100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 17, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, APRIL 17, 1945 THE MI C HIG AN DAILY ___
Newhouser Will Face Browns in Season's Opener I

.w . !

,1.

'A,

'A.

'A., .L.

Most Valuable Player Will Try
Michigan Nine Faces Detroit Today TO Keep His Jinx on Champs
Wanlvptinp See I't k F rth iMh WnIStarting Lineup Inludes Webb, Ross, Maier

V - qjA V ,JL Divb 7U . 5.! wL4 .+' 7i J - u... v rAl5
First Bi Ten Tilt with Illinois
Pitchers Hackstadt, Peddy Please Ray Fisher;
Kell, Lund Top Hitters in Grosse Isle Game

By BUD ROVIT
Back in Ann Arbor after ad-
ministering a double defeat to two
Grosse Isle Naval Base nines, 11-1
and 9-5, Sunday, the Wolverine base-
ball team is all set for the University
of Detroit, 4:00 p. m. EWT, this
afternoon at Ferry Field.
According to all reports on the De-
troit squad, it is rated as a little less
formidable than Western Michigan,
due mainly to their ace twirler, Jerry
Cunningham, who will probably take
the mound against Michigan today.
Wolverines Win Three
- The Maize and Blue, by dint of
The Winners!
FIRST GAME
Michigan .......022 321 1 11 13 0
Naval Air Station 100 00+ 0 1 5 4
Peddy, Markward, Morin, and Ste-
venson; Yerkes; James and Brokan.

tion, as Peddy, Markward, Morin,
Hackstadt, and Morrison, all hurl-
ed' for Michigan.
Coach Fisher Pleased
Although the games were played
under the worst possible conditions,
high winds and brittle cold weather,
Fisher was quite pleased with the
performance of his mound staff, espe-
cially Jack Hackstadt and Jack Ped-
dy.
Top hitters of the day, were Walt
Kell, Maize and Blue third baseman,
who continued his Saturday's hitting
spree, as he hammered out a homer, a
triple, and three singles, and Don
Lund, versatile left fielder, whose big
bat finally came to life with a re-
sounding round-tripper, a double, and
a brace of base bingles.
The Wolverines garnered a total of
24 safeties in the doubleheader, but
this record was slightly modified by
the .fact that the games were played
on an exceedingly fast diamond, and
against comparatively mediocre
pitching.

Takbh9 the Ceunt
By DAVE LOEWENBERG
Associate Sports editor
WITH FEW EXCEPTIONS, amateur and professional athletes in the
U. S. measured up to the highest standards of good taste, as the world
mourned the passing of our 32nd President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
However, it's these few exceptions which deserve special treatnent.
An A. A. U. official declared that it was a "physical impossibility
for the women's swimming championships to be either cancelled or
postponed." After meditating over this profound statement the official
reversed himself and decided to have the girls swim on Saturday
morning instead of in the afternoon. What a noble gesture!'
TIDE A. A. U.'s desire to return to normalcy is evidenced by another official
satement made during one of our most critical moments of the war.
A great reception was promised for German and Japanese athletes imme-
diately upon the termination of hostilities. The boys in the front lines
certainly must have appreciated this so-called attempt at good-will.
All the baseball circuits excepting the Pacific Coast League prompt-
ly cancelled all activities. However, President Clarence Rowland out
on the West Coast said that all games would be played as scheduled.
This, to my way of thinking, makes the Pacific Coast just another
bush league, instead of a training ground for the Major leagues.:
Across the border at Tijuana, the racing program was dispensed
with, but over in Toronto, our Canadian neighbors decided to continue
with the Stanley Clp playoffs.
These few isolated cases are certainly not indicative of the reactions
of sports personalities in general. The few dissenters must feel rather
lonely in their little ivory tower.

By The Associated Press
ST. LOUIS, April 16-Hal New-
houser, the oily American League
pitcher who beat the champion St.
Louis Browns four times in 1944,
fairly enough gets the first crack at
the Brownies in the new American
League race, drawing the opening
day assignment as the runner-up De-
troit Tigers collide with the champs
here tomorrow in the 1945 lid-lifter.
Newhouser, winningest pitcher in
the Major Leagues with a 29-9 rec-
Ord for last season when he was
chosen the American League's Most
Valuable Player, will be opposed by
St. Louis' Sig Janucki, 13-game win-
ner of last year.
Three Newcomers
Three new faces were listed among
the Tiger "regulars" named by man-
ager Steve O'Neill as his opening day
lineup.
Shortstop Jimmy (Skeeter) Webb,
acquired from the Chicago White
Sox in a deal for Joe Orengo, holds
an infield job and the leadoff post
in the Detroit batting order.
Third baseman Don Ross, a utility
man who saw more service last year
in the Detroit outfield, replaces Mike
(Pinky) Higgins, lost to the Navy,
and Rookie Bob Maier, a third base-
man with Buffalo last season, moved
to left field to replace swatting Dick

Along with Old Regulars According to O'Neill

SECOND GAME
Michigan.......301 300 2
CASU..... ...000 000 5

9 11 2
5 3 5

Sunday's twin triumphs, are boast-
ing a non-Conference three win,
one loss record, going into today's
game, and this weekend will inaugu-
rate the Baseball Conference for the
'45 season, when they oppose Illinois
at Ann Arbor.
Sunday's practice games were pri-
marily for Coach Ray Fisher to see
the rest of his pitching staff in ac-
Keep A-Head of Your Hair
Our "crew cuts" and personality
styles are designed to fit your in-
dividual needs.
THE DASCOLA BARKERS
Between Mich. and State Theatres
Continuous from 1 P M.
weu oa wr flr TFav

1876 WAS NEVER LIKE WARTIME 19,45:
Rookies Get Best Opportunity To Stck in Majors

Wakefield, also back in the Navy aft-
er a banner year as Detroit's leading
hitter.
Regulars Back
Holdover regulars are back at all
the other starting posts with Roger
(Doe) Cramer in center field, Jim
Outlaw in right, Rudy York on first,
Eddie Mayo at second and Paul
Richards and Bob Swift behind the
plate. Joe Hoover, regular shortstop
through most of the 1944 campaign,
is fighting it out with Ross fgr the
third base job.
Big Al Benton, tentative choice to
pitch the Tigers' home opener next
Friday against Cleveland, has re-
placed Ruff Gentry, a holdout, as
the Tigers' fourth starting pitcher.
Others, besides Newhouser, are Paul
(Dizzy) Trout, 27-game winner in
1944, and Frank (Stubby) Overmire,
0-
Probable Lineups
DETROIT ST. LOUIS
Webb, ss- Gutteridge, 2b.
Mayo, 2b. Gray, If.
Walker, rf. Kreevich, cf.
York, 1b. Stephens, ss.
Cramer, cf. Martin, rf.
Hostetler, If. McQuinn, 1b.
Hoover, 3b. Schulte, 3b.
Swift, c. Mancuso, c.
Newhouser, p. Jakucki, p.
who won 11 and lost 11 a year ago.
Three Relief Hurlers
Chief pitching support for that
quartet must come from among Les
Mueller, Army dischargee, Zeb Eaton
and Rookie Walter Wilson, who loom
as most likely relief chuckers.
The Browns, favored by a slight
edge in the balloting to retain their
title, will start the season with sub-
stantially the same players who won
last year's pennant by one game.
Jakucki had three victories over
Detroit against two losses last year.
Maxim Defeats
Brown i Tenth
DETROIT, April 16.-(P)- Pvt.
Joey Maxim of Cleveland out-punch-
ed Clarence Brown, 200, of Chicago
to gain a unanimous ten-round:deci-
sion tonight before 1.784 spectators
at Arcadia.
Brown, who held a 12-pound
weight advantage over his opponent,
who weighed 188, was unable to cope
with a straight left jab with which
Maxim jolted him from start to fin-
ish.

By JOIE REICHLER
.Associated Press Staff Writer
Nd W YORK, Apgil 16-(P)-The
fourth wartime Major League base-
ball season which gets under way to-
morrow will provide the biggest op-
portunity for rookies since the first
professional league was organized in
1876.
Approximately 120 newcomers will
be trying to make their marks in the
"big time" with about 25 appearing
Coopers Settle
Salary Dispute
CHICAQQ, April 16.- ?(P)- The
world champion St. Louis Cardinals,
cheered by an 11th hour truce in the
salary dispute of the stellar Cooper
brothers, open their National League]
title defense tomorrow against the
promising Chicago Cubs at Wrigley
Field.
The high-powered battery of Mort
and Walker Cooper temporarily end-
ed a stalemate with club president
Sam Breadon over a demand for
$3,000 annual pay hike will be in uni-
form when the Cards and Cubs
square off at 1:30 CWT, with Walker
Cooper scheduled to catch.
It was expected, however, -that
manager Billy Southworth of the
Cardinals would nominate Blix Don-
nelly, star reliefer of the 194.4 World
Series, to replace Mort as the sched-
uled starting pitcher

in the opening day lineups. Never
before have so many new names dot-
ted the rosters of Big League clubs.
Room For Youngsters
The war's drain on manpower and
its continued demands on the game's
personnel has made room for many
a youngster who ordinarily would still
be in the minors absorbing much
needed knowledge.
Gone are such stars of last year as
Stan Musial, Dick Wakefield, Bobby
Doerr, Ray .Mueller, Pinky Higgins,
and others. Taking their places will
be over-age and under-age players,
4-F's and some discharged veterans.
Large Turnout Expected
Obviotisly, playing standards will
be lowered. But that the fans will
turn out is evident by the estimated
opening day attendances which is
expected to total approximately 150,-
000 for the eight inaugurals. The
ceremonial Washington opeper which
usually precedes the regular inaugu-
rals by one day, was postponed today
due to inclement weather.
Estimated opening day attendances
for tomorrow's openings are as fol-
lows:
AMERICAN LEAGUE-Boston at
New York (25,000), Chicago at Cleve-
land (18,000), Washington at Phila-
delphia (10,000), Detroit at St. Louis
(7,500).
NATIONAL LEAGUE-Pittsburgh

at Cincinnati (29,000), St. Louis at
Chicago (20,000), Philadelphia at
Brooklyn (22,000) New York at Bos-
ton (15,000).
With every club presenting new
faces in the opening day lineups,
rookies may play an important part
in the pennant races of both leagues.
The pennant winning Browns in the
American League, favored to repeat,

will introduce outfielders Boris (Babe)
Martin and one-armed Pete Gray.
The Tigers, generally' conceded to
give the Browns the stiffest opposi-
tion, will present outfielder Bobby
Maier who will attempt to fill the
large shoes of Wakefield.
In the National League, the world
champion Cardinals are favored to
gain their fourth straight flag.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

- Today and

Wednesday -

Also
DISNEY CARTOON
ROOSEVELT BIOGRAPHY
LATEST WORLD NEWS

CLASSIFIED
f RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of l0c for each
additional. five words.)
Non-Contract
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. s(In-
crease of 25c for each
additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
LOST AND FOUND
GOLD PIN with registered emerald
lost at Slide Rule. Reward offered.
Call Janice Pollak. 2-3225.
LOST: Black and white striped
Schaeffer pen lost Friday on cam-
pus. Call 394 Jordan.
LOST: Brown zipper wallet between
Union and Washtenaw. Finder keep
money, please return papers. Vir-
ginia Kowalski. Phone 1421. Ex-
tension 2147.
BLUE AND SILVER PARKER "51"
pen lost Friday between West Med.
and Washtenaw. Call 4121 Ext.
2147. Reward.
LOST WALLET: Please send me
papers and pictures. You can have
wallet and money. Marian Heil-
man, 604 S. State.

TAILORING and PRESSING
CAMELET BROTHERS, tailors, 1119
S. University. Remodel clothes for
men and women. Relining, reweav-
ing. Also make hand-made button
holes.
FOR SALE
FORMAL DRESS SUIT of tails. Re-I
cently purchased and never worn.
Reasonable. Call 2-1336.
FOR SALE: Farms and lands, Ann
Arbor, 5 miles west, 50 acres,
$6,000.00. Good for post war
building. Restricted, good road.
Call evenings and Sundays, Ann
Arbor 6196.
ROOM AND BOARD
ENGAGE ROOM AND BOARD for
summer session. Chi Omega, 1503
Washtenaw. Phone 24808.

4v RECORDSow

A GREAT BOOKBECOMES THE
YEAR'S SCREEN, MASTERPIECE!
"Will be hard to match all year long for tops in enter-
tainment." -Valter Winchell
Rooney Ia se-
4zious role! '+

«.:.
...
..
uo ' '
., *.

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Kitchen help, 70c
per hour, 12:15-2:15 p. m. Pinafore
Rest. One block E. of Rackhiarn
on Huron. Phone 6737,

AT THE
RADIO RKORD SHOP
715 N. UNIVERSITY

_ _ . __ _
i

I1

A CLARENCE BROWN
PRODUCTION

1

Elizabeth Taylor
has scars in nflu
her eyes!
. STARRING
Mickey RONEY
Donald Crisp:*:)
ilitro takea DONALD CR ISP
ELIZABETH TAYLOR
Anne REVERE:- Angelo LANSBURY
Jackie JENKINS -"Arthur TREACHER
Anr Revere, who

Swie c/nic
PRESENTS
AMUSING COMIDY
by
Riri>os Qarrio and Vital Az
rr

a timeless perf
for a
timely inoment
le t iate
Hlour
perfauie ~

fume,
hi'. r/ '..
S1 ..
~ndelica t xtic,

a perfume that is
truly a prelude

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan