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May 13, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-13

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PAGE TWO

THE IICHIGAN DAILY

{1l A-, MAY 13, 19l'

..........

_ ,

Regents Receive Book
Collection of Late Dean

The Board of Regents has received
the library of the late Dr. W. B. Hins-
dale, former dean 'of the Homeo-
pathic MedicaleCollege and later
Custodian of Michigan Archaeology
in the University Museums.
The collection, representative of
the broad interests of Dr. Hinsdale,
includes a number of museum mater-
ials. Distributed to the various Uni-
versity libraries according to their
fields of study, the Michigan Histori-
cal Collections, the Clements Library,
the University Museums and the
School of Education library have
been the principal beneficiaries.
Bequest Includes McGuffey's Readers
The varied career of Dr. Hinsdale
is indicated by the scope of his be-
quest. Prior to his graduation from
medical school he was a schoolmas-
ter in the public schools of northern
Ohio. Thc complete series of Mc-
Guffey's readers, particularly the Mc-
Guffey's Eclectic Primer published in
1867, now at the School of Education
library, recalls the educational meth-
ods of his time.
After graduating from the College
of Homeopathy in Cleveland, he prac-
Mrs. Sanders Will
Lecture on 'Texas'
Accompanying the March of Time
film "Texas," Mrs. Henry A. Sand-
ers will lecture at the International
Centers Sunday evening program at
7:30 p. m. EWT (6:30 p. i. CWT)
today.

ticeJ medicine for ten years prior to
his acceptance of the deanship here.
The Michigan Historical Collections
have received several histories of
Michigan written by Dr. Hinsdale,
personal diaries and scrapbooks illus-
trating the conflict between home-
opathy and traditional medicine at
the time of his deanship. The His-
torical Collection also received a
nunber of books written by faculty
members and autographed by the
authors.
American history source material,'
including rare editions of Thomasj
Paine's "Rights of Man", a Ku Klux
Xlan const tution and several prim-
ers by DeWitt Clinton and Benjamin
Fi anklin, also several histories of the
early American period with emphasis
on the Indian wars, have been re-
ceived by the Clements Library.
Donated Autographed Letters
The donation to the Clements Li-
brary included two autographed let-
ters from James A. Garfield to B. A.
Hinsdale and an autographed letter
to W. B. Hinsdale from Eastman
Johnson, the artist who painted "The
Young Lincoln Reading in the Light
of the Open Fire", owned by the
Univers ity.
Dr. Hinsdale retired in 1922 and
adopted a new field, anthropology,
specialhring in the Great Lakes re-
gion. The Museum of Anthropology
now contains the bulk of his collec-
tion of Indian relics. Numbering ap-
proximately 1,600, the archaeological
specimens include several baskets,
axes, arrowheads and copper imple-
ments.

i

First Nazi Sub'
In U.S. Waters
T o Surrender
Expected To Arrive
At New Jersey Port
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK, May 12-The Ger-
man submarine U-858, first enemy
vessel to surrender in American home
waters since the outreak of the
present war, is expected to arrive off
Cape May, N.J., tomorrow.
Vice-Admiral H. F. Leary, com-
mander of the eastern sea frontier,
said the submarine made contact
with United States fleet units several
days ago and is being escorted on a
prescribed course to Cape May.
In accordance with the rule pro-
mulgated by the Navy and the British
Admiralty, the submarine, flying the
black surrender flag, will come in on
the surface with a large proportion
of her crew on deck. Fourth Naval
District officials will receive the sur-
render for Leary.
After the crew members have been
removed as prisoners of war, the sub-
marine will be taken to Philadelphia,
the Navy said.
Grads Sponsor
Forum on Post
War Ediiucation
The position of education in the<
post-war world will be the topic of a
forum sponsored by the Graduate
Student Council at 7:30 p.m. EWT
(6:30 p.m. CWT) tomorrow in the I
Men's Lounge of the Rackham Build-~
ing.
The question of vocational vs. clas-
sical education will be treated from
three viewpoints, according to Bill
Akel:s, president of the Council.
Dr. Clarence D. Thorpe of the Eng-
lish Department will discuss the place
of the literary college; Dr. Howard Y.]
Mcclusky of the School of Education
will argue for a liberal, well-rounded
education; and Dr. G. G. Brown of
the chemical engineering department
will speak on vocational training.
Prof. John L. Brumm will act as
moderator.
General discussion by the audience
will follow the ten-minute speech
presented by each of these faculty
members. A coffee hour will be held
after the forum.
CLASSIF IE D
DIR ECT ORY
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Kappa Kappa Gamma key.
Inscribed "Margaret J. Allen" on
back. Reward. Call 2-4143.
LOST: Tri-Delta seal ring-gold on
black. Name engraved inside. Re-
ward. Call 2-3494.
LOST: One Alpha Delta Phi frater-
nity pin with name E. J. Potter on
back. If found, please call Mary
Bronson, 4089. Reward.-
LOST: Grey gabardine topcoat. On
the Island. If found, phone Jim,
4493. Reward.
FOR RENT
ROOM: at the Alpha Xi Delta house.
Open 16 weeks summer term. Con-
venient and cheap. Inquire 715 Hill
or 2-5570.

INNER 10
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Prof. John Brumm, chairman of
the Department of Journalism, and
Prof. Arthur Wood of the Department
of Sociology, are leaving for Detroit
Guest Soprano
Will P"'resent
Lieder Recital
Highlighting her program with
selections by Brahms, Hugo Wolf,
Richard Strauss and Schubert, Dor-
othy Ornest Feldman, guest soprano,
will present a lieder recital at 8:30
p.m. EWT (7:30 p.m. CWT) today in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Mrs. Feldman studied under Lucy
Lee Call during her undergraduate
days at the Eastman School of Mu-
sic and received her Master of Music
degree from the University in 1944.
She was a pupil of Prof. Arthur
Hackett in the School of Music.
Continuing her vocal studies with
Therese Schnabsl in New York last
summer and fall, Mrs. Feldman has
given concerts in Rochesteur, Flint,
Grand Rapids, Jackson, Saginaw and
Ann Arbor. She will be accompan-
ied by Miss Kathleen Rinck of the
School of Music piano faculty.
A student recital will be presented
by Jean Gilman, soprano, at 8:30
p.m. EWT (7:30 p.m. CWT) Tuesday
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Both programs are open to the pub-
lie.

tomorrow to attend a conference of
the Michigan Citizens Committee.
The purpose of this meeting is to
discuss the key man in the 4tate and
the organization of chapters in their
communities.
Organized Last Fall
Organized in the Fall of 1944 as a
non-partisan political action group to
help in the re-election of the late
President Roosevelt, the M. C. C. has
decided to become a permanent or-
ganization to 'forward goals of a
liberal, enlightened electorate toward
social progress and a world security
organization.'
Membership is drawn from inde-
pendent citizens outside of party and
labor affiliations.
State, Local Organization
At tomorrow's meeting they will lay
plans looking toward state and local
organization.
The speakers of the evening in-
clude: James Loeb Jr., ex-secretary
of the Union for Democratic action
who will speak on "Nation-Wide Or-
ganization of Liberal Forces"; Pat-
rick S. Nertney, chairman of the De-
troit chapter, who will speak on "The
Job Ahead"; and the main speaker,
Frank Hoak, member of Congress,
who will discuss "Crucial Issues of
the Day."
VICTORY HAIR CUTS!!
One blended- shaded- cut to
conform to your specifications!
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State & Mich. Theatres

WHERE CHINESE REPORT VICTORY - Arrows locate drives which
the Chinese say have smashed a Japanese push toward the U. S. air base
at Chihkiang and surrounded enemy troops west of Paoehing. Shaded
areas are Japanese-controlled.
-W -
Hi ' rkshoP' T BU e
Counll"I6 Nominees Are Listed

The seventh meeting of the "Work-
shop on Anti-Semitism" will be held
at 7:30 p. m. EWT (6:30 p. m. CWT)
tomorrow at the Hillel Foundation.
Walter Quillico and Frank Seymour,
guest speakers, will lecture on the
topic "Labor and the Negro View the
Menace of Anti-Semitism."
Quillico was formerly president of
Local 50 UAW (CIO), and is now
UAW (CIO) international represent-
ative. Seymour, a Negro leader, is
an alderman in Ypsilanti and chair-
man of the Education Committee of
Local 50 UAW (CIO).
The meeting is open to tlhe public.
Mother's Day Tea
Sponsored by Hillel
A Mother's Day tea will be held
from 3 to 5:30 p.m. EWT (2-4:30 p.m.
CWT) today at the Hillel Founda-
tion.
Students are invited to come and
bring their parents to an afternoon
of entertainment which will include
Hard games, ping pong and checkers.
Refreshments will be served, and the
record collection is to be open for the
use of the guests.
BUY MORE BONDS
AR ECORDS

Election by Hillel members of the
Hillel student council for the 1945-46
college year will be held from 9:301
a.m.-5:30 p.m. EWT (8:30 a.m.-4:301
p.m. CWT) Tuesday at the Hillel
Foundation, Haven and Hill.
From a nomination slate of 35 per-
sons, 17 will be elected by the pro-
portional representation voting sys-
tem.
Those who are running for Council
are Renee Lichtenstein, Benson Jaf-
fee, Muriel Aaron, Dorothy Raskind,
Frances Pearl, Marshall Wallace,
Helen Greenberg, Ruth Elconin, Burt
Agata, June White, Seymour Lichter,
Judith Chayes, Barbara Levin, Betty
Korash and Sheldon Selesnick.
Others who have been nominated
are Bennett Shulman, Joyce Siegan,
Arthur Kraft, Helen Alpert, Rita
Hyman, Milton Budyk, Anita Franz,
Josh Grauer, Helen Horwitz, Elaine
Greenbaum, Channing Lipson, Harry
Stern, Jerry Greenberg, Reva Send-
ler, Dorothy Hayes, Annette Shenk-
er, Harvey Osland, Blanche Berger,
Al Goren and Allene Golinkin.
Mother's Day Cables
Mother's Day Greetings from 5,000
soldiers in military hospitals in the
Philippines will reach the United
States tomorrow by cable

STATE POLITICS:
Dr. Wood, Brumm Will Attend
Citizens Committee Meeting

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WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE
CONTINUOUS FROM 1 P.M.
STARTS TODAY!

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THE Strangest HolidayTWO PEOPLE EVER SHARED I

AT THE
RADIO & RECORD SHOP
715 N. UNIVERSITY

They shut out the world
around them--but not their
pasts ,.together crowd-
ing a lifetime of .ove,
laughter and tears
into eight days of
'borrowed paradise

1

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6
Cuts downs
oil finish se
Saves preci
Helps prevei
Good for cut
000 pls taxesz

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NOW SHOWING

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smearing. This miracle
ts enamel like lightning.
ous minutes.
mt smudging.

I

SELZNICK INTERNATIONAL presents
GINGER ROGERS
challenging her unforgettable "Kitty Foyle"
JOS~hEPH i0COTTEN
from his triumph in "Since You Went Away"
SHIRLEY TEMPLE
iu her first really grown-up glamour role
jLE $EEING

Yo

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1 Directed by WILLIAM DIETERLE " Produced by DORE SCHARY
Screen play by Marion Parsonnet - From a story by Charles Martin
RELEASED THRU UNITED ARTISTS

iii

IN

111111

.III I I , F .:I > I 1

II

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