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April 22, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN ,DAILY

SUNDAY, APRiL 22,31945

U

Allies Drive en Miles Past Fallenog_
Beginning of Final Italian Victory }
Seen in City's Fall b Gen.Clark
x%
k }
Yanks Strike To Cut Off German Retreat;
Italian Civilians Say Enemy Without Supplies 3 r 3 t}

Mexicans Anxious To
Attend English Institute

By The Associated Press
ROME, April 21-The U. S. Fifth
and British Eighth. Armies quickly
toppled the great fortress city of
Bologna today and swept on 10 miles
northwest in pursuit of German
troops fleeing for their lives across
the Po Plain.
Nazis..
(Continued from Page 1)
was three-quarters encircled by a
huge 70-mile are of steel thrown,
around the city in a gigantic pincer
operation.
This was effected when the Rus-
sians reportedly lunged south of the
capital in a spectacular 65-mile over-
night sweep that drove to Beelitz, 13
miles southwest of the city's famed
Potsdam gate.
The Germans said that motorized
infantry, supported by hundreds of
tanks, had pushed north from Luck-l
au another 31 miles and reached
Berlin's southeastern suburbs of
Koenigsberg-Wusterhausen, site of
Berlin's silent long-wave Deutsch-
landsender radio station.
Another spearhead of Soviet assault
forces, advancing after being caught
by a flood of water released from a
dynamited hydro-electric power dam,
advanced to the area of the big mili-
tary training center of Wuensdorf,1
15 miles south of Berlin, and the So-
viet power-house was pressing tow-,
ard Zossen-Allied-bomber site of
the German high command head-
quarters.
Between Berlin and Dresden, the
tidal wave of Soviet mechanized pow-
er surged across the Brandenburg
plains on a 58-mile front from cap-
tured Senftenberg south to the out-
skirts of Koenigsbrueck, only 14 miles
northnortheast of Dresden.
Official Report Given
Hurling back suicidal charges by
drunken German troops the Soviet
drive was officially within 48 miles
of the American armies standing on
the Mulde river.
Farther southwest in Austria, Mos-
cow announced that Marshal Rodion
Y. Malinovsky's Second Ukrainian
Army was moving across the plateaus
of the southern approaches to Prague
in a 35-mile front.

Gen. Mark W. Clark told his 15th
Army group that the fall of this an-
cient city of 270,000 'population-
which through the winter's bitter
fighting stood as a defiant German
symbol of resistance-"Represents to
us the beginning of final victory in
Italy."1
Troops smashing into the city met
only light resistance and by tonight
the great pursuit of the Germans was
well under way. San Giovanni, f0
miles northwest of Bologna, was over-
run and Polish troops went on to
score gains northeast of the city.
At the eastern end of the front the
British Eighth Army drove three
miles beyond Portomaggiore, captur-
ing Marrara, and were reported with-
in eight miles of Ferrara, important
communications center just below
the Po River and 30 miles northeast
of Bologna. These troops were driv-
ing to cut off and annihilate seg-
ments of the retreating Germans.
Hoo per Slaying
Susp*lec'ts Held
S eret Witnesses See
Four Men in 'Show-Up'
JACKSON, Mich., April 21.-()-
Four men detained for questioning
concerning the slaying last Jan. 11
of State Senator Warren G. Hooper
were viewed today by secret witnes-
ses at a "show-up" at the state po-
lice post, but what the result may
have been was not disclosed.
Elaborate precautions were taken
by the officers to conceal the iden-
tity of the witnesses.
"We have made progress in the
case," Capt. William Hanson of the
Jackson state police post said, and
added, "We feel we are nearing a
solution."
Capt. Hanson declined to say on
what facts his optimism was based.
Nor would he say whether today's
witnesses were those disclosed early
in the murder investigation to have
seen a maroon-colored automobile
with at least two occupants near and
at the spot where Hooper was found
shot to death.

By PAT CAMERON
Men prominent in Latin-American
education, taxi-drivers who want to
become tourist guides, and house-
wives who want to learn English in
order to understand American movies
and fashion magazines-these and
many other groups are attracted to
the English Language Institute in
Mexico, Dr. Albert H. Markwardt, di-
rector of the Institute in Mexico dur-
ing the past two years and associate
professor of English here, said in an
interview yesterday.
"Fifteen-thousand pzople in Lat-
in America are now learning Eng-
lish in U. S. government-sponsor-
ed projects, and at present there
are no less than 22 cultural in-
stitutes to care for these needs,"
Prof. Marckwardt said.
Supported by the Division of In-
tellectual Cooperation of the State
Department, the English Language
Institute in Mexico is not only teach-
ing English as a foreign language, but
it is also helping Mexicans to teach
English to the Latin-American pub-
lic.
i 'Although this program may be de-
scribed as a general adult education
project, teacher training is an im-
portant aspect of its work. People
from the United States who want to

teach English to their fellow-country-
men receive valuable 'in-service'
training at the Institute," Prof.
Marckwardt explained.
The curriculum comprises three
years of study and emphasizes the
spoken language, with the result
that by the end of the third seme-
ster, the language classes are con-
duced entirely in English. In the
past two years, the enrollment in
Mexico City increased from 150 to
900.
The staff, composed of a majority
of Michigan-trained people, also pre-
pared text materials for the teach-
ing of English. 'Few good text-books
have been' written that are adoptable
for use in teaching English as a for-
eign language," Prof. Marckwardt
said, "but Mrs. Aileen Kitchin and
Miss Virginia French, under the di-
rection of Prof. Charles C. Fries of
the Department of English here, are
preparing materials for publication."
The Institute also acts in an edu-
cational-advisory capacity. Prof.
Marckwardt gave the example of the
Universidad Femenina which was to
begin a program leading to a Mast-
er's degree in literature and which
sought the advice of the Institute in
formulating its curriculum.
In 1943 Prof. Marckwardt was
invited to serve as a visiting pro-
fessor at the National University
Iof Mexico. In this capacity one of
his duties was to direct the Insti-
tute located in the Benamin
Franklin Library in Mexico City.
This semester he resumed his posi-
tion in the University Department
of English.
Other members of the staff who
were trained at the University of
Michigan were Mrs. Marckwardt, Mrs.
Mentor Williams, Miss Estelle Grif-
fiths, Mr. and Mrs. James K. Pas-
serelli, Howard Tessen, and Jane
Griswold.
BUY MORE BONDS

:

GERMAN BARRACKS BLASTED NEAR TRIESTE--Clouds of smoke rise from German occupied bar-
racks at Postumia, 25 miles northeast of Trieste, Italy, after an attack by rocket-firing South African
Air Force Beaufighters of the Balkan Air Force, one of which is shown banking away after firing one
of its rockets. This is a British Official Photo.
1ev. Fai'rnim LET'S SWIM TO MUSIC:
Will Speak at Radios Can Be Water-Proofe
Baptist Church By Insulation of New Silicon
i Pw Th Ag +nr n - ---- C

A

d Film Will Be
e Shown Today

-41

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V

Michigan
S _
-0SO

THURSDAY
April 26

I

Verdi's
"'IL TROVATORE"
SUPERB CAST

Symphony Opera
Orchestra
TICKETS NOW

Curtain at 8:20j
Prices
$1.20, $2.40, $1.80,
$3.00 inc. tax

Corps de Ballet
Box Office
Opens 10 A.M.

Rev. Marlin D. Farnum, assistant
secretary of the American Baptist
Foreign Missions, will be the guest
speaker at the First Baptist Church
today.
Farnum's address at the morning
service will be "The Church's Oppor-
tunity Tomorrow". At the Roger
Williams Guild at 5 p . He will
speak on "Vocational atisfaction".
He will have conferences on Tuesday
and Wednesday afternoons, and
Wednesday evening will speak in the
Guild House on "How Northern Bap-
tists are Organized for Foreign Mis-
sion Service".
Farnum worked for eight years in
the Inland Sea area of Japan, and
for five years in Tokyo where he
acted as mission secretary for the
Baptist work there.
* ~* *
C4
REV. FARNUM
. .. to speak.
Church Guilds
List Programs
. .Y
The Canterbury Club will have
Mary Hayden, a graduate of the
University, and now a member of the
American Red Cross, as its guest
speaker at its meeting today at 5
p.m. EWT (4 p.m. CWT) in St. An-
drew's Episcopal Church.
The third in a series of speeches
on "Love and Marriage" entitled
"Marriage and Home Building" will
be given by the Rev. Eugene Zendt
at 5 p.m. EWT (4 p.m. CWT) today
at the Congregational-Disciples Stu-
The program at the Wesleyan
Guild will include favorite scriptures
and hymns followed by the supper
and fellowship hour at 5 p.m. EWT
(4 p.m. CWT) at the Methodist
Church Guild Hall.
Dr. Franklin Littell will speak on
"Growth Through Cooperation" at
the Westminster Guild at 5 p.m.
EWT (4 p.m. CWT) at the Presby-
terian Church.
The Lutheran Student Association
will entertain the Chinese Christian
group at 5 p.m. EWT (4 p.m. CWT)
today at the parrish hall.
Gamma Delta, the Lutheran stu-
dent club, will have a bike hike along
the Huron River Drive: Members
will meet at 2:30 p.m. EWT (1:30
CWT) in front of the Campus BikeI
Shop.

one or two weeks Championship at Cue Ball
Another silicone is a grease, the
color and consistency of transparent Joe Sobeleski bested opponents
turquoise. There never was a grease Ken Hannah and Wayne Crozier last
like this. It won't melt in a frying night to become pocket billiards
pan with sizzling bacon. It won't
harden at 60 below zero. champion of the University, the
Won't Burn nor Freeze tournament being held in conjunc-
Michigan hunters have been using tion with the "Cue Ball" in the Union
a silicone gun grease and another ballroom.
silicone to keep their boots soft and Sobeleski, who won the finals 50-
waterproof. There is also a silicone 30, first played pool three years ago.
CLASSIFIED AnvfrITISING

'i

i x53 xie rassociaLea rress 1 ski Grease to Slim taster over

MIDLAND, Mich., April 21.-You
can take your radio set in swimming
this summer, if it has been insulated
with silicone, then shake out the
water and dry yourself on the beach
to a jive tune from the set.
Silicone is a new chemical com-
pound, made mainly from sand. Pro-
perly speaking, the name is sili-
cones, for it comes in many forms-
liquid, soft and solid. But all are
from sand.
Dozens of Uses-Discovered
The waterproof radio is only one
of dozens of new uses found for sili-
cones at the Dow Corning Corpora-
tion, where they were developed.
One silicone which looks like water
is a glass polish. Used on eye glasses,
it provides a new surface, leaving the
glasses brilliantly clear. Those who
have tried it say one application lasts

snow.
Had Hitler possessed one of these
silicone greases in his first winter
in Russia, his big guns would not
have become useless at 40 below zero
when their greases hardened and
disintegrated.
One of industry's fire hazards has
been burning electrical insulation,
sometimes from overheated motors.
At Midland a blow-torch was turned
against an electric motor insulated
with a silicone; the insulation did
not catch fire. In 1942 when the
first silicone insulation-a form of
varnish-was used, the motor ran at
the unheard-of heat of nearly 1,000
degrees Fahrenheit without burning
out.
Sobeleski Wins Billiard

"New England," March of Time
film, will be shown at 7:30 p. m. EWT
(6:30 p. mi. CWT) today in the In-
ternational Center, accompanying a
lecture by Prof. Arthur E. Wood of
the sociology department.
Prof. Wood is a native of New
England, and worked with former
president Hoover's Commission on
Home Building and Home Owning.
Author of several books in this field,
he has studied social problems in
Germany.

11

WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE!
Continuous from 1 P.M.
NOW PLAYING

DAY OR NIGHT

LOST AND FOUND

Michigan

Now Showing

LOST: Covert topcoat from Lane
Hall Thursday night. My coat con-
tained Allentown label.yExchange.
Roy Boucher. Lawyer's Club. Phone
4145.
TAN CORVETTE TOP COAT with
block label taken by mistake from
League ball room. Please call Jer-
ry Bloom, 3734.
LOST: Diamond ring in League.
Please call 3808. Carol Hill. Re-
ward.
LOST: Black and white striped
Schaeffer pen lost Friday on cam-
pus. Call 394 Jordan.
LOST: Gold ring, initialed F, on cam-
pus. Sentimental value. Reward!
Call 6232.
LOST: At indoor track meet Sat.,
April 14. Stop watch, probably in
lockers of intramural building. Re-
turn to Marshall Simpson, Owosso
High School, Owosso, Mich. Re-
ward.

LOST: Illinois
gold engraved
and cracked.
Phone 24401.
House.

pocketwatch, white
case. Face chipped
Family heirloom.
Room 306. Wenley

TWO- FINAL TRIBUTE POST-WAR
WAY TOIPNTIWAR
STREET FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT INVENTIONS

r

I. A

FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Two new double breasted
tuxedos, size 36 and 39. Bargain
prices, latest style. Call Bill or
Dirty Dave. 2-4551.
DOUBLE BREASTED TUXEDO, size
38, like new. Reasonable. Box
No. 6, Michigan Daily.
HELP WANTED
BOYS WANTED: In a small league
house. Dinners and good pay. Call
4701.
HELP WANTED: Dishwasher, good
pay. Call 7100. 407 N. Ingalls.

Coming
Thursday!

SUSANNA
FOSTER

TURHAN
BEY

"FRISCO
SAL"

Extra Added

._._. ..ii

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,se'R
/e
( f . e''
:..;;::

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ROOM AND BOARD

BOARD AND ROOM-Available for
16 week semester this summer at
the Lodge, 620 S. State. Call 2-6229.,

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Sprint's In The Air!

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,J:"
Crj
«r
yet:
f,
INN

How about adding
some of our glass-blown
KNICK KNACKS or a
STUFFED ANIMAL to
give your room that
fresh spring look. We're
sure you'll like our

Ili

A

I.,

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