100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 12, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-06-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESPlAY, OTN'12, 045

LAKE LIFE STUDY:
Senstius Attempts To Diseover'
Why Erie Is More Produetive

By FRANCES PAINE
"Lake Erie is biologically the most
productive of the Great Lakes; this
means that it produces more fish per
unit area of water than any of the
other Great Lakes," Prof. M. W. Sen-
stius of the Department of Geology
explained in an interview.
In an attempt to find out the
reasons behind this fact, Prof. Sen-
stius is doing research in coopera-
tion with Dr. T. H. Langlois (a Uni-
versity graduate), director of the
biological station of . Ohio State
University. The work is being
carried on at Put-in-Bay on South
Bass Island, Lake Erie.
Several specialists are working on
this problem. One is making a study
of the bacteriology of the sediments;
one is working on the microscopic
animal and plant life of the water;
and Prof. Senstius is studying the
sediments themselves.
The ultimate source of all animal
food is plant life, Prof. Senstius points
out, and plant life in turn is support-
ed by the soil. Thus the sediments
from lake bottoms could be studied
as soils, as supporters of plant life.
The chief items considered in this
study are chemical, mineraligocal,
and mechanical compositions of the
sediments. The scientists also deter-
mine where the sediments come from,
and how they are related to geologi-
cal formations around the lake.
Sample sediments were obtained
by dredging from the area around
the Bass Island group. The char-
acteristics of these samples are
compared with those of similarly
obtained samples from Lake Mich-
igan, which were given to the Uni-
versity by the U. S. Bureau of Fish-
eries. By comparing the informa-
tion on the lake which is very pro-
ductive biologically with that which
is not so productive, Prof. Sen-
IM- nvA

stius hopes to find' a reason for
Lake Erie's high productivity.
Investigations on each sample in-
clude a mechanical analysis for the
percentages of sand, silt and clay; a
qualitative and quantitative miner-
alogical analysis of the sand frac-
tion; and separate determinations of
those elements especially important
for plant growth.
So far, no significant differences
have been found between the min-
eralogical compositions of the sedi-
ments from the two lakes. This
does not necessarily mean that the
chemical composition is also the
same. Prof. Senstius believes there
may be a significant difference in
the nature and composition of the
organic matter content.
It is intended to extend these in-
vestigations to other parts of Lake
Erie and eventually perhaps to the
other Great Lakes. Anticipating
large numbers of samples for analy-
sis, special rapid methods are being
worked out, especially for chemical
analysis. Prof. Senstius hopes that
eventually these studies may be per-
formed by people who are not spe-
cially trained in the higher techniques
of quantitative chemical analysis.
OLD, Draft Boards
WillHold Meetigi

Glee Club, Band
Plan Concert
'radIitional Sing Will
Be I-eld on Thursday
Featuring the Men's Glee Club and
the University Concert Band in con-
cert and swing numbers, the tradi-
tional all-campus sing and band con-
cert will be held at 7:45 p.m. EWT
(6:45 p.m. CWT) Thursday on the li-
brary steps.
The program will' include several
stunt numbers by members of the
Glee Club and popular student con-
ducted selections by the band. "Manx
Overture" by Wood, heard on the
band's recent spring concert, a Gold-
man march, "Shenandoah" and
"American Legion Forever" by Mor-
ton Gould will be played.
Harold Kulbarsh, Raymond Bun-
taine and Jerome Horowitz will be
featured soloists with the glee club
under the direction of Prof.- David
Mattern. Officers for the coning
year will be elected and glee club keys"
will be presented at the final business
meeting of the club today.
Ten ,tudent conductors, substitut-
ing for Prof. Revelli, who is recuper-
ating from a recent operation, will
direct the band program starting at
8 p.m. (7 p.m. CWT).

Ihtallation,
MusicaleWill
Be Held Today'
Thelma Newell., Gladys Simmons,
Mary Masters and the Sigma Alpha
Iota chor, under the direction of
Rose Marie Grentzer, will highlight
the music sorority's annual musicale
tonight in the Assembly Room, Rack-
ham Building.
The musicale will be preceded by
the installation of the alumnae group
as a formal chapter of the national
professional organization. Mrs. Kath-
leen Davison of Ides Moines, Ia., na-
tional president, will conduct the in-
stallation at 7:45 p.m. EWT (6:45
CWT) in the West Conference Room.
Opening the program with two se-j
lections by Wieniawski, Miss Newell,
violinist. formerly on the School of
Music faculty, and her accompanist,
Mrs. Gladys Simmons, will play the
Bach "Air for the G String" and
"Pierrot Gai" (Burlesco) by Tirin-
delli.
A Bach "Bburree," "Giga" by Cor-_
elli and "Scintillation" by Salzedo
will be performed by Miss Masters,
assistant in the School of Music,
while the final numbers will be given
by the chorus.

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

i

No Haven, for Sufferers From Asthma, Hay Fever,
Dr. Jitmencz, Health Service Allergist Observes

The tenth in a series of monthly
pre-induction meetings, conducted by
the Ann Arbor Office of Civilian De-
fense and the Selective Service
Board, will be held at 7:30 p.m. EWT
(6:30 p.m. CWT) today in the small
auditorium of Ann Arbor High
School.
These meetings are held to answer
questions concerning personal and
family problems of servicemen.
NOW SHOWING-

TUES., June 12, 1945
Eastern War Time
7:00--News.
7 :05-Morning Round-Up.
7:30-Musical Reveille.
8:00--News.
8:15-1050 Club.
3:30-Breakfast Melodies.
8:45-Bouquet for Today.
8:55--Musical Interlude.
9:00--News.
9:05--Goodyear's Music Box
9:30-Community Calendar
9:45-Music for Millions.
10:00-News.
10:05-Lawrence Quintet.
10:15-What Deo You Know.
10 :30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-Women Today.
10:45-Waltz Time.
11:00-News.
11:05-Piano Moods.

11:15-Ralph Ginsburg.
11:30-Farm & Home Hour.
12:00-News.
12:15-Merle Pitt.
12:30-Trading Post.
12:45-Luncheon Melodies.
1:00-News.
1:05-Holywood Reporter.
1:15--Pat, Dupont (Voc.)
1:30-Lionel Hampton.
1:45-J. Sears (C. Dennis).
2:00-News.
2:05-Hal Stuart.
2:15-U. of M.
2:45-Fireside Quartet.
3 :00-News.
3:05-Eiverett Tutchings.
3:15-Charlie Barnett.
3:30-Band Music.
3:45--The Stardusters.
4 :00-News.
4:05-Jules Lando.

4:30--Ranch Boys & Betty
Lou.M
4:45-Misch Borr & Orch.
5:00--News.
5:05- Campus Ballroom.
5:45-Sports Review.
6:00-News.
6:15-David Rose & Orch.
6:30--Telephone Quiz.
6:45--Piano Interlude.
6:55-Flashes from Life.
7:00-News.
7:15-Fireside Harmonies.
7:25-Band of the Week.
7:30-Leo P. Meyers.
7:45-Community Fund
8:00--News.
8:05-Seventh War Loan.
8:10-Piano Interlude.
6:15-Put & Take It.
8:30--Ypsi. Jr. Chamber of
Commerce.

edc a tu)is Keyi
It)o Its Alleviation1
"Hay fever and asthma sufferers
who keep going North in search of
summer relief havens instead of med-
icating themselves are making a big
mistake," Dr. Buenaventura Jimenez,
allergist at the University Health
Service, said yesterday.
A hay fever victim may find almost
complete relief in Petoskey one year,
he explained, but is likely to begin
sneezing and wheezing when he re-
turns there the following year. In
two years, he will probably have be-
come sensitized to the local pollen,
and will find no relief in Petoskey.
Will Suffer Farther North
This hay fever sufferer may go far-
ther north, perhaps to Sault Ste.
Marie, the following summer," Dr.
Jiminez continued, "but after two
seasons there, he will start reacting
to the pollen in that locality. Canada
may be his next refuge. This traveling
may keep tip until the unfortunate
person can go no farther north.
Then, if he has the time and the
money, Dr. Jimenez said, the hay
fever victim may head south to Mex-
ico City where the high altitude
seems to help his allergy-for a few
seasons. But finally, after 10 years
or so of expensive traveling, he will
have exhausted all his North Ameri-
can seasonal refuges.
Now he may decide to stick it out
in his own home town for a season,
but he will suffer more than he ever
did before because he will have lost
all of his immunity to the local pol-
len. Besides this ,he is 10 years older,
and his resistance is getting weaker
each year.
Moving About Won't Give Relief
He can always pack up and go to
Greenland or the Azores where the
chances are he will find 'permanent'
relief for several years," Dr. Jimenez
commented, "but this cannot go on
ocal Recital Today
Accompanied by Ma ilyn Mason,
Jean Frances Scott, soprano, will pre-
sent a student recital at 8:30 p.m.
EWT (7:30 p.m. CWT) today in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The program will include selec-
tions by Donaudy, Cimara, Brahms,
Blech, Szulc. Massnet, Debussy,
Goosens, Dorothy James and Hage-
man. Mis;s Scott, student of Thelma
Lewis, is a member of Mu Phi Epsi-
lon, national music sorority.
Service Fraternity
To Hold Initiation
Alpha Phi Omega, campus service
fraternity, will hold its initiation for
the pledges of the Spring term of
1945 today at 7:30 p. n. EWT (6:30
CWT) in the Union.
Those initiated will be Sidney Zil-
ber. Bruce Morrison, Fred Leslie,
William Fritze, and Phil Elkus. The
pledge project was the presentation of
the V-E Dance.

forever. As long as a person is al-
lergic, there is no place where he will
find lasting relief."
The only solution to his problem,
the allergist asserts, is to have his
case diagnosed and treated accord-
ingly at home. Nearly every one of
the bothersome hay fever pollens can
be defeated by immunization, he ad-
ded.
Health Service Gives Treatments
Approximately 500 students are
now being treated for .allergies at the

University Health Service, Dr. Jim-
enez said, and this number has been
increasing every year.
The sufferer is first given a free
scratch test to determine his aller-
gies. Then, if he wishes, he will
be given intradermal tests at a nom-
inal cost, after which he will receive
the individual treatment his case re-
quires.- A hay fever sufferer may buy
his medicine at the Health Service at
cost price, and will be given the treat-
ments free of charge.

t'A qipiftfe

TEMPERATU RE
RISING...
But you can keep cool in shorts
and playsuits from the CAMPUS
SHOP. Enjoy the summer and
forget the heat by wearing air-
conditioned clothes.

,
' - 'i "
, -
' .
_
r
r
Y1 y
,.
, ,
-;. 1
r ,,r
5 '
a .
/ - "y y"
/' / y

i
f

k E'
V
1 l
The s a Lady Wolf'
The Fat Marn' a _ha
WjrLLmAk
That 'Objective Burma kid'S
tv
"pugtoWfAtSZ
W"YIc'it

Bfurt To Give Annual
I1opw ood Lecture
"The Unreality of Realism" will be
the topic of the annual Hopwood
Lecture to be delivered by Struthers
Burt at 4 p. m. EWT (3 p. m. CWT)
Friday, in Rackham Lecture Hall.
At the conclusion of the lecture
the winners of the major and minor
awards in the 1945 Spring Hopwood
Contest will be announced as well as
the judges in the current contest.
Burt is the author of the current
best-seller, "Philadelphia: Holy Ex-
periment."

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
WANTED
WANTED-Second cook, for private
boys' camp in northern Michigan.
June 22-Aug. 25. Call 7265.
WANTED: 4 waiters for eight week
summer session and boys for work
in kitchen. Please call Mrs. Rowles,
Sorosis, 2-3279.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Black wallet in or near State
theatre. Please return identifica-
tion. Call Ruth, 6922.
LOST-Silver bracelet with brilliants,
Lost on State or Liberty. Please call
M. Whaite, 2-2591. Reward.
LOST: Blue and gold Eversharp pen
between Oakland and Metzger's.
Reward. Call Gene Cordt. 2-1513.
-I FOR RENT
FOR RENT - Large single or double
room with six windows. Very neat.
Shower bath. Breakfasts. Good
home. Southeast section. Ph. 7796.

HOT ON THE TRAIL
To WAHR'S for graduation
presents that aim to please -
wallets, writing kits, leather pic-
ture frames, and the perennial
favorite, books.
FIT FOR A PRINCESS
Nighties and pajamas that will
make the graduate feel like royal-
ty can be found at the SMART-
EST HOSIERY SHOP. And for
hot weather relief, buy a topper
for yourself.

R .
...--'..' - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
tah n t,
-
-x
People DISAGREE about dogs
.but people AGREE
there is no better beer
thanflf PR

IT'S A BARGAIN ...
Whether you're Scotch or not,
you'll realize the practicability of
a new permanent for summer. The
GROOM WELL BEAUTY SALON
at 1205 South University will style
your hair for beauty . . . and in-
expensively, too!

FOR SALE
FOR SALE - Home in Paw Paw,
Mich. (U.S. 12) 316 St. Joseph St.
J. A. Burke. 7 rms., 2 baths, large,
bright living room, hardwood floors.
fireplace, full basement, furnace
heat; screened porch, full 2 stories.
large lot.
MISCELLANEOUS
DRIVING to Denver, Colorado about
June 20. Call Dee at 6061.

'%

AT THE
RADIO RECORD SHOP
713 N. IflIVIRtsiTy

HEADLINERS .. .
For the lovers of hot jazz, The
RADIO & RECORD SHOP en-
ables you to conduct your own
special jam session on records
with the Blue Notes album, which
features Sidney Bechet, Art Hodes,
and Albert Ammons.

AI0

BOND PREMIERE
SUPPORT STATE THEATRE - WED., JUNE 13
BETT GJABLE
"DIAMOND UORSESHOE"
WAR LOAN FREE TICKET WITH
EACH BOND PURCHASED HERE

con t
Dt
f romr

WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE DAY OR NIGHT
IU ou s Wee'
'oily 30B c to
1p1.m.

IT'S EASY...
To shop for a graduation pres-
ent when you visit ELIZABETH
D"LLON'S accessory bar and see
their gay collection of purses; belts,
jewelry, and flowers.

lkcays
5 p.mn.

NOW PLAYING-

- -a

THE EXPERTS SAY. .
To make her graduation present
a gift from EIBLER'S. They sug-
gcst either earrings, a pin, ring, or
bracelet to bring that special light
into her eyes.

I

I

f I

-~ - -- w - - -

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan