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November 12, 1943 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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'Ii MICHIGAN DAiILY

"3 ~ r rn

Spirit High in

W"overine Camp on

Eve of Wisconsin

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PRE-SEASON BASKETBALL:

Cagers Show Improvement;
Three Teams Continue Practice

I.
4-

By DAVE LOEWENBERG

Yesterday afternoon found the
.,Wolverine basketball team engaged
in-their hardest workout of the year.
.Assistant Coach Bill Barclay divided
the squad into three teams, team
number one using a slow breaking
style of offense, team number two
exhibiting the Indiana style of play,
and team number three was a fresh-
man unit playing together for the
first time.
The first scrimmage of the day
pitted team number one against team
number three. The first team found
Wayne Thompson and Dave Strack
at the forwards, John Leddy anddDick
Shrider at the guard posts and big
Tom Paton at center. Team three,
an all freshman squad, listed Bob
Caspari, Ed Clauss, Bob Fuller, Her-
man Frehse and Stan Peterson as
its performers.
Game Was Rout
This game turned out to be quite
arout with team one rolling up an
18-2 triumph in a ten minute scrim-
mage. Dave Strack was high point
man with 8 points and the only
freshman to score was Stan Peter-
son.
r The.second scrimmage pitted team
too cmposed of Herm Heunessey,

Max Kelly, Tom King and Robert
Stevens against the freshman squad.
This time the contest was much
closer, but team two had a little too
much polish for the yearlings and
won 18-10. High point man in the
scrimmage was Bob Fuller who chalk-
ed up 8 points while Tom King
led the victors attack with 6 points.
Final Scrimmage
The final scrimmage of the eve-
ning pitted team one against team
two and this was by far the best
game of the evening. It was especi-
ally interesting' to watch these two
teams play, for both squads exhibited
an entirelydifferent style of attack.
The first team, using a slow break,
pounded out a 25-18 win over the
second squad which specialized in a
fireball type of play. Dave Strack was
again top scorer, getting 12 points
while Bob Stevens led the losers
with 8 points.
The dividing of the squad into
three teams was not necessarily done
on a basis of merit. Instead, the
main emphasis was (1) on giving
the freshmen a chance to work to-
gether as a unit and (2) in pitting
a slow breaking team against a fast
breaking team in an effort to com-
pare the effectiveness of both styles
of play.

Hockey Team's
Hopes Rise as
Four Return
By JO ANN PETERSON
With the Coliseum opening Satur-
day night, Coach Eddie Lowrey is
losing no time in getting his hockey
prospects together in the first prac-
tice drill which will be Tuesday af-
ternoon.
Returning from last year's squad
will be Gordon Anderson and Jack
Athens, wings, both of whom played
a lot of hockey for Lowrey last sea-
son, Bob Derleth, captain, and sixty-
minute defenseman, and Ted Greer,
who was outstanding on the yearling
squad.
Although Lowrey has not issued
any call for hockey players, he has
had calls from boys, both civilians
and servicemen stationed here, which
indicates that there will not be a
shortage of material.
Several Experienced Men
Several of the men who have called
Lowrey have had previous experience
playing hockey, either on collegiate
teams or in high school leagues. He
estimates that he has had calls from
at least a dozen men who profess to
have had experience at the puck
game.,
An overabundance of material will
be a change for the harassed Lowrey,
who has had a shortage of hockey
candidates for several seasons. Last
year in particular he was in a tight
spot, when graduation and the Army
combined to reduce his team to a
mere handful of men at the begin-
ning of the second semester.
Defensemen Fill In
With Bob Derleth and Bob Sten-
berg, Mutt and Jeff of the team,
coached to fill in the two defense
jobs, however, Lowrey managed to
close the gap in his back-line. Al-
though both boys were inexperienced,
they picked up the rudiments of the
game rapidly, and became invaluable
to Lowrey for the second half of the
season.

Acting CaptainSaturday

"4+

Football Steals Spotlight from.
Basketball in Indiana This Year

INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. 11.- (p)-
Ki1g" basketball is toppling on his
throne in this Hoosier hotbed of the
hardwood sport as the 1943 football
sason roars to a close with Indiana
possessing the one-two teams of the
nation, the country's leading scorer,
two other undefeated elevens and
one of.the year's best all-civilian
teams.
Ordinarily;'just the mere mention
ofbisketball brings a string of facts
and figures to prove the best quintets
* f all come from-Indiana.
Hoosiers now 'have another set of
.- facts and figures to prove the best
tma of all come from-Indiana-.
but this time it's football instead of.
basketba f 11 '
S erNotre Dame and Purdue are unde-"
feated and untied and rated first and
second, respectively, among the 1943
gridiron teams.
2. Bob Steuber, late of Missouri
and the Chicago. Bears and now of
De Pauw University (Greencastle,
Ind.), has' scored 129 points in five
games to take a firm grip on first
place in the race for the nation's in-
dividual scoring championship- a
title held last year by another Hoo-
sier player, Eddie McGovern, then of
Rose Poly and now of Illinois.
3. Bunker Hill (Ind.) Naval Air
Station, starring Mal Kutner, for-
mer University of Texas star, is un-
defeated and untied.
4. De Pauw is unbeaten in six
games but has been tied once-be-
fore Steuber arrived on the scene.
5. Indiana University, depending
entirely on civilians, has lost only to
service-bolstered Northwestern and
Michigan.
Notre Dame,; Purdue and Indiana
-the "'big three" of the Hoosier
state-have a combined record of 19
victories and only 2 defeats and 2
ties against the best the middle west,
south and east have to offer.
If Notre Dame can whip North-
western, the Iowa Seahawks and
Great Lakes, about the only national
championship arguments Hoosiers
could get would be from other Hoo-
siers who favor Purdue. The Boiler-
makers need only to beat Indiana' to
get at least a share of the Big Ten
championship.
All-American candidates? They're
a dime a dozen in Indiana this year
-Angelo* Bertelli, Creighton Miller,

and practically the whole Notre
Dame line; Tony Butkovich, Mike
Kasap, Alex Agase, Dick Barwegen
and Boris Dimancheff of Purdue, Bob
Hoernschemeyer, of Indiana; Bob
Steuber of De Pauw, et cetera..
King basketball isn't dead yet in
Indiana but he's certainly breathing
hard.

RUDY SMEJA
. ..pass catcher extraordinary,
and one of two civilians on the
Wolverine squad, who will be ex-
pected to continue his fine play
against Wisconsin's Badgers Sat-
urday.
Army, 7Navy
Cornmence
I-M Program
The Army and the Navy will in-
augurate their intramural program
tonight at Waterman gym.
Starting at 7 o'clock, the Navy pro-
gram will run until 8:40 and the
Army will conduct its program from
8:45 until 10:30 every Friday. Bas-
ketball will be the chief team sport
played while the individual sports
will consist of boxing, wrestling, track
events and gymnastics.
Basketball leagues have been form-
ed by both the Army and the Navy
of approximately 16 teams apiece. A
team is : made up of about 19 men'
which will 'be cut down to aten after
a two weeks practice period. The in-
dividual teams 'represent" the differ-
ent battalotit n eom-piaies in the
intra-squad i to mpetit on~r fAfter the
winners'of'the Navy and:A-rmy squad
competition!,have:-been.determined,
these two teams will play against
each other for the servicemens'
championship.
Tournaments will be held in 'box-
ing, wrestling, track events, and gym-
nastics to determine the champions
in each field.
All men are eligible except those
who are playing on current Varsit3
teams such as basketball, football
and hockey, and those scholastically
ineligible.

Badger Plays
Stressed as
Game Nears
By BO BOWMAN
"Beat the Badgers," was the cry
that rang through the Wolverine
camp as the Varsity began tapering
off for its tilt with Wisconsin on
Saturday.
Yesterday Michigan was given a
thorough knowledge of the Wiscon-i
sin offense as the reserves ran1
through Wisconsin plays in a mock
scrimmage. Passing also received
some attention with Jack Wink on
the throwing end. This offensive
weapon probably will be Michigan's
second line of attack and will be
used only as needed.
It has been said that Coach Harry
Stuhldreher of Wisconsin may be
able to pull a surprise or two on
Michigan this week as he is supposed
to know his old players backwards
and forwards. Mr. Stuhldreher may<
be in for a surprise because his boys
now pack a lot more dynamite than
they did a year ago. Then too the
knowledge of the other fellow works
two ways as evidenced by Bob Hanz-
lik in Thursday's workout. Bob ably
assisted Line Coach Biggie Munn in
showing the other linemen how the
Wisconsin forwards blocked and op-
ened holes in their opponents' line.
The big question of overconfidence
has definitely been absent this week
among Coach Crisler's men. The ex-
Wisconsin players in particular have
been looking forward all year to Sat-
urday's battle against their old coach
and teammates. As an example, ap-
propriate placards were placed in the
dressing room during the week by
the players to help keep Saturday's
game foremost in their minds.
The injuries suffered by Rudy
Smeja, George Kraeger, and Fred
Negus last week have responded to
treatment and all will be ready for
the game on Saturday. Elroy Hirsch's
arm is still in bad shape and the
former Badger will probably not see
action against his former teammates.
NU Ready for Irish
EVANSTON, Ill., Nov. 11.-()-
Irjnn Waldorf put a high polish on
Northwestern's defense and offense
today and declared, 'We're as ready
as we can ever be for Notre Dame."
The passing and running of Otto
Graham featured the offensive drill,
while Herb Mein and Bob Wallis{
stood out in defensive practices
which stressed maneuvers against
t passes.

LOWdown on Sports
*byI[UD LOW
Out-of-Bounds Kickoffs
SO FAR this season Michigan's gridiron opponents have done one thing in
particular that has caused us to wonder-deliberately kicking the ball
out of bounds on the kickoff. Now there are arguments on both sides as to
whether this is beneficikl or harmful to the game, but we are of the opinion
that it is definitely detrimental from the spectators' point of view, and that
if it is continually practiced it will be as harmful as it would be to abolish
the point after touchdown.
Of course the rulebook says kicking out of bounds on the kickoff is
perfectly legal, and in some instances it is good football strategy to do
so, but it eliminates one of those thrilling incidents that all sports fol-
lowers crave to see. Collegians put the ball in play on the 35-yard line
when the pigskin goes out of bounds on the kickoff, but the profession-
als, realizing the value of a spectacular return, penalize the team kick-
ing off a good deal more by bringing the ball in at the 45-yard stripe.
Michigan has always been noted for its broken field runners and has
always had good blocking in the open, and therefore the Wolverines have
been the victim of out-of-bounds kickoffs a large percentage of the time.
This year Maize and Blue opponents have feared the open field running of
Elroy Hirsch, Bill Daley, Captain Paul White, and Bob Nussbaumer even
more than usual as shown by the fact that Northwestern, Notre Dame,
Minnesota, and Indiana continually kicked off out of bounds.
Western Conference statistics, which included games played Nov. 6,
showed that the Maize and Blue gridders were last in the "kick returns"
column, while in practically every other department they were first or
second. This seems to indicate that, despite the fact that the Wolverines
were last in the number of yards gained from returned kicks (mainlay
because opponents refused to kickoff in bounds), it did not seem to do
them any particular harm in their four Big Ten games to date
LOOKING BACK in the records we found that the last time Michigan
scored on the kickoff was Sept. 28, 1940, when Tom Harmon took the
ball on the five-yard marker and raced 95 yards to a touchdown against
California's Golden Bears. Now we are aware of the fact that most opposing
coaches realize that even the Wolverines', chances of running back the kick-
off for a score are mighty slim, but these coaches seem to think that Maize
and Blue runners will get beyond the 35-yard line at least half the time, else
they would not instruct their players to kick off out of bounds.
We are of the opinion that even the best downfield blocking team
with the best broken field runners will not be able to get as far or be-
yond the 35-yard stripe on the average, and that only under certain
highly extraordinary conditions is it a wise policy to kick off out of
bounds. One possible condition that might occur is when a team, after
playing a scoreless tie throughout the game, pushes over a touchdown
with but a few minutes left.to play, and in order to protect their slim
margin, kick 'off' out of ,bounds.
All of which leads us to believe that collegiate rules should be changed
so that the ball will be put in play on the 45-yard line when it goes outside
the playing field on the kickoff. This, we believe, would speed up the game,
make it more interesting for the spectators, and certainly would not make
it any less enjoyable for the players.

Traditional Michigan Football
Bust To Be Held in Detroit Nov.27

DETROIT, Nov. 11. -( P)-- The
famous Little Brown Jug, the trophy
the Wolverines took from Minnesota
this year after nine long years, will
adorn the 'speakers' table at the tra-
ditional Michigan football bust Sat-
urday, Nov. 27, at the Hotel Statler.
Lt.-Comm. Harry G. Kipke, former
Michigan All-American halfback and
coach, will be master of ceremonies.
Speakers will include Capt. Rich-
ard E. Cassidy, United States Navy
and Commandant of the NROTC at
Michigan, and other Army, Navy and
Marine Corps officers from the cam-

pus, W. B. Crawford,
chairman, announced.

committeeI

Plans are also being made for two
of, Michigan's gridiron heroes, Tom
Kuzma and Julius Franks, to hear
part of the celebration over the tele-
phone in , their room at University
Hospital, Ann Arbor.
The usual custom of presenting
rings to members of the Michigan
squad will also be followed.
The event is sponsored by the Uni-
versity of Michigan Club of Detroit.
I NV EST I N V I CTORY

.
e
'
I

HITS THE MARK FOR 20 MILLION READERS

~

Daily Grid Experts Pick the Winners

Mich.-Wisconsin
Notre Dame-N.W.
Great Lakes-Ind..
O.S.U.-Illinois
Minn.-Iowa
Iowa Cadets-C. Grant
Iowa State-Drake
Dartmouth-Cornell
Navy-Columbia.
Princeton-Yale
Penn-N. Carolina
Penn State-Temple
Cal.-U.C.L.A.
Okla.-Missouri
Texas-T.C.U.
Ark.-S.Methodist
Texas A.&M.-Rice
Georgia Tech.-Tulane
Bucknell-Case
Ga. ,Pre-Flight-Clemson

Fred Delano
Pet. .750
Mich.
N.D. *
G. Lakes
O.S.U.
Minn.
Cadets
Iowa St.
Cornell
Navy
Yale
Penn
Penn St.
Cal.
Missouri
Texas
S.M.U.
Tex. A&M
Tech.
Bucknell
Pre-Flight

M. Ford
Pe. .750
Mich.
N.D.
G. Lakes
O.S.U.
Minn.
Cadets
Iowa St.
Dart.
Navy
Yale
Penn
Penn St.
Cal.
Missouri
Texas
Ark.
Tex. A&M
Tech.
Bucknell
Pre-Flight

H. Frank
Pct. .700
Mich.
N.D.
G. Lakes
O.S.U.
Minn.
Cadets
Iowa St.
Dart.
Navy
Yale
Penn
Penn St.
Cal.
Missouri
Texas
S.M.U.
Tex. A&M
Tech.
Bucknell
Pre-Flight

Bud Low
Pct. .700
Mich.
N.D.
G. Lakes
O.S.U.
Minn.
Cadets
Iowa St.
Dart.
Navy
Yale
Penn
Penn St.
Cal.
Missouri
Texas
S.M.U.
Tex. A&M
Tech.
Bucknell
Pre-Flight

E. Zaleriski
Pct. .550
Mich.
N.D.
G. Lakes
O.S.U.
Minn.
Cadets
Iowa St.
Dart.
Navy
Yale
Penn
Penn St.
U.C.L.A.
Missouri
Texas
Ark.
Tex. A&M
Tech.
Bucknell
Pre-Flight

Consensus
Mich.
N.D.
G. Lakes
O.S.U.
Minn.
Cadets
Iowa St.
Dart.
Navy
Yale
Penn
Penn St.
Cal.
Missouri
Texas
S.M.U.
Tex. A&M
Tech.
Bucknell
Pre-Flight

?. ham..
4 0
Moo
f." f
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fr,}. f f r f $f Yjr

C.iIte

Red Wings, Leaf
-. TORONTO, Nov. 11.-(A)-A pic-
ture goal by the veteran Lorne Carr
in the dying seconds tonight gave the
Toronto Maple Leafs a 2-2 tie with
the Detroit Red Wings. It was the
second tie game of , the National
-°Hockey League season between the
'E two teams.
'e: Carr's goal climaxed an up-hill
struggle by the Leafs after Detroit
went into an early lead with two
quick goals in the opening period-

fs Deadlock, 2-2
one by Modere ("Mud") Bruneteau
and the other by Adam Brown. Bru-
neteau's goal-his eighth of the sea-
son-was unassisted. Blond Bill
Quackenbush assisted on Brown's.
Don Webster, who signed a Tor-
l onto contract this week and was
playing his first game of N.H.L.
hockey, put the Leafs back into the
hunt with a second period goal on
which he was assisted by- sturdy El-
win Morris and peppery Jack Hamil-
ton.

71

WASHINGTON

By
Drew Pearson

W4ERRYiO*ROUIND

a
i

I .t

ii

Twenty million people read what Drew Pearson reveals in his
column of special report, interpretation and comment upon
national and international affairs and the men who mold them,
Because those twenty million find in the column alert, exclusive-
news-getting, crisp and to-the-point news-writing, disclosures of
beneath-the-surface motives and movements-able and unswayed

OPEN for DANCING

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