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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1945 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHITGAN DjAILY _________

Sees

Nazi

Guerilla

Warfare;

TAX LOAD TOOHEAVY:
Dean Stevenson Questions
Promise of 60 Millio.Jobs

MacArthur Heads Army Forces in Pacific

STATUF RESI~S Onivi
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NAHIA AIRFELD' Bay
k ~ Yonadbaru
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o 4'KUTAKA
toman, ,.
Gushichan
CAPE CH-AMUJ

Nimitz Takes
Over Navy in
Pacific Theater

Arnold To Continue
Commander of AAF

as

By The Associated Press

YANKS ADVANCE ON OKINAWA
-Arrows indicate American drives
on Okinawa toward Yontan Hill, to
the eastern coast and south to
Kuba and to within six miles of
Naha.

By DAVID J. WILKIE
Associated Press Correspondent
DETROIT, April 5-The appoint-
ment of Henry P. Nelson to aid in
the reconversion of the automotive
industry to peacetime production was
announced today by J. A. Krug,
chairman of the War Production
Board.
Nelson, who has been director of
WPB's aircraft division, will retain
that office, Krug said.
Automotive Conference
Krug came to Detroit today to con-
sult automotive men on the industry's
reconversion problems and following
an all afternoon session said, "We did
not talk about automobile production
at all. No new cars will be approved
until the collapse of Germany and
maybe for some time after that."
The WPB chairman said some time
was spent in consideration of the var-
ious preliminaries, such as machine
tool equipment, plant re-arrangement
and other technical questions that
must be disposed of before automobile
production can be resumed.
No Civilian Production
He said that a story, given consid-
erable circulation today, to the ef-
fect that passenger automobiles would
be in production next fall with the
authorization of the WPB "is not
true."
"We are using all the materials and
manpower the country has to keep
the war going and until that situa-
tion eases, it will not be possible to
think of civilian car production,"
Krug said.

WASHINGTON, April 5.-General
Douglas MacArthur will command
all Army forces in the Pacific theater
and Admiral Chester W. Nimitz all
naval forces in that theater, the joint
chiefs-of staff announced tonight.
General Henry H. Arnold, Com-
manding General of the U.S. Army
Air Forces, as well as the far-ranging
20th (B-29) Air Force, will continue
in command of the 20th Air Force.
Command Entire Area
The announcement said the joint
chiefs of staff will continue to exer-
cise strategic direction of the entire
Pacific theater and will charge either
General MacArthur or Admiral Nim-
itz with the over-all responsibility
for conducting specific operations or
campaigns.
The joint chiefs of staff is an all-
United States group of high Army
and Navy officials. It is differen-
tiated from the combined chiefs of
staff, a British-American strategic
high command.
The new Pacific arrangement per-
mits either commander - in - chief
(MacArthur or Nimitz) to conduct
operations or campaigns in any part
of the entire theater as directed by
the joint chiefs of staff.
Responsibility Varies
The choice as to which shall be
charged with the responsibility in
each case will depend on the nature
of the operation or campaign which
is to be undertaken.
Under the arrangement, each com-
mander will furnish the forces and
resources of his service for the joint
forces which are required for the
conduct of any operation or com-
mand directed by the joint chiefs of
staff.
MacArthur has been the comman-
der-in-chief in the Southwest Pacific
and Nimitz in the Pacific Ocean
areas.
In effect these two theaters now
become one, with a top commander
for Army forces and a top comman-
der for naval forces.
Maurer To Talk
At Hillel Today
Prof. Wesley H. Maurer of the
journalism department will speak on
"Dare We Educate for Democracy"
when he leads the second in a series
of fireside discussions at 8:30 p. m.
today at the Hillel Foundation.
In his lecture, Prof. Maurer will
answer such questions as: "Is lip-ser-
vice to democracy enough, "Are prop-
aganda and education in conflict?"
and, "Is there good and bad prop-
aganda?"
Sabbath eve services will be held
at 7:45 p. in., and a social hour will
follow the discussion.
WLB Warns Lewis
Of Seizure of Mines
WASHINGTON, April 5--(P)-The
War Labor Board tonight warned
John L. Lewis that unless work stop-
pages in approximately 200 bitumi-
nous coal mines end promptly "the
government will have no alternative
but to seize and operate the mines
on strike."
WLB chairman Geoi'ge W. Taylor
addressed a telegram to Lewis as
president of the United Mine Work-
ers and John J. O'Leary, UMW vice
president, saying mine strikes are
interfering with production of steel
and other war materials.

NEW YORK, April 5-(I)-The
program for the repatriation of 12
to 15 million prisoners of war and
labor conscripts, emerging from under
the Nazi heel, is described in the May
issue of the American Magazine.
Herbert H. Lehman, Director Gen-
eral of the United Nations Relief and
Rehabilitation Administration, writes
that the UNRRA, in collaboration
with Supreme Headquarters, the Al-
lied Expeditionary Force, and many
European governments, has worked
out plans for repatriating the up-
rooted, as soon as the word is given
by the military and the governments
involved.
Multilateral agreements provide aI
reciprocal arrangement under which
each government pledges itself to
take care of the nationals of other

governments found within its bor-
ders.
Lehman also announces an agree-
ment with Allied headquarters, under
which UNRRA will provide 4,000
trained persons to operate 400 assem-
bly centers for displaced civilians and
refugees.
In the assembly centers the dis-
placed persons will be registered, giv-
en physical examinations and freed
of vermin.
They will be screened to weed out
spies, saboteurs and others in the
services of possible Nazi underground
movements.
For the stateless wayfarers, more
I permanent quarters will be establish-
ed. For others, transportation will be
provided as soon as possible by their
own governments or by Allied armies.

MARINES STORM ASHORE ON OKINAWA-Landing from Am-
tracks, U. S. Marines, part of the American force that invaded Japanese
Ryukyu island of Okinawa, move inland after hitting the beach.
(AP wirephoto from Signal Corps)
Lehman Describes Programfo
Repatriating Europe's Homeless

"The present tax structure acts as
a deterrent to the fulfillment of the
60 million-job promise to the extent
that it discourages potential entre-
preneurs from establishing new en-
terprises," Dean Russell A. Stevenson
of the School of Business Administra-
tion declared in an interview yester-
day.
Dean Stevenson has been. a gov-
ernor of the Smaller War Plants
Corporation and has written and ed-
ited several books on accounting,
banking, and economics.
Emphasizing that the bulk (about
90 per cent) of employment in the
post war period will be in private en-
terprise and that the majority of
workers will be employed in small
establishments, Dean Stevenson de
clared, "It will be necessary to stim-
ulate the establishment of small busi-
nesses for the creation of those 60
million jobs."
Puts Brake on Investment
"The present federal tax structure
on businesses tends to put a brake
on private investment," according to
Dean Stevenson. "A person obviously
is not going to risk his own or bor-
rowed capital if in case of successful
operation, the bulk of the income is
taxed away.
"It isn't a question of insuring pro-
fits to the individual entering busi-
ness. It is a question of creating a
chance for establishing profits in case
the business is successful," he said.
Without that chance for gaining
large profits,.Dean Stevenson declar-
ed, people are not going to risk their
capital in new enterprises-the new
Forestry Camp
ToBeOpened.
Practical Experience
Is Offered to Students
The summer camp held each year
in the Upper Peninsula for forestry
students interested in gaining prac-
tical experience in their field will be
open this year from June 25 to Oct.
5, Prof. Robert Craig of the forestry
school said yesterday.
"The aim of the camp is to give the
student a good insight into the kind
of work he will do when he has fin-
ished his professional training,"
Prof. Craig explained.
Located in Iron County about 17
miles west of Iron River, the camp,
named for Prof. Philbert Roth who
first organized forestry instruction at
the University, is within the boun-
daries of the Ottawa National Forest.
Students have an opportunity to ob-
serve the methods of the Federal
Forest Service and the camp keeps
in close .contact with the Michigan
Conservation Commission so that
campers will be able to see the work
of the state organization.
Craig Appointed to
State Commission
Prof. Robert Craig of the School of
Forestry and Conservation has been
appointed to the State Planning
Commission, whose aim is to increase
the number of industries in the state
which manufacture products out of
wood.
Since Michigan has an abundant
supply of raw timber, Prof. Craig is
investigating wood industries outside
of Michigan in order to find new
ideas for products which may be
manufactured within the state.
BUY WAR BONDS

enterprises we will need for the crea-
tion of 60 million jobs.
Difficult For Small Business
"Smaller enterprises have been
finding it increasingly difficult, in re-
cent years," he continued, "to find
risk capital. It has been easy for.
those in a good position to get com-
mercial loans from banks. But those
wishing to start a new enterprise or
to expand an old one have been find,
ing it difficult to get share capital."
Of the two methods suggested by
Dean Stevenson for meeting this dif-
ficulty, he prefers the development of
private agencies to extend loans to
new enterprises. Local agencies of
this sort, lie said, an example of
which is Venture Capital, Inc., in
New England, have developed all
over the country. Venture Capital,
Inc., he asserted, is subscribed by lo-
cal citizens interested in promoting
new enterprise in the city, thus
spreading risk over a large group of
civic-minded individuals. "It is like-
ly," Dean Stevenson declared, "that
a number of civic groups of this sort
may be stimulated in the post-war
period to encourage individuals with
ideas but little capital to secure funds
and to start new business enter-
prises."
Federal Aid is Possibility
The other method mentioned by
Dean Stevenson by which individuals
desiring to start new enterprises may
be supplied with capital is federal aid.
One proposal in this direction, he
said, is that the Smaller War Plants
Corporation, which is now aiding
small war plants, continue to extend
capital loans to small enterprises in
the post-war period.
The G. I. Bill of Rights, according
to Dean Stevenson, provides liberal
terms for loans to veterans who plan
to establish their own businesses.
Dean Stevenson believes, however,
that adjustment of the tax structure
to encourage the development of more
new enterprises woild be more desir-
able than the development of new
agencies on the part of the govern-
ment.
WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE
DAY OR NIGHT
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Now Payng
SZZING LOV!
with
PHILIP
DOR N
Also
NAVY Rough And
NURSE Tumble
CARTOON - NEWS
Coming Sunday
"TO H AV E AN D
r HAVE NOT"

'1,

4

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Y

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Kitchen help, 70c
per hour, 12:15-2:15 p. m. Pinafore
Rest. One block E. of Rackham
on Huron. Phone 6737.
PROXY PARENT WANTED. Re-
liable girl to sit with one year old
girl during May festival concert.
For details and terms, see Hetenyi,
730 South State.
FEMALE HELP WANTED: Women
or girls for lunch counter and soda
fountain. If you are in need of
part time, evening, or week end
employment, contact Mr. B. John-
son at 226 S. Main St.

A series of country-wide immuniza-
tion clinics for smallpox and diph-
theria, under the sponsorship of the
Washtenaw County Medical Society
and the county health department,
will begin Monday according to Dr.
Otto K. Engelke, director of the de-
partient.
A marked increase in the number
of diphtheria cases has been noted,
Dr. Engelke said, and health author-
ities believe that immunization and
testing of children in the county can
prevent a serious epaidemic. Work in
the clinics will be carried on by local
physicians as a contribution to the
war effort, lie stated.
Dr. Engelke urged that parents
bring children, between nine months
and school age, to the clinics. School-
age children will be taken care of
through the school systems.

ward. Call 4315. Constance Freed-
man, 2006 Washtenaw.
$5 REWARD: For a silver filagree
bracelet, lost on campus or U. high
playground March 17. Gift of
brother in Navy. Mary Lea Bird.
920 Monroe St. Phone 2-1241.
LOST: Glasses. Colorless, shell rims,
in brown case. Vicinity of campus.
Call 6118, evenings.
LOST: tan wallet, corner No. Uni-
versity and State St. Friday after-
noon. Reward $5.00. Call 6630.
LOST: Ladies watch, Mido. Between
Stockwell and State St. Karen Hol-
mes, 4002 Stockwell. Reward.
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
comfortable three room apartment
with woman. East of University,
convenient. Call 2-6467.
TAILORING and PRESSING
CAMELET BROTHERS, tailors, 119
S. University. Remodel clothes for
men and women. Relining, reweav-
ing. Also make hand-made button
holes.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 50 acres, good for post-
war building. $100 per acre, 5 miles
from Ann Arbor. Good road. Call
evenings and Sunday, 6196.

}

FOR RENT

NICELY FURNISHED two or three
room apt. and room in suburban
Ann Arbor. Phone 9308.
ROOMS FOR RENT at 1208 Oakland,
one single, one double on insulated
third floor. Shower. Students pre-
ferred. Phone 3197.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Single strand pearls, chine
stone clasp, Thursday, between
Mosher and campustown. Reward.
Mary Lou Gork. 2-45616.
LOST: Identification bracelet. Sil-
ver engraved, Connie-Charlie. Re-

1'

i

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---- ------- ------- - --------
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(Continued from Page 1)

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This vastly expanded education
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If we are to win the peace, we
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4 MONTH INTENSIVE
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