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March 31, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, AJARCII 31, 11945.

THE MICHIGAN, DAILY.

. i.

Swimmers

Hold

econd

Place

in

-NCAAi

Haegg Makes
Farewell Run,
Aims for First Win
Over Jim Rafferty
BUFFALO, N. Y., March 30-(PA)-
Gunder Haegg, the Speedy Swede, is
scheduled to make his farewell ap-
pearance of his 1945 American Track
Tour in Buffalo tomorrow night, but
sponsoring officials were wondering
whether "Gunder the Wonder" would
make it.
Haegg has been visiting his fiancee,
Miss Dorothy Nortier, on the West
Coast, in Oakland, Calif., and finally
got a seat on an airliner late today.
He was "bumped" from passen-
ger lists Wednesday and yesterday
by persons with higher priority.
Officials of the Niagara Association
AAU and the 74th Regiment Arm-
ory A. A. agree that Gunder will
certainly have to be swift to arrive
in time for the Invitational Mile
scheduled for 10 p. m. (EWT). He
is expected to arrive here late tomor-
row afternoon.
Jimmy Rafferty of the New York
Athletic Club, thrice Gunder's con-
queror will attempt to lower the
4 :12 74th Armory Mile mark set
by Paavo Nurmi in 1920.
Haegg's best time in his four Am-
erican appearances was recorded in
Chicago when he was clocked in
4:14.5. Rafferty's fastest time this
se.son is 4:13.1.
Shorts, '01 Football
Team Captain Dies*
Bruce C. Shorts, captain of the
1901 football team, died Thursday in
Seattle, Washington.
Shorts, who was graduated from
the law school in 1901, played tackle
on Coach Fielding H. Yost's first
University football team which de-
feated Stanford in the first annual
Rose Bowl game. He was a former
football coach at the Universities of
Oregon and Nevada.

O'Hara Leads Golfers
In Fourth Crown Quest
Last Year's Letter Winner Elected Captain;
Formerly Held Detroit Prep Championship
By RUTH ELCONIN
Leading the Wolverine golf team during the 1945 season will be Captain
Paul O'Hara, who hopes to spark the Michigan linksters on to their fourth
consecutive Big Ten Championship.
O'Hara earned his varsity golf letter last year when he was a member
of the Maize and Blue squad that captured the Conference crown, and his
long drives and accurate putting seemed to come when a victorious match
was needed most by the linksters,
Michigan's golf captain entered the

Coach Doherty
Holds His Own,
As Cinder Ace
Track Mentor Starred
At Detroit's Wayne U.,
Placed i Olympics
By BILL MULLENDORE .
Cynics among sports fans are in-
clined to ask of even the most suc-
cssful coaches, "Sure, he does all'
right telling others how to do it, but
could he do it himself?"
In the case of Ken Doherty, Mich-
igan's track coach, the cynic might
I be more thai a little surprised at the
answer to such an inquiry, for Doh-
erty, in addition to being a coach of
champions, is a champion of the cin-
derpath in his own right.
The Wolverine mentor established
his" track reputation in perhaps the,
most exacting of all competition-
the decathlon-a 10-event program
requiring a high degree of skill in
almost every phase of track and field
endeavor. It is definitely not the
place for the specialist, who excells
in only one event.
Although he got off to a rather
cl~x cft t bi failinp to win atrack

Ohio State Garners 30
Points To Pace Rivals
Mert Church Wins 50-Yard Freestyle by
Beating Gene Rogers, Ace Columbia Star
(Continued from Page 1)
Hero of the evening was Wolverine stalwart, Chuck Fries, who swam
the anchor leg of the 300-yard medley relay. This battle, jam-packed with
thrills, was taken by the Maize and Blue in 3:05.4.
Fries started out a length and a half behind the leader, Joseph DiStasio
of Cornell, and, making up this distance in the first three laps, surged
ahead of the Big Red charge in the final lap, to capture victory by a full
three feet.
Heini Kessler handled the breastsroke leg of the relay admirably,
against Vern Ojampa of Minnesota and Cornell's ace, Paul Murray. Maize
and Blue veteran, Gordon Pulford swam the backstroke heat.
Princeton's 18-year-old hopeful,- -

,i

ONE TO GO:
Get Final Berth
ByWin Sunday
DETROIT, March 30-(P)-The
Detroit Red Wings, preparing for
their trip to Boston andgame No. 6
Sunday night in the first round of
the Stanley Cup Playoffs, today were
acclaiming the Veteran Modere
(Mud) Bruneteau, the top money
player in Detroit's Stanley Cup com-
petition.
It was Bruneteau who whipped
in a goal at 17:12 of the sudden-
death overtime 'period Thursday
night to beat the Bruins, 3 to 2,
and give the Red Wings a 3 to 2
edge in games over Boston.
Bruneteau, who has been playing
with a fractured upper jaw, received
in the final game of the regular
season, also rifled in the winning goal
from a difficult angle in the last five
minutes of Sunday's game.
The Red Wings were confident
of concluding the semifinals Sun-
day night. They need one more'
victory to reach the finals.
On the other hand, Boston's play-'
ing coach, Aubrey (Dit) Clapper, as-
serts, "we're not conceding anything
yet."
"We weren't outplayed much, if
any. We could have won."
A Boston victory Sunday would
return the teams to Detroit Tuesday
night for seventh game, which may
or may not decide the semi-finals
since a deadlock is possible.
Practice Game

University of Michigan in September
1942, and he dropped his civilian sta-
tus the following July when he donned
a sailor uniform as a member of the
V-12 program. Besides being on the
golf team, O'Hara is also a member
of Triangle, Vulcans; and is on the
Senior Committee in the Engineering
College.
Golf Games Easy
Golf comes as a second nature to
Paul because he has been active in
the sport since he was five years old.
His early interest was aroused be-
cause his father and two older broth=
ers were able golfers, and the idea of
family competition lured him on
until he finally became the family's
number one player.
While attending University of De-I
troit High School, O'Hara not only
was a varsity linkster but also played
on the basketball team; earning three
major letters in each sport. In his
senior year he captained the golf
squad, winning the Detroit City golf
title for the third successive year and
he took the individual crown for the

James Shand, copped the 150-yard
backstroke crown handily in 1:41.8.
Second in this event was Bob White
of Indiana. The real excitement was
afforded by the battle for third place
between Wolverine Russell Potter,
OSU's Bob Dennis, and Don Iseman,
Cornell entrant.
Potter, a new addition to the Maize
and Blue starting lineup, held down
last place until the final lap, when he
let go with a burst of speed to over-
!'3ums' Gone,
R!ciseyGrooms
Neu Dodgers

sow start y iazn guWI LU
letter at Detroit's Western High,
Doherty came into his own as a
cinder star at the City College ofj
Detroit, now Wayne University,
where he competed successfully in
the shot put, javelin, high jump,
broad jump, high and low hurdles,
and pole vault. It is said that he
also carried water between events,
just to keep busy.
After coming to Michigan to pre-

I
}
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E
i

second consecutive time that same pare for a teaching career, Doherty
season. began to train for the 1928 Olym-
Likes Tournament Play pies, placing third in the Decathlon}
O'Hara believes that tournament at Amsterdam with 7,600 points, nine
play is an asset to a golfer because j short of the existing world's record.
not only does he gain excellent ex- In 1929, he followed up the Olym-
perience but it is also a good test pic performance with 7,784-point tal-
ivtose ane na nsri Ii.,u

Ending Today
"LAKE PLACID
SRENADE"1
Also
NEW NOSTRADAMUS
LIL' ABNER CARTOON
FLICKER FLASHBACKS
PARAMOUNT NEWS
Last Days of Manila
Sunday
"SONG TO REMEMBER"'

of a player's skill. In 1941, he team-
ed with Al Watrous Jr., whose father
is a noted golfer and who has done
much to aid Paul's style, to win the
Meadowbrook Invitational title. The
next year he and Watrous Jr. reached
the final round in the Grosse Ile tour-
nament.
Commenting on the chances of the
1945 linksters, Michigan's golf cap-
tain believes that there is a strong
indication of winning the Big Ten
crown for the fourth straight year.
O'Hara says that with "veterans John
Jenswold, Phil Mar cellus, and John
Tews on the team, and a fine coach
like Bill Barclay, the Wolverine golf-
ers should have a very successful
season.
Give To The
Red Cross

Through with record-breaking,
Doherty settled down to coaching,
and, if anything, has been even
more successful in that capacity.
He began his career at Southeast-
ern High in Detroit, doubling back
as a mathematics teacher. In 1929,
the same. year that he broke the
N. A. A. U. record, fortune smiled
on him again when he was tend-
ered the job of assistant track
coach at Princeton University.
The following year found him at
Michigan, also in the capacity of as-
sistant track coach. When head coach
Charlie Hoyt moved on to Yale in
1940, Doherty moved into the driver's
seat at Michigan, and has been there
ever since.
In those six years, Doherty has
compiled a coaching record which
most coaches only dream about.

ay to set a ner National A. A. U.
Decathlon record.

Whit Wyatt Sale Hints
Desire for Youngsters
NEW YORK, March 30.-(P)--The
Brooklyn Dodger score cards this
year should carry a notation to the
effect that any resemblance to the
Bums of other years is strictly coin-
cidental, and Mr. Rickey will take
care of such a situation in due time.
Branch Rickey and Uncle Sam
have been doing a strip tease with
the Brooklyn roster, until today it
bears but a hazy resemblance to
what it was in the glory days when
the Borough of Brooklyn was just
one big baseball park as far as en-
thusiasm was concerned.
Now Whitlow Wyatt has joined the
list of Camillis and Medwick and
Vaughans and Hermans and Reisers
as gone but not forgotten heroes.
Wyatt has been sold down the river
to the Phillies, a fate that at one
time would have been considered
worse than baseball death, although
this year it could even be a break.
WI o know, the Pxiiilies night win
the pennant.
Sale Indicates Policy
Anyway, the sale of Wyatt either
indicates that Rickey is convinced
the 36-year-old pitcher is through, or
that he's getting rid of him under
his policy of youth, which he carried'
to something of an extreme last year.
Wyatt was of little help except to
opposing teams last year, and if he
came back with a sound arm this
year it would be something of a
miracle.
The decline of Wyatt from a high-
ly-paid star of 1941 and 1942 to his
present status of a property of little
assessed value again demonstrates
the fragile and fleeting qualities of a
pro baseball career.
Hold-Out Four Years Ago
Just four years ago he was a major
factor in the Dodgers' march to the
pennant, and he was as independent
as a mouse in a cheese factory when
it came to talking 1942 contract. He
held out until March 22, 1942, and
signed for a reported $17,500.
The departure of the Georgian
leaves just four active players on the
11941 championship club still on the
roster. They are Dixie Walker, Mick-
ey Owen, Curt Davis and Augie Ga-
Ilan. Of these only Davis has report-
ed.

take both Dennis and Iseman, thus
snagging the third place berth.
The closest finish of the evening
was seen in the 220-yard freestyle
encounter. Columbia's contestant,
Rogers, and Schlanger, Ohio State's
freshman, were within a hairs-
breadth of each other throughout the
whole race. Rogers just managed to
nose ahead of the Buckeye to win by
a finger-tip.
The five remaining events of the
championships will be run-off at 8:00
p. m. tomorrow night at the Varsity
Pool. They are the 100-yard free-
style, 200-yard breaststroke, 440-yard
freestyle, 400-yard freestyle relay, and
diving competition from the three-
meter board.
Summaries
50-Yard Free Style - Won by
CHURCH, (MICHIGAN), Second
Rogers (Columbia); Third PULFORD
(MICHIGAN); Fourth Grode (Ohio
State); Fifth FRIES (MICHIGAN).
Time :23.3.
150-Yard Back Stroke-Won by
! Shand (Princeton); Second White
(Indiana); Third POTTER (MICH-
IGAN); Fourth Dennis (Ohio State);
Fifth Iseman (Cornell). Time 1:41.8.
220 Yard Free Style-Won by Rog-
ers (Columbia); Second Schlanger
(Ohio State); Third Maloney (Can-
isius); Fourth Riehl (Cornell); Fifth,
Mercer (Michigan State). Time
2:14.6.
Low Board Diving, won by Billings-
ley (Ohio State) 853.4; Second, Chri-
stakos (Ohio State) 819.2, Third
Ruotsalainen (Minnesota) 761.9;
Fourth, Stone (Ohio State) 738;
Fifth, Barber (Michigan State)
518.3.
300-Yard Medley Relay, won by
M9CIHGAN (PULFORD, KESSLER,
FRIES) ; Second, Cornell, Third,
Minnesota, Fourth Ohio State, Fifth,
Michigan State. Time 3:05.4.
1500 Meter Free Style, won by
Schlanger, OSU, Second, Hausne,
Northwestern; Third, Byers, Purdue;
Fourth, Maloney, Canisius; Fifth,
Halldorson, Iowa. Tinie 20:11.4.
EASTER GREETINGS
Let us help you look your
best this Eastertide.
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State & Mich. Theatres
Last Dy
ABBOTT & COSTELLO
"Here Come The Co-eds"
WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Starts Sunday
ITSA A_

4

EVANSVILLE, Ind., March 30-P)
-Manager Steve O'Neill named the
following lineups for Saturday's squad
game.
Regulars-Webb, SS; Mayo, 2B;
Outlaw, RF; York, 1B; Cramer, CF;
Maier, LF; Hoover, 3B; Richhrds, C;
Benton and Ruthstrom, P.
Yannigans-McNabb, 2B; Borom,
SS; Hostetler, CF; Walker, RF; Mc-
Hale, LF; Ross, 3B; Mierkowscz, 1B;
Swift, C; Overmire and Eaton, P.
Wet grounds kept the Tigers off the
diamond again today but they limber-
ed up their arms by throwing the ball
around a gravel parking area back
of the stadium.

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

HELP WANTED
WANTED: Student for part time
drawing work, preferably a few
hours each afternoon. Call Hen-
derson. Phone 2-3136.

THE ART CINEMA LEAGUE PRESENTS
"lSI

JEAN GABIN

* ERIC VON STROHEIM

.nglish Subtitles
Proclairned B"Bcs lFii of the Year" by National Board of Thevew
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

FEMALE HELP WANTED: Women
or girls for lunch counter and soda,
fountain. If you are in need of
part time, evening, or week end
employment, contact Mr. B. John-
son at 226 S. Main St.
FOR RENT__
NICELY "FURNISHED 4-ROOM
apartment in suburban Ann Ar-
bor. Also rooms, with or without
cooking privilege, and private bath.
Phone 9308.
ROOMS FOR RENT at 1208 Oakland,

March 29, 30, 31
Admission 42c (tax included)

8:30 P.M.
All Seats Reserved

one single, one double on insulated
third floor. Shower. Students pre-
ferred. Phone 3197.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Women's riding boots,
size 7, excellent condition, $10.00.
Call 2-4836.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Van Roy pipe and tobacco4
pouch between E. University and
West Quad. Call Michigan Daily.
2-3241.
LOST: Identification bracelet. En-
graved Ralph D. Dwyer 38496971.
Call East Quad Co. A. Reward.
LOST: Navy blue leather wallet with
zipper on 2 sides. Contained check
and about $8. Call Lois Calvin
2-1288. Reward.
LOST-Blue leather purse between
S. W. and U. H. S. Thursday. Con-
tents urgent. Reward. Helen
Huntington. 24561.
LOST: Brown wallet. Contains snap-
shots, personal papers, identifica-
Lion. Call Dot Upham, 2-3225.
WANTED
ROOMATE WANTED to share com-
fortable three room apt. with
woman. East of University, con-
venient. Call 2-6467.

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Let's raid the icebox

. ,Have a Coca-Cola,

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AT THE
RADIO& RECORD SHOP
715 N. UNIVERSITY

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