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April 15, 1945 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-15

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wolverine Nine Avenges First Defeat by Br

oncos

Spring Grid Drills Yield
Nucleus for Fall Eleven
Ace Linemen Watts, Lintol, Freihofer Return;
Newcomers Foltz, Johnson, Albin Stand Out
With two weeks of spring drill behind it, the 75-man Michigan grid
squad is shaping into a nucleus around which the 1945 football eleven will
eventually form.
Three lettermen from last year's team lead the field of aspirants. They
are centers Harold Watts and John Lintol, and Cecil Freihofer, who covered
the end position.
Watts, who played sparkling ball in 1944, shining particularly in the

iakin9 the ikan4d
By HANK MANTHO
Daily Sports Editor

Western Michigan Held to Four Hits
As Louthen Fans 16 in 5-1_Triumph

Ohio State game, is dominating th
SoftballTem
Needed To Fill
IM Schedules
Entries for four I-M softball
leagues have beenucoming in, but
more are needed to fill out the sched-
ules, Howard Leibee, director of
Waterman Gym and supervisor of
the I-M program, has announced.
Twelve teams,, representing en-
trants in the Independent, Service,
General Fraternity, and Professional
Fraternity, have already been secur-
ed, Leibee said. Other teams wish-
ing to enter should contact either
Leibee at Waterman. or Earl Riskey
at the I-M Building.
Games will be scheduled for Sat-
urday afternoon beginning April 21,
Leibee said, but may be played at
other times arranged by the teams.
Following several weeks of round-
robin play within each league, the
two top teams in each will run off a
tournament to determine the campus
champions. Awards will be given to
the winners, Leibee said.
Flyers, Red Wings
E xchange Players
ST. LOUIS, April 14-( P)-The St.
Louis Flyers of the American Hockey
League acquired five players from
the Detroit Red Wings of the Na-
tional League in exchange for two
players in a deal announced today
by the Flyers.
The two St. Louis players trans-
ferred to the Detroit roster are Vic
Lynn, wing and defenseman, and
Carl (Winky) Smith, wingman.
Coming to the Flyers are Dick
Kowcinack, Francis (Red) Kane, Wil-
liam Thomson, Ted Garvin and
George De Felice.

e competition for the center berth.
,He is also imparting his experience
and ability to the young freshman
hopefuls.
Lintol, who last year alternated
with Watts at the center position, has
suddenly pulled a switch and decided
to try his hand at tackle. It is im-
possible to say whether anything will
come of this, but "Biggie" Munn,
Wolverine head line coach, has hopes
that the Naval trainee will shape
into a power-man in that position.
The third member of the triumvi-
rate of returning lettermen, Cecil
Freihofer, a civilian, is also delving
into the field of experimentation by
transferring himself from the end to
the guard ,position. If he works out
successfully in this capacity, the
Maize and Blue coaches will have the
nucleus of a strong line around which
to build the prospective starting sev-
en, come summer practice.
Promising newcomers who have
caught the eye of the Wolverine
football mentors are Foltz, a fullback
from Toledo; Johnson, who played
tackle at Mt. Pleasant; and Albin, also
from Mt. Pleasant, who performs at
the center berth.
The squad has not run through any
scrimmages as yet, concentrating
mainly on dummy work, passing,
kicking and punting drills, signal
practice, and wind sprint and physi-
cal conditioning drills. Coach Munn
announced that the team will not
work out in uniform until July 2.
Leibee Takes
Summer Post
Howard Leibee, Assistant Super-
visor of the Department of Physical
Education and Athletics and Direct-
or of Waterman Gym for the past
three years, has revealed his appoint-
ment as a member of the School of
Education faculty at the University
of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, for
the summer session.

GOING INTO the second day of the National Women's A.A.U. Swimming
Championships in Chicago, Ann Curtis, sensational record-breaker
from San Francisco, is still picked to monopolize the spotlight by the
aquatic experts.
Eighteen-year-old Ann Curtis will not only be defending her 220
and 440-yard freestyle titles, but she will also be renewing her 100-
yard feud with movie-bound Brenda Helser, who defeated Ann in this
freestyle event by inches last year.
In addition to these attractions, Curtis will be the first woman athlete
and the first swimmer to win the James E. Sullivan Memorial Award.
This high honor will be accorded to the feminine artist for her feats
last summer of smashing two world and four American. records, as well
as holding the outdoor A.A.U. titles at 100, 400, 800 and 1500 meters. She
outpolled the leading male contenders in the athletic field for 1944 to
corral the sportsmanship trophy, which has already installed her in a
separate class with athletes of her sex.
Ann holds a national record for each of her 18 years, and her
prowess in swimming is detrimental to any female mermaid who has
cherished national championship aspirations, which fact is causing no
end of consternation among various coaches in swimming circles.
C URTIS FIRST ATTRACTED public acclaim in 1943 by winning the na-
tional junior 220-yard freestyle title in a race which was four seconds
faster than the winning senior time.
A year later in San Francisco, Ann's feat of breaking four American
and two world's records all in one day, was a performance equalled only by
Johnny Weismuller in the early '20's.
Patricia Sinclair of the New York Women's Swimming Association,
100-yard breast stroke champion in 1944, is the only other defending
champion besides Curtis and Helser out of the 50 hand-picked com-
petitors.
Some of the other contenders include such stars as Jo Ann Fogle of
the Indianapolis Riviera Club, outdoor 100-yard back stroke and individual
medley champion; Mrs. Jane Dillard Kittleson of Fort Worth, Tex., outdoor
bzreaststroke champion; Tiny Zoe Ann Olsen of the .Athens Club, Oakland,
Calif., and Dorothy Zigler of the Chicago Town Club, 1944 runners-up in
diving; and Betty Shields of New York, who came in second in the back-
stroke last year.

Bill Gregor Leads
Attack with Homer
By BUD ROVIT
As Ray Louthen limited Western
Michigan to fourhits vhile striking
out 16, Michigan's baseball squad
bounced back from Friday's defeat
to trounce the Broncos, 5-1, and hang
up its first victory of the season.
The Wolverines took a one-run
lead in the first inning on Bill Greg-
or's home run with none on, and
added two more in each of the fifth
and eighth innings.
Western picked up its lone tally in
the fourth to tie the score momen-
tarily. Bob Stevenson, Michigan
catcher, dropped a third strike on
Jimmy Brown, putting him on first.{
Brown moved to second on a sacri-
fice and came home on Glenn Selbo's
single to right.
In the Wolverine half of the fifth,
Tom Rosema reached first safely on
Selbo 's err or and Dom Tomasi walk-
ed. After working a successful doubleI
steal as Louthen struck out, both
scored on Walt Kell's timely single.
Michigan sewed up the game in
the eighth as Kell looped a Texas
League double into right-center and
scored on Gregor's triple to right. Bill
Nelson walked and promptly worked
the double steal with Gregor, the
latter scoring on the play.
Bill Gregor led the Wolverine at-
tack with three hits, picking up a
single in the sixth in addition to his
homer and triple. Kell contributed a
single and a double, while Jack Weis-
enburger accounted for the other
safety. The Broncos' four hits were

divided among as many players.
Louthen was in control of the game
at all times. In the seventh inning,
Western bunched two of its four hits
but was unable to score, as Louthen
bore down to strike out Lyle Peters,
and Stevenson picked Jim Marks off
first.
Tom Urquhart, Bronco twirler,
notched five strikeouts and held the

Wolverines fairly well in check until
the eighth when he began to tire.
Two of the five runs scored off his
delivery were unearned.
Michigan will play its next home
game at 3 p. gyn. CWT (4 p. m. EWT)
Tuesday on Ferry Field against the
University of Detroit. Today, the
Wolverines travel to Grosse le Naval
Base for a double-header.

.f

Big, Bas Begin to Boom

MICHIGANA
Kell, 3b .........
Weisenburger, ss
Gregor, If......
Lund, cf.........
Nelson, rf .......
Hackstadt, lb ... .
*Rosema, lb .... .
Tomasi, 2b ......

AB R HE

4
4
4
4
. 1
1
3
1

1
0
2
0
0
0
1
1
0
0

2
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

O A
0 1
1 2
0 0

WESTERN M.

0
0
4
7
1
16
0

0
0
0
0
2
4
0

Mudie, cf . .
Brown, ss
Throop, 2b
Selbo, 3b .
Krupa, If..
Marks, c
Peters, rf . .
Christenson,
*Perrin, lb
Urquhart, p
"Minion ..

1b ..

AB R
4 0
.3 1
.3 0
.40
.40
.3 0
.3 0
0 0
.3 0
1 0

H
0
10
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0

E
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

O
3
2
4
1
6
1
0
0

A
0
0
0
1
0
2
0

i

Stevenson, e.
Louthen, p
TOTALS

.. 3
.3
.30

TOTALS ..

.30 1 4 1 24 8

5 6 3 27 91

*Substitute for Hackstadt in 4th. I

*Substituted for Christenson in 8th.
**Batted for Christenson in 8th.

34

-A

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(Continued from Page 4)
ain, O., will be in our office Tuesday,
April 17, to interview senior mechan-
ical, electrical, and metallurgical en-
gineers. Those interested should call
Bureau of Appointments, University
Ext. 371, for appointment.
City of Detroit Civil Service An-
nouncements for the following exam-
inations have been received in our
office. Junior City Planner, $2415 to
$2760, Intermediate City Planner,
$3036 to $3450, Junior Publicist,
$2700, Intermediate Publicist, $3450,
Junior Social Economist, $2484 to]
$2760, and Intermediate Social. Eco-
nomist, $3164 to $3450. For further
information stop in at 201 Mason
Hall, Bureau of Appointments.
United States Civil Service an-
nouncement for Substitute Clerk-
.Carrier, Post Office Service, .forkem-
ployment in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Substitutes salary 65 cents an hour.
Appointments are made from $1700
and up. For further information stop.
in at 201 Mason Hall. Bureau of Ap-
pointments.
State of Michigan Civil Service an-
nouncements for Manual worker C,
salary $115 to $132.25 per month,
Farmer B, $132.25 to $155.25, Farmer'
A, $155.25 to $170, and Farm Fore-
man AI, $166.75 to $189.75, have been
received in our office. For further
information stop in at 201 Mason
Hall. Bureau of Appointments.
Lectures
University Lecture: Miss Helen M.

Martin of the Department of Conser-
vation will speak on the life of "Doug-
lass Houghton," on Thursday, April
19 at 3:15, in the Rackham Amphi-
theater, under the auspices of the
Department of Geology. The public is
cordially invited.
Concerts
Organ Recital: The Organ recital
by Frieda Vogan, announced for!
today at 3:15 (CWT), in Hill Audi-
torium has been cancelled on account
of the Memorial Service for the late
President Roosevelt._
Exhibit of items relating to the
career of Douglass Houghton, first
State Geologist of Michigan and pio-
neer in the development of Michigan
copper, in Rm. 160, Rackham Build-
ing by the Michigan Historical Col-
lections, from April 16-April 20.
Events Today
Latin-American Society: There will
be a meeting at 2:00 p.m. in Rm. 305,
Union, to determine when the Pan
American Ball will be held.
Lecture by Fuad S. Hassan on
"Near Eastern Architecture" at 6:30
p.m. today in the International Cen-
ter, followed by a social hour. The
program is open to the public.
Coming Events
Workshop on Anti-Semitism: The
Workshop will hold its next meeting
on Monday, April 16, at 6:30 CWT at

the Hillel Foundation. Featured will
be Dr. Franklin H. Littell, Director
of the Student Religious Association,
in a discussion on "The Religious
Aspects of Anti-Semitism". All those
interested are invited to attend.
There will be a Leadership Train-
ing program sponsored by the Coun-
cil of Social Agencies, Monday, April
16, from 6:30 to 8:30 at the YMCA.
Dr. Welling of Wayne University will
talk on crafts, and then the group
will divide into interest groups ac-
cording to the craft you would like
most to learn about. Open to all who
are interested.
Monday Evening Drama Section,
Faculty Women's Club, Monday, April
16, 7:45 p.m., library of the Unitarian
Church.
The Research Clubs: The annual
Memorial Meeting will be held in the
Amphitheater of the Rackham Buil-
ding on Wednesday evening, April
18, at 7 o'clock (Central War Time).
Professor Hereward T. Price will read
a paper on "Henry Bradley" and
Professor Ernest F. Barker one on
"Wilhelm Conrad Bradley".
The twenty-eighth State Cham-
pionship Debate of the Michigan High
School Forensic Association will be
held at 2:00 p.m. (CWT), Friday,
April 20, in the auditorium of the
Kellogg Institute. Th'e Eastern High
School of Lansing will uphold the af-
(Continued on Page 8)

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