedom of Learning and Teach-
ing," Dec. 6; "Constitutional Gov-
ernment," Dec. 7; and "Private Ec-
onomic Enterprise," Dec. 8.
Professor Becker, a member of the
Cornell University faculty, was grad-
uated from the University of Wiseon-
sin. He taught at Pennsylvania Col-
lege, Dartmouth, Kansas and Minne-
sota before going to Cornell in 1917.
The lectures were provided for in'
the will of the late Mr. Cook, who
was graduated from the University.
Bequests by Mr. Cook provided for
both the Law Quadrangle and Mar-
tha Cook residence hall for women.
The William W. Cook Foundation
created a University lectureship on
American institutions.
Past president . of the American
Historical Association, Professor'
Becker. has written "Eve of the Revo-
lution," "Our Great Experiment in
Democracy,' and "Modern Democ-
racy." His'latest volume, published
a year ago, is "How New Will the
Better World Be?"

Movies, Talks
Planned by Post
War Council

MOST RECENT PICTURE OF HITLER TO REACH STOCKHOLM-
The most recent picture of Adolf Hitler to reach Stockholm, the
caption of this German photo serviced by the Swedish picture agency
Pressens Bild described it as "Fuehrer (left), at his headquarters
September 25 greeting Leon DeGrelle (right), Belgian Rexist leader
who received the Knight's Cross to Iron Cross." Man at center was not
identified. (A. P. Wirephoto via radio from Stockholm.)
Stalin "Sets Stage for Reunion'
with Roo.etcvdL Churchill Soon

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A series of educational movies to
be presented twice a month and
alternating with bi-weekly panel dis-
cussions centering on issues of the
Dumbarton Oaks conference were
tentatively planned at a meeting of
the Post-War Council, it was revealed
yesterday.
Students are urged to affiliate
themselvqs with the council and to
attend the panels, Gloria Rewoldt,
temporary chairman, said. An invi-
tation was also exteflded to dis-
charged veterans to take advantage
of council activities.
The Post-War Council, instituted
in 1941, has, as its main function, the
encouragement of thought and dis-
cussion on post-war issues. Besides,
frequent public panels and seminars,
well known speakers are brought to
the campus by the council and polls
are conducted to sample student and
serviceman opinion on current issues.
Mail Christmas Cards
WASHINGTON, NOV. 16--(A)-
Christmas cards to soldiers overseas
should be sent at once to get there
in time, and must be in sealed enve-
lopes, the Army warned today.

r;

.1

WASHINGTON, Nov. 16.- (AP)-
Russia appeared today to be setting
a friendly stage for the forthcoming
meeting of Marshal Stalin with Pres-
ident Roosevelt and Prime Minister-
Churchill.
At the same time, new Moscow
statements on the hitherto hush-
hush subject of Japan may indicate
a psychological preparation for Rus-
sian participation in the second stage
of the war-in the Pacific.
Latest Russian assurances that the
Soviets aim to consolidate the Wash-
ington-London-Moscow front after
the defeat of Germany came in the
official Soviet Embassy Bulletin.
The expected meeting of the big
three leaders was not mentioned, but

<+>
Churchill said recently that the time'
has come for such a conference. It is.
anticipated before Christmas.
Some recently returned officials
have pointed out that only a shortI
time ago, Moscow appeared painfullyI
upset whenever Russia's possible en-
try into the Pacific battle was men-
tioned in the United States or Brit-
ain. Now pointed references about
Japan are coming from the Soviet
capital.
A questionnaire intended to cut
down the number of government
questionnaires is being circulated by
the Budget Bureau.

UIO-PAC May
B e Co ntinued

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

HELP WANTED
GIRLS OR BOYS for several after-
noons to rake leaves. Call 7880.
WANTED-WOMEN TO WORK AS
NURSES' AIDES AND AS HELP-
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OR PART TIME. APPLY PER-
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WANTED-MEN TO DO ORDERLY
WORK AT UNIVERSITY HOSPI-
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PLY AT PERSONNEL OFFICE.
ATTENTION Men Students! Best
meals on campus in exchange for
your services as dishwashers. Call
2-3746.
WANTED-Boy to work in kitchen
in return for board. Contact cook
or manager 1015 E. Huron St.
Phone 23179.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Fountain pen. Green Parker
vacumatic. Please return to
Daily office. Reward.
NOVEMBER 13. Ladies green watch,
rose face, black band. Call Joan
Utley, 2-2243. Generous reward.
LOST-String of pearls between
Kappa annex and Miller's Dairy
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LOST-Combination black leather
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FOR RENT
ATTRACTIVE APARTMENTS in
Pittsfield Village. Unfurnished
apartment homes now available.
Light airy apartments, each com-
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burner gas range, automatic hot
water, etc. All city conveniences at
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Privately owned and managed.
Available to selected tenants re-
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9 a. m. to 5 p. in. Sundays, 3 p. m.
to 7 p. in.

CHICAGO, Nov. 16.--iP)-Remark-
ing that "nothing succeeds like suc-
cess," CIO President Philip Murray
today said, "It is a reasonable as-
sumption" that the controversial Po-
litical Action Committee will be con--'
tinued.
Dissolution of the committee, head-'
ed by Sidney Hillman, president of
the Amalgamated Clothing Workers
Union, had" been, reported in the
cards following the Nov. 7 election.
Its fate is up for discussion in tomor-
row's meeting of the CIO executive
board.
Murray, howeva., would not com-
mit himself definitely at a press
conference following the opening
board meeting today. Hillman will
present his report tomorrow.C
Members, declining to be quoted
by name, were jubilant over what
they termed the "smashing success"
of the PAC, intaiding President
Roosevelt's reelection.
"It is the first time labor has been
politically potent," one said, "it's not
likely that the board will toss. that
out the window."
Murray convened the board this
morning to lay 'groundwork for the
CIO's annual convention starting
Monday.
France...
(ContAued from Page 1)
A front dispatch said the First
Army chose the first break in the
weather to attack, and Hodges was
pictured as confident of success de-
spite the mire and muddy roads.
For days convoys had splashed up
the roads with food and supplies,
guns had been switched to new posi-
tions, and tanks plowed up through
deep mud, ready to support the in-
fantry.
The U. S. Ninth under Lt. Gen.
William H. "Texas Bill" Simpson
slammed against Hitler's homeland
defenses after springing literally
from nowhere into the fight for the
West Wall.
Last heard from more than two
months ago when it seized the Breton
port of Brest, this army had moved
silently through France, Belgium
and Holland in What a front dis-
patch declared was one of the best
strategy stories of the war.

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