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February 11, 1944 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-02-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN "Al

TRWAT, FIM 11, 1944

THE MICTITG~&N- IVA11~Y FRIDAY, FEE. 11, 1944

Bricker States Platform as '44 Candidate

l

SOCIAL WORKERS STUDY:
Child Welfare Employes Are
In Special University Course

4>

The University Graduate School
has set. up a plan in cooperation with
the Michigan State Department of
Social Welfare to train employes of
the department in child welfare work
here.
According to Dean Clarence S.
Yoakum of the Graduate School the
plan aims to give training particular-
ly in child guidance and placement,
and is considered "in service train-
ing." "The purpose is to give people
more training for the job they are
actually doing," Dean Yoakum said.
Arriving in the early part of Jan-
uary, the new students have been
released from their jobs for several
weeks and will then go out into
the ┬žiej4,near Ann Arbor to work
with various social agencies. From
there, they will go' back to their
jobs where people in the depart-
ment will supervise their field work,
and will spend two days of every
week for six months obtaining fur-
ther instruction here.
While on campus, the 15 students
einrolled in the program are living
at the Michigan Children's Institute.
The plan was prepared by F. F.
Fauri, supervisor of the Bureau of

Social Security at Lansing, and act-
ting director of the State Depart-
ment of Social Welfare in consulta -
tion with Mr. C. F. Ramsey, director
of the Michigan Children's Institute,
and Mr. R. W. Kelso, director of the
curiculum of Social Work in Detroit.
The Ann Arbor course consists of
three days of intensified classroom
work carrying six hours of graduate
credit, and two days a week of su-
pervised field work carrying one sem-
ester hour of graduate credit.
Stomp Hostesses
Are Announced
Women of Kappa Alpha Theta,
Delta Gamma, Collegiate , Sorosis
and Betsy Barbour will be hostesses
for the last GI Stomp of the semes-
ter to be held from 3 to 5 p.m. to-
morrow in the North Lounge of the
Union.
A special feature of the Stomp this
week will be a jitterbug contest. The
winning rugcutters will be presented
with a box of valentine candy.
The affair is planned especially
for the entertainment of servicemen
and all women may come.

Summer Session'
Questionnaires
Must Be Filed
All Civilian Students
Are To Obtain Blanks
From Their Advisors
Civilian students must fill out and
return one of the Student Summer
Inquiry questionnaires which are now
being distributed by the War Board,
at the time their new elections are
approved by their counselors, classi-
fiers or advisors. I
This is the third year a question-
naire has been distributed. Its pur-
pose is to enable the University to
plan for accommodating those who
enroll for the summer program.
Whether the student is planning
to return for study this summer or
not, he is required to hand in a
blank. This applies to students in
the literary, pharmacy, architecture,
business administration, education,
public health, forestry and engineer-
ing schools. Seniors graduating in
February are not included.
President Alexander G. Ruthven
explained the underlying purpose of
the summer program: "The Univer-
sity, through its accelerated program,
is endeavoring to meet the needs of
its students in war time."
The questionnaires are being given
out with the registration materials in
the Registrar's Office in University
Hall. If the student did not receive
a questionnaire when he called for
his material, he is asked to return
and obtain one.
All faculty members are asked to
turn in the completed questionnaires
to the War Board, Rm. 1514 Rack-
ham Building.
Col. Rogers Is Called
Home by Mother's Illness
Col. F. C. Rogers, commandant of
the 3651st Service Unit, was called
to his mother's home in Florida
Sunday due to the illness of both
his mother and brother.
Mrs. Rogers accompanied him and
will return to Ann Arbor in a few
days.

K

Ohio Governor Condemns,
Smug National 'Absolutism'

Clearance
at
kkfl~~ire~Stove
Stee

WASHINGTON, Feb. 10.- {)-
Ohio's Governor John W. Bricker
took the wraps off his presidential
campaign strategy tonight and be-
fore an assembly of party chieftains
unfolded his plan to:
1--Fight the Roosevelt policies
down the line on domestic issues-
subsidies, taxes, financing, labor,
national service and the service vote.
2-Leave the conduct of the war
to the admirals and generals who he
thinks should get most of the credit
and should not be "interfered4 with.
Appears at Capital
The smartly-groomed, 50-year-old
Bricker revealed his domestic plat-
form in a speech to a Lincoln Day
dinner, the first time he has ap-
peared in the capital as an avowed
presidential candidate. Ohio Repub-
licans turned it into a Bricker room.
Earlier in the day, the governor
gave a press conference preview in
which he conceded President Roose-
velt some "credit" for the conduct of
the war but took the position that it
is a job for the professional military
men and they should be left alone
to do it.
Bricker criticized consumer food
subsidies as "postponing" the day
of payment, the federal war ballot
bill as inadequate in contrast to
a personally-favored idea of a
state ballot for servicemen, a civ-
ilian labor draft as "too late" now
to do any good, federal housing as
infringing on a job private indus-
try can do.
He also took a shot at what he
called British "interference" in U.S.
elections, referring to published edi-
torials in Britain favoring continu-
ance of Mr. Roosevelt in power.
Bricker, evincing confidence, re-
vealed his ideas in greater detail
than ever before and said that this
was possible because he had time to
formulate them since he first decid-
ed to get into the race. His confi-
dence was echoed by House minority
leader Martin of Massachusetts who
introduced Bricker, saying:
'Victory in the Air'
"The old elephant is on the march;
he sniffs victory in the air."
Martin said the GOP would win in
November because "millions of hon-
est ,sincere, patriotic Jeffersonian
Democrats will submerge party, to
the welfare of their country" and
join with the Republicans.
Bricker was the principal speaker
at a party gathering to celebrate
Lincoln's birthday, held in the May-
flower Hotel.
He laid down a five-plank plat-
form which recommended:
1-Return to "balanced bud-
get"; federal financing.
2-Establisbment of "responsi-
ble cabinet government" by elimi-
nating "czars" and super-imposed
agencies.
3-Simplified tax laws that re-
main stable, so drawn as to en-
courage "venture capital" and ex-
panding business; lower federal
taxes "as soon as possible" after
the war ends.
4-Assurances that state and
local governments have autonomy,
"not a mere sham and pretense

v -

financially dependent upon Wash-
ington:"
5-A clear-cut government labor
policy defined by a "fair" law and
" Just enforcement" of that law,
including a prohibition on wartime
strikes.
Bricker contrasted the Republican
party as "liberal" with the New Deal
as "reactionary:"
The Roosevelt administration "is
the American counterpart of the
sweep of absolutism which has de-
stroyed so much liberty around the
world ... it lacks faith in our peo-
ple ... it assumes that people can-
not take care of themselves," said
Bricker.
"The time has now come," he said,
"to take the policy making power of
government out of the hands of the
arrogant bureaucrats and return it
to the hands of the elected repre-
sentatives of the people."
Bricker said he was confident the
Republicans would win the 1944
election and added that he was
"more interested" in that-defeat-
ing the New Deal philosophy-than
in being President.

fo
pr
in
N
ZU
345
345

pen 9:30-6:00

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