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May 27, 1945 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-27

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

House Moves

To Reduce

Reciprocal'Trade
Iegislation Would Slash Duties Far
Below Level of Hawley-Smoot Act 7
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, May 26-Responding to an emphatic appeal by Presi-
dent Truman, House Democrats rode roughshod over Republicans today to
vote the executive broad new authority to cut tariffs in reciprocal trading
with other nations.
The-count on passage was 239 to 153 as Mr. Truman made the tariff
pill the first direct test of his Congressional following on a major piece of
legislation.
The president said flatly, in a letter read by Speaker Rayburn (D.-Tex.)
that further tariff cutting authority is needed "for the success of my ad-

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T White House

By President

Food Situatilon To Be
Discussed at Meeting
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, May 27-President
Truman has invited former President
Herbert Hoover to the White House
to confer on the food situation in
Europe.
The former president, who was
Food Administrator in World War ,I
accepted the invitation to call Mon-I
day. Presidential Secretary Charles
G. Ross said the President "felt that
Mr. Hoover had information which
would be valuable to him."
First Return Visit
Attaches could not recall that the
former President had visited the
White House since he left in March
4, 1933 to be succeeded by Franklin
D, Roosevelt.
In a V-E Day address Mr. Hoover
urged action to save Europe's people
from starvation, saying, "peace, pros-
perity and freedom will not rise from
stunted minds or stunted bodies."
He then said "it is now 11:59 on
the clock of starvation," and urged
that thousands of canteens be estab-
lished.
He recommended that the United
Nations Relief and Rehabilitation
Administration or the War Depart-
ment start shipments of food to Eu-
rope within two weeks.
Contributions to UNRRA
He said relief services should be
financed by international contribu-
tions to UNRRA, which, he said, has
been hampered by "power politics."
Last Tuesday, President Truman
ordered priorities "necessary to meet
the minimum civilian requirements of
those of our Allies who have been
ravaged by the enemy to the fullest
extent that the successful prosecu-
tion of military operations and the
maintenance of our essential domes-
tic economy permit."

ministration," and Democrats and
some Republicans rallied behind him.
Would Prolong Trade Act
The legislation, which now goes to
the Senate, would prolong the life of
the Reciprocal Trade Act for three
years with expanded powers-allow-
ing tariff cuts in some items up to
75 per cent below the levels of the
Republican Hawley-Smoot Act of
1930.
Just beforedthe final vote the Dem-
ocrats beat down 212 to 181 a Re-
publican motion to send the legis-
lation back to the ways and means
committee with instructions that any
reference to any broadened execu-
tive power over tariffs be deleted. This
was the crucial test.
Only thirteen Democrats crossed
over to vote with the Republicans on
this count, while seven Republicans
voted with the Democrats.
Return to 1914 Tariff Levels
The State Department said the bill
..will permit a return to the tariff'
levels of the Underwood Act of the
Woodrow Wilson administration, not
item by item but on an average basis.
Democrats shouted to the house
that the vote was a test whether
America wants to cooperate with
other nations or become isolationist,
and that the action was watched by
United Nations delegates at San
Francisco.
Republicans said such claims were
absurd, and argued that cutting im-
port duties would put American
labor in competition with low-paid
foreign workers, cause some Ameri-
can industries to close and result in
unemployment.
New Tariff-Cutting Powers
Specifically, the legislation gives
the president new powers to cut tar-
iffs up to 50 per cent below rates
prevailing January 1, 1945, in reci-
procal agreements in which other na-
tions agree to reduce their trade bar-
riers.
The president, under present law,
which expires June 12, has authority
to trim duties up to 50 per cent below
the rates of the last Republican tar-
iff law, the Hawley-Smoot Act of
1930. On those items on which the
full 50 per cent has been made the
new legislation would permit an ac-
cumulated reduction of 75 per cent
ERE! DAY OR NIGHT

By The Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO, May 26-Small
nations chalked up a hard-fought
victory over the great powers today
in a United Nations Conference com-
mittee vote to omit from a world
charter provision for expelling un-
ruly members.
At the same time, the American
delegation clamped a gag on the air-
ing of discussions aimed at clearing
from the path of the conference -the
big issue of absolute, great-power
control over a world organization.
DeGaulle May Arrive
Delegates attending routine com-
mittee sessions talked about the pos-
sibility that two chiefs of state might
turn up here for the signing of the
charter early next month. Reports
in Paris suggested that General
Charles De Gaulle might fly to Wash-
ington next week and accompany
President Truman to the closing cere-
monies of the Conference. The French
delegation lacked confirmation, how-
ever.
The Big Five-Russia, China, Brit-
ain, France and the United States-
now are confronted with the prob-
lem of carrying an appeal to a con-
ference commission if they want to
write an expulsion provision into the
charter.
Big Five Loses Appeal
Tt was learned today that they had
failed to drum up the necessary two-
thirds vote to do it in a committee on
membership, despite strong pleas by
American, Russian and British
spokesmen.
They built up 19 votes for a pro-
posal to mention expulsion in the
charter, but 16 negative votes pre-
vented obtaining the required two-
thirds.
Russian delegate Z. K. Zarapkian
declared lack of an expulsion provi-
sion would act like an "ulcer" on the
world organization and urged politi-
cal exile for nations which don't ob-
serve charter obligations.
Expulsion Should Be Rule
William Mabane, a British delegate,
suggested that infractions of charter
obligations might be punished by sus-
pension but that expulsion should be
the rule for any country that fails to
keep peace.
Finally, a suspension clause was
approved 25 to 1, with Russia, and
the United States not voting and
Britain recorded in the negative.
Churchill Plans
Early Meeting
Election Not To Delay
Big Three Conference
LONDON, May 26-(UP)-Prime
Minister Churchill indicated today he
might meet with President Truman
and Premier Marshal Stalin before
the British general election July 5.
In a tour of his constituency just
outside London, Churchill told sev-
eral meetings he might be called
away from his campaign for re-elec-
tion to Parliament to participate in
a post-European war conference of
the Big Three.
"I have informed President Tru-
man, with whom I am in constant
and cordial communication," he said
at Woodford, "that the election must
not be allowed in any way to delay
for even a day a meeting between
the heads of the government."
Joseph Davies, Truman's personal
representative, planned to meet over
the weekend with Churchill for a
conference which may embrace all
Europe's most pressing problems.
The Polish and Syrian disputes, the
Trieste affair, Austria, the occupation
of Germany and the trial of war
criminals probably will be on the
agenda.

Tokyo ScorchedtoGroundby
Pre-Dawn Superforitress Raid
Imp.eial Palace, Business District
Reported Laid Waste by 500 Planes
Ameicea's it errress s raids. It added the emperor, empress
America's nighty Suiperfortresses and dowager empress were safe.
have just about destroyed Tokyo, Just what happened to the imper-
third largest city of the world. i ial palace proper was not ma'de clear.
Broadcasts from the smoking Jap- Japanese Premier Kantaro Suzuki
anese capital Saturday pictured the was quoted three different ways-
ater par"oftemropolisafirst, that the imperial palace was
g r ." o adestroyed; second that it was burn-
in ruins, including palaces within ed; third that it was damaged.
the grounds of the imperial palace An imperial communique mention-
area, three government ministry ed only "considerable damages" in
buildings, the foreign embassy dis- the city and claimed 47 of the Super-
trict and the business centr. fcrts were shot down. U.S. official
31 U.S. Planes Lost reports said 12 were lost Thursday
The U.S. 20th Air Force at Wash- and 19 Saturday, the latter figures
ington disclosed in a communique representing the heaviest loss yet
that 31 of the giant bombers were for a single B-29 mission.
lost in the two pre-dawn fire raids Meanwhile Washington congres-
Thursday and Saturday, Japanese sional and other quarters warned
time. Japan of bigger air raids to come.
American fliers repurning fritom heThe Army said B-29 outpit would be
Saturday attack by some 500 of the smon-
sky giants with about 4,000 tons of Reporting from the Philippines to-
incendiaries agreed with Tokyo that day (Sunday PhilippinesTtime)Gen.
te great city was "literally scorched Douglas MacArthur said the 14th
to the ground." Division ,had flanked the Japanese in
Today's fleet communique from the bloody sector north of Balete
Guam on the Okinawa invasion Pass, gateway to Luzon's rich north-
rejorted no changes of conmequence east Cagayan Valley. On Mindanao
on the grcund but raised from 111 the Yanks shoved the Japanese deep-
to 166 the number of enemy planes er into the hills.
shot down in a concerted attack ---┬░-
Thursday night and Friday morn- Fir' Mihga M I
ing on U.S. shipping and airfields,. ..
The commuaique alsa reported a Released from Arimy
strike by American Thunderbolts
on enemy airfields on Kyushu, Ja- FORT SHERIDAN, Ill., May 26.-
pan's sciuthernmost home island. (A')-Staff Sgt. Maynard H. Smith,

WHERE ALLIES GAIN IN PACIFIC THEATRE-In the Ryukyus (A)
American troops fought into the capital city of Okinawa and Japanese
predicted, a Yank invasion of Amami. In the Philippines (B) Amperi-
cans were mopping upv on Mindanao and advancing north on Luzon.
Tokyo (C) still burned from the heavy Superfortress raid. Chinese
troops took lHwaiyuanghen (D) and fought to expand the hold on the
coastline about Foochow (E), and British troops in Burma (F) cap-
tured Bassein.
Army ReportsPlan Cub ;
(Rankin Ses ou for Soldiers

lash
Debl,

lo o d iIce War
Release Wor~kers

WAR BONDS ISSUEDI
Continuous from 1 P.M.
STARTS TODAY!
teaIl mr, un m t

H

i0 1rY~iBOR Yf1 fr 'FErA'4"

By 'The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, May 26. - The
(Army's 17,000-plane cutback in air-
craft, largest single armament slash
since V-E Day, may reduce the na-
tion's war bill by $3,500,000,000 and
release 450,000 war workers by the
year-end, highly placed officials said
today.
In addition they predicted that it
will put industry "over the hump"
in supplies of aluminum and small
electric motors for new civilian goods.
The motors, of which each heavy
bomber requires more than 200, had
teen the most-feared bottleneck in
resumed production of refrigerators,
washing machines and other con-
sumer products.
Those War Production Board offi-
cials directly connected with recon-
version were highly elated. They
were pleased, too, with the prospec-
tive release of a quantity of steel
which, though relatively small, will
be mostly of the persistently scarce
alloy type.
DIRECTORY
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Capable and reli-
able young man, evenings and Sun-
days. Pay as much as $35.00 per
week. Call 8111. Mr. Avsharian.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Small pair of air cr.ew wings
on Maynard Friday night. Reward.
Call Jordan. Room 553.
LOST: Evening of May 6-Silver pin
set with turquoise. Return to Lost
& Found, U. Hall. Reward.
LOST: A small gold ring with ini-
tials J.A.F. on front. Sentimental
value. Reward. Call 4489.
LOST: Gold Longine ladies watch.
Black band, Thursday. Return to
lost and found, University Hall.
Reward.
ROOMS
FREE ROOM for student in my home
this summer. One who drives pre-
ferred. A. E. Woodward. 1101 Na-
tural Science.
WANTED
WANTED: Immediately, vocalist,
first tenor, for swing quartet. Avail-
able for travel this summer. Con-
tact Ray Buntaine, 1107 Willard.
Phone 6282.
WANTED: Wardrobe trunk, will pay
cash or offer collection of classical
records as part payment. Phone
3759.

Bill Would Provide for
Bi-Weekly Payments
By The Associated Presf
WASHINGTON, May 26.-Chair-
man Rankin (Dem., Miss.) of the
House Veterans Committee sought
White House blessing today for an
all-out drive for a bonus for service-
men.
Rankin, co-author of the G.I. Bill
of Rights and of legislation that
raised the monthly pay of enlisted
men from $21 to $50 a month, wants
Congress to vote a $1,040 bonus to
every serviceman and woman who
has been in uniform at least 90 days
and hasn't been dishonorably dis-
charged.
"The time to give it to them is
now, while many are being demobil-
ized," he said in an interview during
which he disclosed that he has sou-
ght the views of President Truman
on the whole subject.
The bill provides for payments of
$40 every two weeks for 52 weeks, or
a total of , $1,040, The G.I. Bill of
Rights provides similar compensa-
tion for unemployed veterans, but
Rankin's bill would make the money
available regardless of whether a
veteran is employed. Should a vet-
eran be unemployed, the $20 weekly
provided in the G.I. Bill would be
in addition to the $20 readjustment
pay.
Himmler Buried by
British Sergeants
LUENEBERG, Germany, May 26-
MP)-The body of Heinrich Himmler
was returned unceremoniously today
to the soil of Germany which he
stained with the blood of thousands
of victims of his Gestapo.
"Let the worm go to the worms,"
was his only requiem, spoken by a
British soldier who had to dig his
secret grave.
His buriel was as sombre as that of
his victims in such concentration
camps as Dachau and Belsen. In
fact, the British tried to get a pine
coffin such as used at Belsen for the
slain, but they could not find one.
INVEST IN VICTORY

Tokya reported the B-29s destroy-
ed the "front building" in the imper-
ial palace grounds, a number of out-
bying palaces, ard U.S. and several
other embassies, and what was left
of the business center from previous
UNIVERSITY C
PROF, WI//IAM D. R
PRESE]
TH IR TY-SECC
SPRING
FEATURING S
BACH, BERLIOZ
RIMSKY-KORSA
4:15 PM ( E.W.T.)
HILL AUI[
NO ADMISSI

PETE SMITH PIED PIPER
"TRACK AND FIELD QUIZ" WORLD NEWS
Coming. JOHN CARRADINE "BLUEBEARD

I#2-4

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