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May 03, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-03

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THURSDAY, MAX 3, 1945

THE iClHIGAN DAILY

PAGE °3 FMFF

~F~TURSDAY, MAY 3, 1945 PAGE T~IFE

Michigan ine Face
Tracksters To Compnete ini
Wolverines Take On Purdue, Wolverine Golf

innesota

In

Crucial

Tilts

F2

Tri~an ular Meet ,
ai uh flue /((4
liy HANK MANTHO
Daily Sports Editor

Ray Louthen, Bowman
To Pitch in Vital Series
Four Last Year Squad Members Comprise
Bulk of This Season's Minnesota Team

Miami at Lafayette, Saturday1
Parsons, Thomason, Birdsall To Compete in
Mile, Two-Mile; Fisher Leads Hurdle Events
Michigan thinclads, fresh from a sterling performance at the Penn
Relays, will compete in thirteen different events in their first meet com-
petition of the outdoo'r season when they journey to Lafayette, Indiana
Saturday to meet Purdue and Miami in a triangular meet.
Track Coach Ken Doherty announced that the Hume twins would
be unable to compete because of special medical school work and in their(
stead he would enter Archie Parsons< * * *
and Bob Thomason in the mile, and
Charles Birdsall in the two mile.
Wolvetines Enter Dashes
Other events that the Wolverines
are entered in are the 100, 220, 440
yard dashes, the half-mile run and
the 120 high and 220 low hurdles.
Michigan will also compete in the
following field events: shot put, dis-
cus, high jump, broad jump, pole
vault. Here the Wolverines are not
as strong as in the running events,
and this meet will answer many
questions as to the actual strength
of his field men for Coach Doherty.
Fisher Favorite in Hurdles
In the hurdle' events, Wolverine V
timber toppers will run against Har-...
old "Whitey" Fisher, who turned in
a :15.1 time for the 120 high hurdles
at the recent Drake Relays.
Following this weekend's meet with
Purdue and Miami the tracksters will
return to Ann Arbor to prepare for
the star-studded quadrangular meet
the following week. Here the Wol-
verines will run against Great Lakes, .
Illinois, and Ohio State, which schools
are purported to be the cream of the HAROLD "WHITEY" FISHER
midwestern track crop. . . . Miami University Hurdler

Team Engages
Detroit Friday
Once Beaten Linksters
To Seek Initial Victory
On University Grounds
Michigan's veteran - studded golf
team will play its first home match
of the season at 1:30 p.m. tomorrowj
at the University golf course against
the University of Detroit, and Satur-
day the linksmen will encounter
Western Michigan at Kalamazoo.-
Same Squad To Play
Coach Bill Barclay announced ye'~
terday that a four-man squad con-
sisting of Cant. Paul O'Hara, John
Jenswold, Phil Marcellus, and John
Tews, the same team that won the
Big Ten championship in 1944, will
face the Detroiters in the second1
meeting of these two clubs. Earlier
in the season, the Wolverines en-
Ioward Liebee announced that
the Physical Education Depart-
ment would like to sponsor a men's
badminton tournament if enough
interest is shown. There are pos-
sibilities for both doubles and
singles tournaments. All those de-
siring to participate in such a
tournament should contact Wat-
erman Gymnasium.
countered Coach Bill Joyce's charges
at Detroit, and trounced them by a
score of 15'%-2 r12 and the Maize and
Blue linksmen will be hoping to make
it two straight over the Titans.
After sing to Michigan, the De-
troiters von matches from Purdue
and Zidana and drop xd to Notre
Dame ,iving them a rerord of two
wins 'aganst two losses 3 ar this
season. 'Iee..ng off, again:, the Wol-
verines, the Titans will have Harold
Cook in the number one positien fol-
lowed by Salvatore Poman o. Jerry
Fitzgerald, and Adam Nowie . j
Have Split Even
U) to dae the Maize an I Blue
links souad has only faced tv o op-
ponents, winning from Detroit two
weeks ago, and losing last Saturday's
hard-fought contest to Ohio State
15-12.
Major Leaoue
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

i

By MARY LU HEATH
Boasting a record of eight wins
against one loss this season, Michi-
gan's baseball squad prepares to face
a veteran Minnesota nine in its sec-
ond start against Conference com-
petition tomorrow at 3 p. m. CWT
(4 p. m. EWT) on Ferry Field in the
first of a two-game series with the,
Gophers.
Louthen To Start
Coach Ray Fisher plans to pitch
Ray (Red) Louthen against Minne-

3."

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LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Gold., top Shaeffer fountain
pen, near chemistry building. Sen-
timental value. Reward. Call 3004
Stockwell.
LOST: Eversharp pen, navy blue with
gold top between Stockwell and
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LOST: String of pearls near League
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LOST: Silver friendship bracelet with
5 names on it, Monday night be-
tween Michigan Theatre and State
WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Starts Today-

and Packard. Sentimental value.
Call 2-6429.
WANTED
WANTED: Girl to share 3-room
apartment. Campus location, reas-
onable. Call Winnie Bowles, 2-1
5685. Extension 18.
WANTED: Festival ticket for Satur-
days concerts and Sunday after-
noon. Phone 7981.
WAITERS AND WAITRESSESI
WANTED! University Grill, 615
East William. Excellent arrange-,
ment for meals.
WANTED: Two tickets for all or any
of the May Festival concerts. Call,
21388.
WANTED: 3 tickets for Saturday,
afternoon May Festival concert and
2 tickets for Friday night. Call
6578.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Waiter to work 10
hours a week for 12 meals per
week. Phone 4489. 604 E. Madi-,
son.
HELP WANTED: Capable and reli-
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FOR SALE: Reconditioned alarm
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This Show Runs
Continuous Daily

I HE NEW YORK Yankees. world's richest ball club, which was sold a
short time ago to a trio of wealthy men, namely, Larry MacPhail,
I Capt. Dan Topping and Del Webb, are now in second place behind the
Chicago White Sox as a result of their week-end victories.
Although they are now perched in second place, the Yankees made
an inauspicious start which was somewhat surprising, but their showing
to date is meaningless so early in the season.
Many newspaper men claimed that the Yankee's fortunes didn't begin
to rise until 1920 when Babe Ruth and Ed Barrow joined with them, stating
that the Yanks could attribute their greatness to the aforementioned men,
as well as the sports boom which occurred around that time.
These same scribes implied that the advent of MacPhail, long-noted as
a baseball showman, into the Yankee picture would see startling changes
in the then-conservative outlook of the Yank executives, and that his radical
ideas would once more elevate the New York ball club to the pinnacle of
success it held before the war. However, many of the anticipated changes
have not yet occurred, nor has the verbose gent issued many statements
which would tend to indicate that he proposed many changes, and this
where the main source of surprise emanates.
l AC PHAIL was formerly head of National League clubs at Brooklyn and
Cincinnati before he joined the syndicate which purchased the Yankees
at a reputed $2,800,000. This sale included all of the club's property, of
which Yankee Stadium in New York and the baseball parks at Kansas
City and Newark were a part.
It was at Brooklyn that MacPhail managed to capture the public's
eye, and the things he did were limited only by his imagination. He put
in a pipe organ, staged fashion shows on the diamond, put on rodeos, and
was the first person to introduce night baseball in the major leagues.
MacPhail's impressions of the first few games at Yankee Stadium
have left him with a lonesome feeling since he considers it too large
"to really enjoy a ball game in." MacPhail has been contemplating a
loud speaker system for music in the park to add color to the place
and offset some of the obvious faults.
The only comment that MacPhail could make on this topic of changes
is that "I'll do something about it," and knowing the type of work that he
is capable of when he makes such a statement, many people realize that
this is more of a threat than a promise..
LEAUE NUMBER 3?
r w
Formr Mjor League Stars
Aetie1 i South Paeifie Area
By HANK KEISER
Reports floating back from the better than to expose himself to the
South Pacific area leave the impres- over-enthusiastic rooting of the in-
sion that there exists a "South Sea habitants from across the East River.
Island" division of baseball's Big Casey, who once lost a heart-break-
Leagues. ing World Series game to the New
Names of many pre-war stars ap- York Yankees when catcher Mickey
pear on the rosters of the service Owen dropped the third strike of the
teams in that neck of the woods, and last out, is held in high esteem by the
former teammates frequently find sailors who see him play. They con-
themselves facing each other in the tend that he could probably, "step
hotly-contested diamond battles, nine innings of Major League base-
ball any time." Hugh, who had just
Casey Heads L sthe list of big shut out a Marine Raider batallion
Hughs.Caseywhoweathedlistofabigteam 2-0, before being questioned,
names. Casey, who sweated out many agreed with the Bluejackets' on this
a nine-inning stint in Ebbets Field score.
under the eyes of those solid citizenss
from Brooklyn, was recognized as Plays With Ex-Cronies
one of baseball's best hurlers previous Casey has played against ex-cronies
to his induction. Cletus (Boots) Poffenberger and Bil-
The 32-year-old veteian has been ly Herman, both former members of
nthe 2-yavy tree heai's a n ithe Brooklyn aggregation. Poffen-
in the T . S . Navy three years and is b r e , w o t il d f r t e " u s
ranked as a Chief Specialist. He is Berger, who twirled for the Bums,
serving at a Navy Base Hospital where is a Marine private first class and was
he more than amply fills the pitcher's recently assigned to a Raider nine
berth and assists in managing the after service on Guam.
ball team.
Wants To Return
When questioned by a Marine Corp
Combat Correspondent the ex-Dodger is an asset to your well-being
expressed a strong desire to return and appearance!!
to professional ball after the war, if THE DASCOLA BARBERS
he isn't too old. He believes he is in Between State & Mich. Theatres
top condition and would like nothing

a so-so start over the weekend as they
split a two-game series with Iowa.
The Gopher nine took the first game,
4-1, but were defeated in the return
engagement by a 6-4 count.
Strong Squad
Eight lettermen, four squad mem-
bers from 1944, three freshman stand-
outs, and a flock of Navy transfers
make up the bulk of Minnesota's
team. The pitching staff is particu-
larly outstanding with three hurlers
given star billing. Two of these,
Gene Kelly and Matthew Nolan, were
1944 lettermen. Although an injured
arm kept him off the mound most of
last season, Kelly is purported to be
one of the fastest pitchers in college
baseball. A recent leg injury may
bench him in the weekend series.
Nolan's record of three wins and one
loss last season puts him among the
starters.
Verby, who established a brilliant
pitching record in three years at
Carleton College, came to Minnesota
as a freshman medic in the V-12 pro-
gram. He has speed and control on
the mound, and hit well over .300
throughout his career at Carleton,
He is also a good first baseman.
Catching Shows Power
Bob Graiziger and Hudson Mealey
provide Gopher strength in the
catching department, while Wayne
Williams and Arnold Lehrman will
probably fill the second ,base and
shortstop positions, respectively. Dick
Rediske is expected to go at third,
while Earl Bruhn, a letterman in
1943, will play in the outfield. Ed
Schaller and Wes Johnson may help
patrol the outer gardens.
Meanwhile, Coach Fisher is also
contemplating a single game with
a Romulus Air Base nine Sunday at
Romulus. He expects to start Jack
Peddy, who pitched the opening three
innings in yesterday's 5-3 victory
over the University of Detroit, on the
mound. Tom Rosema will be unable
to make the trip Sunday, and Joe
Soboleski will take over at first base.

BILL GREGOR
sota's Jack Verby in one of the con-
tests, while lefty Bo Bowman will
start the other game for the Wol-
verines. Louthen has a perfect rec-
ord for the season with three wins'
against no losses, while Bowman has
won two after dropping his first start
to Western Michigan.
Called the strongest "paper" team
in the Conference before the season
got under way, Minnesota got off to

9

- I -Mpl

TEAMS W L
New York...........9 4
Chicago.............7 4
Boston.............
St. Louis............6 5
Brooklyn ........... ..5 6
Cincinnati ...........5 6
Pittsburgh ...........5 8
Philadelphia .........3 9

Pet.
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.455
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.385
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WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 3, Brooklyn 1.
New York 9, Philadelphia 8.
St. Louis 4-1, Pittsburgh 2-11.
Cincinnati at Chicago, rain.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Chicago ..............6 3 .667
New York ............8 4 .667
Detroit..............7 4 .636
Philadelphia 6 6 .500
Washington..........6 7 .462
x-St. Louis ............4 5 .444
Boston ...............5 8 .385
x-Cleveland ..........2 7 .222
x indicates playing night game.
WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 2, Chicago 1.
Boston 4, Washington 0.
New York 6, Philadelphia 4.
Cleveland at St. Louis, night.

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