100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 11, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

* - ~-HE- MICHIGAN -DAILY

FAMILY SUPPORT:
DAY Sponsors Bill Providing
Allowance for Diabled Vets

I - I

The Disabled American Veterans
announced today that it had sent a
telegram to Congressman Earl C.
Michener urging support of H. R.
1872, a bill to provideOdependency
allowances for all service-abled vet-
erans with families to support.
Carl R. Ernst, Commander of the
DAV Chapter, said the bill was part
of a comprehensive legislative pro-
gram being sponsored by the DAV na-
tional organization.
Family Size Disregarded
"At the present time," he said,
"compensation for permanent service-
incurred disability is based entirely
upon the disability itself, without re-
gard to the number of people who
may be dependent upon the handi-
capped veteran for support.
"H. R. 1872 would make the pres-
ent disability pension the base rate
for a veteran without dependents and
add to that additional allowances
based on the size of the family de-
pendent on him, for support."
Under the terms of the bill, the

DAV Commander said, a totally dis-
abled Veteran would receive depen-
dency. ,lowances at the rate of $25
per month for his wife, $15 for one
child, $12 for the second child, $10
for each additional child ,and $10 a
month for each dependent parent.
Veterans rated less than 100 percent
disabled would receive proportionate
allowances.,
Receives Less
"If.a man with a wife and four
children is inducted into service,"
Aommander. Ernst said, "his de-'
pendents receive an allotment of $140
a month for their support. But if he
comes back totally disabled and un-
fit for employment, he will receive
only $115 a month on which to sup-
port himself and his family.
"If it is the desire of Congress and
the American people that our service-
disabled veterans should be provided
with a livable compensation-and not
mere subsistence-then I hope they
will support the DAV sponsored bill
to make allowance for dependents,"
Ernst concluded.

10 .. 3 -
sTATUTIMudS Can
p. Togtiihi ,
lost/K
Sean is tuba
MACI'IINATO - = _
AFFLVMachnato inwn .Nakagusuk u
Amke "J -┬░akeYONBAR
rYONABIARU
" Chtw. amaAnza
- - ~Giusi
Sawa\Toyama
ITMN , .TOMUi ?-
zYuza
NaguukirPhilippine
;_ --0Seaun

'KNOWLTON'S NINETY':
Luek, Talk, General Bedlam
Cause Capture of Germans

SOKINAWA

I -

...

Put on the feed bag
at the
Corner Hill and State
OPEN TILL TWELVE

(AP Wirephoto Map)
WHERE YANKS GAIN ON OKINAWA---American drives (arrows)
on Okinawa advanced to the outskirts of Dakeshi village, gained in the
center of the line and near Gaja village iu the east.
CHRISTMAS IN JUNE:
y alle rogram Planned for
Presettion Here Jn, 2

By KENNETH L. DIXON
Associated Press Correspondent
IN GERMANY-There is no ques-
tion that in the waning phases, this
war became a conflict gone crazy.
And out of it all there is no more in-
credible story than how B troops of
the 87th reconnaissance squadron,
went out to meet the Russians.
B troop, a unit of the Seventh Arm-
cred Division commanded by Lt. Wil-
iam Knowlton of Weston, Mass.,
was composed of 90 men and 25 vehi-
cles. It finally made contact-50
kilometers behind the German lines.
German Troops Disarmed.
It went through pocket after pocket
of fiercely resisting Germans. It
spent 24 hours operating alongside
and with enemy installations. During
that period "Knowlton's Ninety" dis-
armed thousands upon thousands of
German troops, organized enemy sol-
diers-including SS men-to work for
them, and accepted the surrender of
a town jammed with enemy troops
located 40 kilometers beyond Ameri-
can outposts.
Although no one definite factor-
other than "luck, fast talk and gen-
eral confusion"-was- wholly respon-
sible; one point probably had more
to do with the success of the fantastic
mission than any other:
Somehow, some way, the Germans
got the idea that wherever the Amer-
icans joined the Russians, there the
line of demarcation for postwar oc-
cupation would be established. For-
tunately they didn't learn until too
late that it wasn't true.
Enemy Flees From Russians
Jumping off from Ludwiglust,
"Knowlton's Ninety" found the road
jammed with German vehicles and
troops retreating from the Russians.
Beyond Neustadt the roads were so
clogged that officers walked ahead
of the American vehicles to clear a
lane for passage. It was the same
east to Parchim.
Thousands of enemy tropos sur-
rendered hundreds of vehicles, guns,
tanks, heavy artillery pieces and sup-
No Let-own in
Draft Expdetd

ply trains. Knowlton told the Ger-
mans to form under their own offic-
ers, discard their weapons by bat-
talions and regiments and proceed to
Ludwiglust. They did.
Three German Divisions
The streets of Parchim were lined
six deep with cheering civilians,
soldiers and recovered Allied military
personnel--bound for our lines. But'
the next town, Lubz, where Knowl-
ton expected to contact the Russians,
was jammed with German troops,
still well equipped and still fighting.
At sundown Knowlton found his 90
surrounded by three German Divi-
sions-and the Russians still 50 kilo-
meters away..-
When German officers demanded'
that the Americans explain their
presence, Knowlton said "We are
going forward to meet the Russians,"
and at first the enemy let them alone.
More thousands surrendered de-
spite the hesitance of their puzzled
officers. Knowlton took First Sgt.,
Hoyle Ladd of Deport, Texas, and'
started walking through town. They
met a German major and the Bur-
gomeister of Lubz who promptly sur-
rendered the town to them.I

Allied Fliers
Demolish Jap
Shippng Lanes
By The Associated Press
MANILA, Friday, May 11.
American and Allied fliers blockading
all of Japan's shipping lanes to the
south have sunk or severely damaged
1,892,082 tons of ships in the first.
four months of this year, Gen. Doug-
las MacArthur announced today.
He said the enemy3c "organized
commei ce in these lanes has prac-
ticaliy disappeared and only scat-
tered and sporadic traffic is now
attempted.
American doughboys, meantime,
were reported making steady gains
against stubborn resistance in the
Davao sector of Mindanao Island in
the Philippines.
On Tarakan Island, off Borneo,
Australian troops penetrated the
auuthern edge of the big Djoeata oil
field.
Lane Hall To Honor
Dean J. B. Edmonson
Dean James B. Edmonson of the
School of Education and Mrs. Ed-
monson will be guests of honor at
the weekly Student Religious Asso-+
ciation Coffee Hour from 4 to 6 p.m.
EWT (3 to 5 p. m. CWT) today at
Lane Hall.

I

d

i+
i

T O F
TWO -F EAT U RES

-

" +... ~ A Metro-Gotdwyn.Moyer
1
Plus...
LIONEL ATWELL in
"FOG ,SLAND"
Sunday - "K E EP YOU R POWDER DRY"s

The "Evening of Ballet" will be
presented by the Sylvia Studio 01
Dance and the Ann Arbor Civic
Orchestra, with the three perform-
ances scheduled for June 1 and 2,
Friday evening, and Saturday after-
noon and evening at the city high
school.
More than 250 participants will
appear this year in ballet, acrobatic,
tap and other dances and ranging
in age from three-year-old toddlers
to professional adult dancers. Music
of Strauss, Chopin, Tschaikowsky will
be among the pieces played by the
orchestra in accompanying the stage
acts.
The opening featur'e will be a
Christmas Fantasy 'with first a Ma-
donna, played by Mary Jean Weber,
then fairies and animated Christmas
trees appearing to do point dancing.
Other performers, dressed as balls
poinsettas, candles, tinsel, ginger
cookies, holly, candy canes and
wreaths, will follow to carry out the
theme of the holiday ornaments. The
"babies" of the Dance Studio, three
to five years old, will portray icicles,
bells, hard candy and stars.

e
f
C
,
x
I
;,
r
S
.
1
9
i'
S

Marjorie Backus, who has been in
New York with the Ziegfield Follies
for the past year,,returned to study
with Mrs.. Sylvia Hamer and will
appear in a solo act as the Candy
Fairy. Her dance is the authoritative
one that is from the Nutcracker
Suite by Tschaikowsky.
Tickets will be sold this week at
the studio, th6 Ann Arbor Senior
High School and by members of the.
Slauson Parent-Teachers Association
who are sponsoring the ballet
CLASSIFIED
DIBECT7OHY
LOST AND FOUND

AMERICAN COMPOSERS
N RECORDS.
COPLAND: EL SALON MEXICO
MUSIC FOR THE THEATRE
FOOTE: SUITE FOR STRINGS
GERSHWIN: CONCERTO IN F
RHAPSODY IN BLUE
AMERICAN IN PARIS
GROFE: GRAND CANYON SUITE
MISSISSIPPI SUITE
HANSON: SYMPHONY NO. 1 (NORDIC)
LAMENT FOR BEOWULF
HARRIS: SMYPHONY NO. 3
KERN: SHOW BOAT SCENARIO
AMERICAN WORKS FOR ORCHESTRA
AMERICAN WORKS- FOR SOLO WIND
INSTRUMENTS
Musical comedy favorites, operettas, current
Broadway hits, fol m.usic . .. You will always
find an extensive collection of Aiveri-
can music at the
Operated by Musicians for Music-Lovers
205 East Liberty Phone 3675

About
To Be

A

ti' -"'

- -

LOST: Green wallet with initials1
R. M. inside. Reward. Call Ray
McGarry. 6061.1
LOST: Kappa Kappa Gamma key.
Inscribed "Margaret J. Allen" on
back. Reward. Call 2-4143.
LOST: Monday in Angell Hall, ladies'
rose gold Binrus wrist watch. Re-
ward. Call Beth King, 2-5618.
WOMAN'S BULOVA WATCH lost
between Stockwell and Presbyterian
church. Call 5009 Stockwell. Re-
ward.
LOST: Tri-Delta seal ring-gold on
black. Name engraved inside. Re-
ward. Call 2-3494.
LOST: One Alpha Delta Phi frater-
nity pin with name E. J. Potter n
back. If found, please call May
Bronson, 4089. Reward.
LOST: Bulova watch with initials R.
E. H. Please call Ruth Hooker,
Newberry, 22591.
FOUND: Pair of glasses behind Stu-
dent Publications Building. Inquire
at desk.
LOST: Black and gold Parker 51 pen-
cil. Initials J. J. H. Reward. Call
Jerry, 9390.
WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE
DAY OR NIGHT
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Today and Saturday

LANSING. May 10.- (AP)- The?
State Selective Service headquarters
said today it had no indication from
federal draft officials or Army sour-
ces that there would be any substan-
tial let-down in draft calls until the
defeat of Japan.
The headquarters estimated be-
tween 2,000 and 3,000 Michigan men
over 18 years of age-half under 30
and half over 30-will continue to be
drafted monthly until the end of the
war.
Brig.-Gen. Le Roy Pearson, state
director, said that if draft calls re-
main at. their present high level th-
drafting of youths reaching 18 years
of age will not be enough to meet
quotas and that the older men must
be diavn.

3,000 State Men
Taken Monthly

r'

i-sm-

... !I

I
I

'Also
LAST DAYS OF WAR
IN EUROPE
NOVA SCOTIA
NATIONAL GALLERY
LAST INSTALLMENT

-m1- -- - - - - - IlI=1NEail

,1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan