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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 25, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO

THE MICHI GAN D TI,

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GI's in Germa
While Awaitin;
By KENNETH L. DIXON
. Associated Press Correspondent
OCCUPIED GERMANY - When
the first post-war lull wore off slight-
ly in this section of Germany, the
Army brass hats and the lowliest
G.L.'s for once were in complete ac-
cord.
Said the upper bracket brass:
"Let's inaugurate a comprehensive
athletic and general sports program
for all divisions awaiting reassign-
ment in the European theater."
Said the G.I.'s: "Let's play ball."
Not Always Ball Games
However, it wasn't always just ball
games. Almost every kind of sport
came in for some attention even dur-
ing that first post-war week. Equip-
ment and facilities were not always
available, but GI ingenuity usually
nmanaged a substitute somehow.
One of the first outfits to get the
ball rolling athletically speaking was
the 29th Infantry Division located in
and around Bremen. A large scale
Prof. Slosson
Will Address
Sigma Rho Tau

ay To Play Ball
g Reassignment
sports program already is in full
swing under the direction of Maj.'
Tommy A. Dukehart (222 Longwood
Rd.) Baltimore, Md.
"It's just like a college intramural
schedule," Maj. . Dukehart said.j
'Bas'eball, softball, boxing and track
teams have been formed in each bat-
talion and regiment of the division.
From the best teams we will select
division varsity teams to compete
with other divisions in the theater."
More Than Routine Sports
Dukehart's program goes beyond
the routine type of sports-partially
because of the location of his outfit.
"Swimming, boating and yachting
facilities have been put.at the dispo-
sal of many of our units since we
found excellent water sport facilities
in this territory," the division special
service chief explained. "In addition,
we've started various types of con-
tests in golf, badminton and horse-
shoe pitching. There's practically no
type of sport that a soldier can't*
find some kind of competition in
around here these days."
Champion Golf Instructor
Those GI's interested in golf can{
get special instruction from the for
mer Minnesota champion -- Pfc.
Thomas Hamper of St. Paul.
Now- a member of the 29th's Spe-
cial Services Athletic Section, Ham-!
per was a rifleman in the 175th Regi-
ment during combat days and wears
the Combat Infantryman's Badge as
well as the Purple Heart for wounds
suffered in the Roer River crossing.
Since his transfer, he has been su-
pervisng and coaching various teams
which eventually will compete for
the theater championships.
He was an all-stateatackle for three
years, bit it was as a golfer that he,
is best known.
Iolds Amateur and Pro Records
Playing for Johnson High School
of St. Paul, he won the state cham-
pionship three years and then went
on to win the State College crown
three more years-not to mention
taking the State Amateur Tourney
laurels in 1940. Then he turned pro
and played in the National tourna-
ment in 1941 and 1942.
-A

UJA Plans To Go over Top
With Last Cam'ipaign Proceeds
As the final eveni in the United chants, will be auctioned off by the
Jewish Appeal campaign, an "Over-
the-Top Mixer" will be held from 9 "silver-tongued" auctioneer, tobacco-
to 12 p.m. EWT (8 to 11 p.m. CWT) chewin' Fielding, Walters revealed.
tomorrow at the Hillel Foundation. This same Fielding, known in the
It is hoped that oroceeds from the campus entertainment world as

i

Mixer will boost the student contri-
butions to the campaign over the
;2,500 quota, Beryle Walters, student
director in charge of the campaign
said. Funds collected in the nation.-
wide drive will be used to bring relief
to Jewish refugees throughout the
world.
Prizes for 'Sale'.
Included in the evening's enter-
tainment is the chance to procure a
,leather whiskey flask, a five-foot sa-
lami, a copy of James Thurber's "My
Life and Hard Times", a record 'al-
bum of Brahms -Second Piano Con-
certo and articles of wearing apparel
ranging in nature. from sox to top-
hats.

"Doe", was the master of ceremonies
in both productions of Kampus Kap-
ers and in the Army-Navy Revue.
To Give War Bond
A war bond goes to the one who
picks the lucky ticket at the door,
and $10.00 in war stamps will be
raffled off.
Dancing and eating will complete
the agenda for the evening, Walters
said, emphasizing the fact that a
date is not one of the prerequisites
for admission.
Barbara Levin and Muriel Klein-
waks of the social committee and
Edythe Levin anld Sonya Heller of
Hillel Players are in charge of plan-
ning; the Mixer. UJA funds will be

These commodities, which have managed by Judith Jacobs and Ruth
been donated by Ann Arbor mer- Elconin.

Mich il

NOW PLAYING

YANKS BLAST JAPS FROM OKINAWA HIDEOUT-Veteran Marines of the First Division close in
for point-blank firing on Japs holed up in a cave on Okinawa as their "satchel" charge explodes with
a cloud of smoke. Caption states that man in foreground is protecting himself by hugging the ground
wending results of attack.

THE COMIC SIDE OF HOMICIDE

Speaking before the Annual Na-
tional Convention of Sigma Rho
Tau, engineering speech fraternity,
Prof. Preston W. Slosson will dis-
cuss the general courses of action
open to the United States emerging
from the war as the world's greatest
Power under the headings "America,
Imperialist? Isolationist? Interna-
tionalist?" at 7:30 p. in. EWT (6:30
p. m. CWT) in Rm. 318, the Union.
Attending the Conference will be
representatives from Sigma Rho Tau
chapters in three Detroit universi-
ties. Four annual contests will be
held: Hall of Fame, Raconteur, Ex-
temporaneous, and Project speak-
ing. Representatives will attend a
dinner in the Union at which a Tall
Story contest will be held.
National president and national
secretary of Sigma Rho Tau will be
elected at a business meeting Satur-
day afternoon, and the general theme
to be discussed in the Stump Speak-
ers' Society talks during the coming
year will be selected, Prof. Robert D.
Brackett, advisor of the Alpha (local)
chapter announced.
RECORDS

PAT
O'BRIEN

GEORGE
MURPHY

CAROL
LANDIS

IU' Band Will
Present Ai na

,

"HAVING WONDERFUL CRIME"

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a,

music

aI*

"Swimccipodcs"
Sports Parade

Paramnount
Mews

"G. I. Johnny"

iJe1[.rtgo n c1! toQ
To Give Party
A baseball game with the faculty
and Cy Barnes and his fish pond
frolic will highlight the Architecture
and Design School party which will
be held from 7 to 12 p.m. EWT (6 to
11 p.m. CWT) today at the Women's
Athletic Building.
Door prizes, dancing, a floor show,
and refreshments have been planned.
The baseball game will start at 7
p.m. EWT at the WAB field and pre-
cedes the dancing.
Jackie Carl is general chairman of
the affair, and her committee is Win-
nie Chan, Olga Kazarinoff, Yoshi
Machida, and Betty Ann Sweeney.
All Architecture and Design School
students are invited to attend, and
tickets may be bought at the door.
Navy men in the Architecture and
Design School coming to the party
have 1 a.m. EWT permission.

Concert Sunday
The Finale from Fauchet's "Sym-
phony in B-flat" and Love scene
from Moussorgsky's "Boris Godou-
nov", recently performed on the May
Festival series, will highlight the
University Concert Band's thirty-
second annual spring concert at 4:15
p.m. EWT (3:15 p.m. CWT) Sunday
in Hill Auditorium.
Under the direction of Prof. Wil-
ham D. Pevelli, the approximately
75-member Concert Band will open
the program with Rimsky-Korsa-
kov's Procession of the Nobles from
"Mlada" which received its premiere
in 1393 in St. Petersburg. The band
transcription is by Erik Leidzen.
Other selections on the concert
include the Overture, "Beatrice and
Benedict" by Berlioz, "A Manx Rhap-
sody" by Wood, Bach's "Prelude and
Fugue in G minor". "Repartee" by
Bennett, "Swinging the Ingots" by
Moffitt and a group of Michigan
songs. Warren Benson, percussion,
and Paul Kuiter, pianist, Navy V-12,
will be featured soloists.
CLASSIFIED
D IRECr
HELP WANTED

Siegfried To

Marian Cole Siegfried, contralto
will present a recital in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for the
B. M. degree, featuring selections by'
Tschaikowsky, Carpenter, Torelli, and
Paisello, at 8:30 p. in. EWT (7:30
p. m. CWT) today in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
A graduate of Nazareth Aca-
demy, Nazareth, Mich., Mrs. Sieg-
fried studied at Western Michi-
gan College of Education, Hills-
dale College and the Chicago Con-
servatory of Music, prior to her en-
rollment here. She is a member
of the Choral Union and First
Methodist Church choir in Ann
Arbor, having formerly been con-
tralto soloist at the First Presby-
terian Church, Kayamazoo, and St.
Louis, Mo.~
Mrs. Siegfried will open her pro-
gram with "Quelle fiamma che
m'accende" by Marcello. Other selec-
tions will include Torelli's "To lo
sai," "Frauenliebe und Leben" by
Schumann, "Adieu, forets" from
Tschaikowsky's "Jeanne d'Arc," and
a group of American numbers: "The
Green River," "Serenade" by Car-
penter; "At the Well" by Hageman;
"From A Rooftop" by Rugg and Ban-
tock's "A Feast of Lanterns." She
will be accompanied by Ruby Kuhl-
man. The recital is open to the
public.
Zapf To Give Recital .
Virginia Zapf, soprano, pupil of I
Prof. Hardin Van Deursen of the
School of Music, will be heard in a
recital, featuring selections by De-
bussy, Schubert, Brahms, Schumann
and Wolf at 8:30 p. m. EWT (7:30
p. m. CWT) Sunday in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
A senior in music education, Miss
Zapf attended Valparaiso Univer-
sity in Indiana. A member of Mu
Phi Epsilon, national music soror-
ity, she helped in the Choral Un-
-I

Hold Recital

ion's preparation of the "Blessed
Damozel" for the recent May Fes-
tival by singing the- solo role in
that work.
A ti al Reciti aToB fiel
Featuring ensemble and quintet
numbers, the annual woodwind re-
cital will be presented by nine stu-
dents.in the School of Music under
the direction of Prof. William D.
Revelli at 8:30 p. m. EWT (7:30
p. in. CWT) Monday in the Lydia,
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Flute, clarinet, cornet, tuba, eu-
phonium, trombone players will be
heard in selections by Hindemith,
Bloch, Beethoven, Haydn, Teleman
and Williams. Those participating
in the program are R. Grady Brown,
Doris Parker, Nathan Anderson,
Barbara Litchfield, George Murthum,
Anthony Desiderio, Allen Chase, Don-
ita Crossley and Dwight Daily.
Crawford Will Sing,.

RIDE

"UNUSUAL OCCUPATIONS#,
Sunday Sonja Henie"It'sAPleasure"

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IN YOUR HOU R S

AT THE
RADIO & RECORD SHOP
715 N. UNIVERSITY

FREE TICKETS for .Bond Show June 13th
Betty Grable il" ]DIAMOND HORSESHOE"
With Every Bond Sold in Any Ann Arbor Theatre
Continuous from 1 P.M.
T0DAY and
Saturday

I ( R 0 O

,;
' ,t
. ;
Lt
:.

HELP WANTED: Capable and reli-
able young man, evenings and Sun-
days. Pay as much as $35.00 per
week. Call 8111. Mr. Avsharian.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gold clip Sunday between
Washtenaw, Hill and Union. Re-
ward. Call Marcia Bry. 2-2541.
LOST: Evening of May 6-Silver pin
set with turquoise. Return to Lost
& Found, U. Hall. Reward.
LOST: A small gold ring with ini-
tials J.A.F. on front. Sentimental
value. Reward. Call 4489.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT: Bachelor apartment.
Study, bedroom, dressing room.
bath. No cooking. Available June
15. $40 month. Shown by appoint-
ment only. Phone 4742.
ROMS
FREE ROOM tor student in my home
this summer. One who drives pre-
ferred. A. E. Woodward. 1101 Na-
tural Science.

Highlighting her program with se-
lections by Mozart, Wolf, Brahmr,
Rimsky-Korsakov and Wagner, Lola
Crawford, mezzo-soprano, will give a
recital in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the B.M. degree in
music education at 8:30 p~m. EWT
(7:30 p.m. CWT) tomorrow in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
A senior in the field of music
education, vocal supervision, Miss
Crawford is from Niles, Mich. She
is a member of Mu Phi Epsilon,
honorary music sorority, and Chor-
al Union.

Phone 2-344;

,

FREE FROM THE CARES OF STUDY
GROUP OF HANDSOME NEW. HORSES
Special Rates for Servicemen
COURTESY CAR
Golfsiode Riding Stables

11

3250 East Huron River Drive

Also

Stardust ini

. .
,,

MARCH OF
"SPOTLIGHT ON

TIME
CONGRESS"

CARTOON
NEWS

.
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a

Coining Sunday! "THIS MAN'S NAVY" I

your Bonet-?
We mean "captured staidusL"
or Roger&GalIet dry perfumwe.
Just put some of this pow-
dered perfume between two
thin layers of cotton and ac-
tually tuck it in your"bonnet".
I's the cutest surest way of keeping
your favorite Roger& Gales scent
wih you all the time. Your hair will
ie (fragrant with "captured stardust."

isdoing awarjobto
.. n she needs your,
Three out of every five calls to Infor-
miation are for numbers listed in the
telephone directory.
That means that close to 1,00 hours
of operator and switchboard time are
used up daily in Michigan answering _:-.
needless calls. That precious time still
cannot be spared on the war-busy, tek'- -
phone system.
HERE'S HOW YOU COLLEGE
MEN AND WOMEN CAN HELP

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