100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 07, 1943 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOV. 7, 1943

-- i

U' Students
Vill Survey
ViIlow Run
Prof. Carr's Classes
To Participate in Study
Of Social Adjustment
Students of Prof. L. J. Carr's 9 and
o'clock sociology classes will take
,rt in the Willow Run Study Pro-
ct, interviewing workers in their
me settings near Ypsilanti, accord-
g to Mr. James Stermer, director.
This project, he said, "is a study of
e adjustment cycle in a period of
cial transition, or a problem in
cial change. The impact of this
ange can be found in the fact that
e social and academic maladjust::
mts studied in students who have
ed in this area for a short time are
mparable with social and academic
aladjustments typical of industrial
mmunities which have existed for
'e or six years."
In the spot picked out for the study
nich is one square mile in area,
ree miles east of Ypsilanti, there
re 72 dwellings in 1939, 450 in Oc-
ber 1942, and 629 in May, 1943. In
dition to these independent dwell-
gs consisting of tents, trailers, base-
ents and shacks, there are govern-
mt built homes.
Fifty percent of the population isI
3m Michigan, while the remainder
present 36 states and 20 foreign
untries.

Lutherans Move into New Student CenterI

* *

ontinuing,
ere are now
ses to make
social and

Mr. Stermer said,
enough government
possible a study in
cultural differences

Mr. James Stermer, director of
he Willow Run Study Project, is
ery eager to have students who
ave worked in the bomber plant
iscuss their experiences with him.
Students who are willing to do
his will contribute valuable in-
ormation to this sociology project.
4r. Stermer can be reached at
027 E. Huron. Telephone 7611.

For the first time in its history, O
Gamma Delta, an organization of
Missouri- Lutheran students, will
have its own center (above) for
religious and social activities at
1511 Washtenaw.
Recently purchased by the Mich-
igan District of this church body,
the center will be called the Uii-
versity Lutheran Chapel. The house
will contain a chapel, a service-
men's center, a social center for
students, living quarters for the
pastor and his wife, office rooms,
Student Begins
College Career
Via Mailman
Students can go to college via the
mails, as Frances Mayse, an invalid
Detroit girl, has discovered.
Frances has enrolled in two Uni-
versity Extension Service correspon-
dence courses, first year college Eng-
lish and Spanish, as the first step
toward her college degree. She can
complete her entire freshman year
by this means but does not yet know
how she will finish her college pro-
gram.
Paralyzed and confined to a wheel
chair as a result of a driving accident
five years ago when she broke her
neck, Frances continued her educa-
tion with the help of visiting teach-
ers and was graduated last June from
Northwestern High School.
Another correspondent student is
70-year-old Mrs. Mary C. Lewis of
Detroit, who wrote to the Correspon-
dence Study Department that the
study required by the course has
kept her from worrying about the
war. Mrs. Lewis has been bedridden
for several years.

and a kitchen for student suppers.
The 17-room house, formerly
used as the Alice Palmer coopera-
tive, will be completely renovated
within the next few weeks, the Rev.
Alfred Schieps said yesterday. The
first floor has been completed and
is now being used for student ac-
tivities. Services will be held at
11 a.m. today, and at 5:30 p.m. the
students will meet for supper and
a social hour.
The Rev. Schieps, who began his
work last fall on campus, was the
first full-time University pastor to
serve students of the Evangelical
Lutheran Church of the Missouri
Synod. Prior to his service at Mich-
igan, the Rev. Schieps was pastor
of Calvary Church at Lincoln, Neb.,
for three years. He was graduated
from Concordia Theological Sem-
inary at St. Louis in 1937 and in
1940 he received his master of arts
degree from the University of Ne-
braska.
Indians Take
Warpath Again
Prove Selves in Battle
Against Japs, Germans
WASHINGTON, Nov. 6.-(P)-
Where is the "vanishing American"
now? He's up there relentlessly stalk-
ing the "mustache smeller"-his
name for Hitler-and using the b .y-
onet on Japanese. -
The 400;000 American Indians,
liith their 'superb, tireless' !ighting'
,men and their; traditional war ;ervor,
are one of tie most potent mitibrityl
groups assisting in the march toward
victory, the Office of Indian Affairs
said today in a report on war activi-
ties.

iich exist between those who live
the government homes and those
o liverin independent dwellings.
' will study individual case his-
ries of children and families in or-
nizations such as the school, union,
urch and recreational groups."
The conditions of sanitation and
iooling are poor. Those living in
vernmet homes have proper sani-
ion, bpt most of those living in in-
pendeirt dwellings have not had
eir wells tested, since the area does
t come under the jurisdiction.of
y city.
Students taking part in the project
1 take around questionnaires. They
1 be driven out in University trucks
3 p.m. each day from Nov. 9 to
v. 18 and will return at 6 p.m.

Kournakoff
To Lecture
Veteran To Discuss
Red Army Strategy
Capt. Sergei N. Kournakoff, who
fought in the Russian Imperial Ar-
my as a cavalry subaltern in the first
World War and who fought against
the Red Army for almost three years
will speak at 8 p.m. Saturday in the
Rackham Auditorium. His topic will
be "The Red Army and Its Strategy."
Capt. Kournakoff paid with defeat
and exile for a knowledge of the
fighting qualities of the Soviets. At
the time of the Civil War he knew
only that his side was losing. He
fought the Red Army from the Do-
netz Basin to the arid sands of Cen-
tral Asia, near the Afghan border.
After the war he made it his busi-
ness to understand why his side had
lost the war. He studied the Red
Army, following its battles, reading
its books, its newspapers and learn-
ing about its developments day by
day for almost twenty years.
He is the author of "Savage Squad-
rons" and "Russia's Fighting Forces."
He has written both technical and
popular articles on the Russian forc-
es.
Capt. Kournakoff is speaking un-
der the auspices of the National
Council for American-Soviet Friend-
ship. Prof. John F. Shepard is chair-
man of the Ann Arbor branch. Prof.
Everett S. Brown will introduce the
speaker. Tickets for the lecture are
now on sale.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
A kC
CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
Non-Contract.
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of $.25 for each
additional 5 words.)
. tract Rates ,on Requst
F iALE
thiMON your used ..,
S hinag by ing Claude L
Brown. 2-7f 512 S. Main.
ALPHA TAU OMEGA, 1923 Geddes
will serve meals to a limited num-
ber of male students. Best cook in
Ann Arbor! "Where the elite meet
to eat." Those interested call 2-
3125 and ask for Mr. Bek.'
COUNTRY HOME in Ann Arbor
district. 6 room farmhouse in fine
condition, electricity, furnace, 2
car garage, chicken coop, 4 acres.
Lake frontage. Close to school.
Only $7,50. Also good farms for
sale. Oril Ferguson, 928 Forest.
Phone 22839. 6x
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING: thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
BOARD: for girls by week or dinners
at night. Cal 4701. 1513 S. Uni-
versity.

ROOMS
ROOM and board available in co-
operative houses. Girls call per-
sonnel committee at 5974. Boys
call personnel committee at 7211.
HELP WANTED
YOUNG MEN WANTED, part time
or full time work. Collection de-
partment. Dixie Shop Inc. 224 S.
Main. 9686.
WANTED-girl for general office
work on part time basis. Know-
ledge of typing necessary. Call
A.A. 5000.
WAITER, WAITRESS: 9 p.m. on.
Excellent pay. University Grill.
William St., 3rd from State.
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Gold identification bracelet;
Kappa Sigma crest; I. D. I. on re-
verse side. Dale Ingvoldstad, Betsy
Barbour.
INVEST IN VICTORY
THE UNITY
BEHIND THE SCIENCES
PUBLIC LECTURE
by
EDWIN N. LORD, Pres.
Michi gan Theosophical

Starting
Today!

4"

Site Dau8 fSaE ii't
,j, Way fieL0C
1 ~es, sa
HE RE'S THE GRNDEST ROMONTIC FAIR .
' .I, THE SWEETEST Mud4L4 OF THE YEAR !

- ,,..

Foreign Students COEDS ANSWER C A L L!
T 6 B H d US Res ohs

The International Center will hold
a reception in honor of foreign stu-
dents from 8 to 11 p.m. Wednesday at
the Center.
Heading the reception will be Dr.
Esson Gale, director of the Interna-
tional Center; and Mrs. Gale. Others
in the line will be members of the
Board of Governors and other pro-
minent officials.
Invitations have been sent to all
foreign students at the University,
townspeople interested in the Center
and American friends of the foreign
students.
Refreshments will be served.

Terming the response last week
"immense" Mrs. Robert Buron, di-
rector of the community USO Service
Club to be opened soon, announced
yesterday that women may register
again this week from 3 to 5 p.m. to-
morrow. Tuesday and Wednesday.
and from 7 to 9 Wednesday night.
Harris Hall will be open to both
women and servicemen every after-
noon and night, and each girl may
spend as much time at the Club as
she wishes. Members will be required
to sign up for a certain number of
hours each week also.
Because of the large number of wo-

a i

T._

e1

Is 'Ii lme:1se'
men who have registered, Mrs. Bur-
ton said that probably a system of
rotation would be used for all plan-
ned parties and dances. In this way
each member would be able to attend
her share of the parties although she
would not be able to attend them all.
The work of revamping and redec-
orating Harris Hall, headquarters for
the new Club, is being continued, and
as yet no date has been set for the
formal opening.
Each girl in order to qualify for
,membership must present two letters
of recommendation, preferably one
from a clergyman.

Shows Today
1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Adults 40c
Servicemen 25c

1 G wit y i m.be
D ecte b Ir C el r
" by y by
Cartoon: CONCERTO Extra: MARC H OF TIME

PARAMOUNT NEWS

_, .

*&WWITH A
STRONG SILENT MAN!
..*..:
City girl thumbs
ride into the wilds
of romiance... finds
you can lead a man
to the altar...but it s:.
takes a clever girl
to make him link! .

UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION
presents

Aa1

DYNAMIC SPEAKERS
TIM-ELY WORLD TOPICS

Will Rogers J.
Member House of
Representatives
Committee on
Foreign Affairs.

SCHEDULE OF LECTURES
Nov. 18 - WILL ROGE RS, Jr.
"THE UNITED STATES IN
FOREIGN AFFAIRS"
Dec. 1 - FULTON LEWIS, Jr.
"WHAT'S HAPPENING IN
WASHINGTON"
Dec. 13 - BURTON HOLMES
"OUR RUSSIAN ALLIES"
(With Motion Pictures)
Jan. 13 - LOUIS P, LOCHNER
"WHAT ABOUT GERMANY"
Jan. 25 - LELAND STOWE
"WHAT I SAW IN RUSSIA"
Feb. 22- BURTON HOLMES
"NORTH AFRICA"
(With Motion Pictures)
Mar. 8 - Mme. Wellington Koo
"WHAT CHINA IS FIGHTING FOR"
Mar. 23 - BURTON HOLMES
"THE ITALY WE KNOW"
(With Motion Pictures)

Louis P. Lockner
For fourteen
years Chief of
the Berlin Bur-
eau of the Asso-
ciated Press.

- 4r} FRANK ROSS
presents
EAN OHN
"THE MORE T HE MERRIER GJRL"...IN THE
MORE THE MERRIER KIND OF A PICTURE!
C L I N
CHAJIIJS WINNINGER

Leland Stowe
spondent and
Noted war cor -
respondent and
Pulitzer Prize
winner.

Fulton Lewis Jr.
Mutual's noted
news commenta-
tor.

>:

Mme. Welington
Koo
Wife of China's
Ambassador to
Jreat Britain.

R K WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE
RANI. . u . . I A A -u V

Burton Holmes
Dean of travel-

NOW ON

SALE_

I ogee e ct~urers .*.. rTT ""- t-_. , --

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan