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January 11, 1944 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-01-11

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Women's Staff
Invites Tryouts
To Meeting
Women Interested in Working
On 'The Daily' Should Attend
Explanatory Meeting Today
Women interested in trying out for
the Women's Staff of The Daily are
invited to attend a meeting which
will be held at 5 p.m. today in the
Publications Building.
Hours spent in work at The Daily
,are recorded as credit for participa-
tion in war activities, and advance-
ment from, the freshman to junior
staff is extremely rapid because of
the accelerated' academic program.
Tryouts' Duties Listed
Tryouts become familiar with Daily
style, are taught the fundamentals
of news Writing and begin to learn
headline writing and page make-up.
As sophomore staff :members, this
training is continued, with more em--
Phasis on individual feature writing
and specific news coverage and page
layout.
Junior night editors are responsible
for page layout once a week and cover.
extensive beats which take them all
over campus. Senior editors direct
the actual publication of the page,
assign beats and lead tryout meet-
ings. Because they require more
time and attention, junior and senior
positions are paid.
Anyone May Try Out
Although the staffs are named ac-
cording to school years, this does not
mean that only freshmen may be-
long to the try out staff. The present
junior staff is made up of both
juniors and sophomores, and fresh-
men, sophomore and juniors are
members of the sophomore staff. Ad-
vancement to higher positions:is made
on the basis of, ability, not class
standing.
For further information about the
staff, women may ,all Mary Anne
Olson at 22591 or Mariorie Rosmarin
at 23119.
Bandage Unit Open
Three Afternoons
This week the Surgical Dressings
Unit will meet as usual from 1 p.m.
to 5 p.m. oneWednesdays, Thursdays,
and Fridays in the League.
In addition to the regular room
used for this work, the Kalamazoo
Room has recently been opened to
accommodate additional women who
may be interested in working on this
project.
Attendance charts are kept for
every woman who has worked three
hours or more and this information
is registered with the Red Cross. The
goal for every coed on campus is fifty
hours by the end of this semester. I

-1 -- - re - " ,

A "R R, " q, AIN I IILC--- A(tMftV

Dormitories Totat Lwrge Anm o nt
in Five Weeks Sale of Stamps

A S SOCIAT E D

I

PRE SS

--

By PEG WEISS
The women's dormitories seem to
have gone a long way toward stamp-
ing out the slackers, as a total of
$1,776.64 in stamps after five weeks
of sales was announced yesterday by
Rosalie Bruno, co-chairman of Jun-
ior Girls Project dormitory sales.
Mosher Hall has turned in $553.3
from stamp sales, joining the Ma-
rines on Kiska on the League poster
Dn which each large campus house
ias an airplane which moves towarr
Tokyo with every war stamp sold ir
the house. The JGP publicity com
mittee is contemplating sending thl
Aosher plane on to Berlin sinc
.Pokyo will be passed any day now.
.ut the ship will have tough flyin
>ver the League Lobby, which is i-'
the way of a continuous journey.
Bernke Newton, Mosher's stam-
.shairman. has shown efficiency plu
sn handling stamp sales, selling vir
'ually one hundred per cent in a dor
mnitory of 207 women, and more thar
the quota for each girl. Each week
Miss Newton takes 384 stamps fror
the League office and the next weel
without fail turns in money for 384
stamps.
Geddes, 99% Participation
Geddes House, an auxiliary dormi-
tory at 1929 Geddes, reported 90
participation for the month of De-
cember, when Lois Iverson, chairmar
of sales in the house, turned in $45.51
from a house of 30 coeds.
Geddes House has a chart bearin
the name if each resident. A red star
appears for each stamp bought b
each girl, plus a blue star after thb
aame of each coed who has bought
Inte rf ra tern i ty Ball
Tickets Now Sold by
iChapter Presidents
Tickets for the eleventh annual
tnterfraternity Ball, which will be
held from 9 p.m. to midnight Satur-
day in the League Ballroom, may still
be secured from presidents of the
fraternity chapters that are active
on campus, Ball co-chairmen Hank
Schmidt, Jr., and Dave Upton, an.-
pounced yesterday.
Since there is a limited number o'
tickets for sale, fraternity men whc
want them are cautioned to get them
.ow. There will be no reopening of
the ticket 'sale once a sellout is an-
nounced. Bill Sawyer and his orches-
tra will play for the dance.
Following the Ball theme, "Michi-
gan Fraternities," active fraternitieu
will hang their shields on the ball.-
"oom walls which will be covered by s
iuge canopy. Blue leather programf:
gvith yellow Interfraternity keys in-
scribed on the covers will be the
dance favors.
Refreshments will be served
throughout the evening.

-

her quota of one dollar in stamps fol
the month.
Helen Newberry residence holds a
stamp dinner on the first Wednesday
of every month to supplement the
regular house sales of $1 to each gir-
every month. Stamps bought fo.
dinner are outside the quoar and fo;
their purchase thr buyer wcrsa ai
to dinner bearing "V." ' drod ii," or
some catch phrase.
IewLerry Pledges Monthly Sum
The majority of Newberry residents
zave pledged $1.00 in stamps a
nonth, and the dormitory is dressing
i large cardboard sailor in the lobby
as stamp sales pro;re ss. Newberry
3tamp representatives have sold
$210.20 in stamps.
Sales in other dormitories are as
ollows: Jordan. $214.70; ets:/ Bar-
bour, $167.05: Stockwell, $i.:5: and
vMartha Cook, $129.90.
Marcia Sharpe, JGP poster chair-
man, and Georgianna Leslie have put
up posters in women's dormitories
throughout campus.
us- Electea

p C.T U R.E

NEWS1ik

As

USO CouncilI

SUITED IN
WINTER PAlSTELS

Representatives
"Two new members have been
elected to represent the University on
the USO Council. The coeds chosen
are Shirley R. Sickels, '46, and Ruth
Edberg, '45," Jean Ga ffney, ci iir-
man of the Council anhoun ed yes-
terday.
..This Council" onin Lid Miss
Gaffney. "is composed of three men-
bers from the University and three
women chosen from the Ann Arbor
group." .The Ann Arbor representa-
tives are Jeanne Finlayson, Mildred
Gagalis, and Norma Cook.
At the initial meeting of the .USO
Council, it was decided to divide up
,he Junior Hostesses into six "com-
panies," with each Council member
At the head of one. The Council
members will have the rank of "Ma-
ior" and will choose other Junior
Hostesses to be their, "Captains,"
"Lieutenants," and "Sergeants." In
this manner, a hostess who shows
?erself capable and willing to work
may "rise from the ranks" and be-
come an "officer."
Each company will be composed of
about 130 Junior Hostesses and will
be responsible for taking complete
'harge of the UO Club for one day
I week.
WAA fNotL.ices
Fifty-three teams have been en-
'ered in the intramural basketball
tournament being conducted by the
WAA, the largest entry ever to be
recorded for this sports tournament,
according to Shelby Dietrich, intra-
mural manager. Jordan Hall leads
the list with six teams.
Because of the uprecedented size
"f the group, it has been necessary to
ask that each participating team
supply a person to keep time and to
score the games. A meeting will be
.eld at 4 p.m. Friday in Barbour Gym
.o acquaint the team scorekeepers
tnd timekeepers with the methods of
work.
Miss Dietrich emphasized that the
persons engaged in this work are just
as much a part of the team as the
?layers, and that they will have to be
resent at every game in which their
.eam participates. "Player substi-
tutes will not be able to act in this
'apacity since the handling of the
ime clock and the correct scoring
methods can't be learned a minute
before the game starts."
There will be no more meetings of
the Ski Club until sufficient snow
makes actual skiing possible. If club
Members have any questions about
he club (or the weather), they may
all Louise Forbush at 23279.
The University Women's Riding
Club will "play games" on horseback
:t its meeting at 6:15 p.m. today.
Mlans are also being made to hold
supper rides.
Water polo will be the order of the
.ay as the Swimming Club takes to
the water at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in
'he Barbour pool, Marie Cassetari,
club manager, announced. Anyone
wishing to join the club may do so
by calling Miss Cassetari at 22539.
Gunnery Instructors
To Rate P.O. Stripes
Petty officer ratings as full-fledged
- <r gunnery instructors are nowt onen
o enlisted women of the WAVES.
nnounced Navy Public Relations re-
-intly.
A training school has been estab-
shed at the Naval Air Training Cen-

I N T HE S A RA TOGCA'S WHEEL HO0U SE-Caft. John . Cassady,US, skipper of the
Areaf curie dltd' aratoca. neei'c throurh the Por-thole of the wheelhrouse on a South Pacific mission'

D F C - Eight-year-old Gordon
Campbell of Kippen, England,
displays the DFC posthumously
awarded to his father, Pilot Of-
ficer William G. Campbell at re.
rent ,palace 1nvestiture.

FLOATING STRONGHOLD-One of Britain's air-
craft carriers, spearheads of attack in mid-ocean battles, steams
along somewhere at sea. Carriers were credited with an impor-
tant role in suppressing the U-boat menace-

R E A D Y T O S A i L-sea bags packed, four of the guards
who man guns on merchant ships look over the new booklet of
games and puzzles issued by the National Recreation Association
for the armed forces. Left to right are Seamen First Class Rob-
ert Sahm of Cincinnati, John A. Smith, Augusta, Ga.; Peter M.
Byers, New Castle, Pa.; and Howard J. Zilch, Attleboro, Mass

tailored with precision.. .
finished with expensive-
looking details. A suit to
be worn in the tailored
manner or dressed up.
Cherry, Beige, Aqua, Toast,
Blue; also comes in Black,
Brown, Navy, Grey and
RAF Blue.
One of our many new
Spring Suits from

$25

to $59.95

R E C E P T 1 0 N B Y A R A B K I N C--Scene in the palace of King' Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia
(center) when he received Maj. Gen. Ralph Royce, U. S. commander in the Middle East. for a dis-
cussiou of economic and military matters. Left to right are Lt. William A. Kalif, UA; Gen. Royce;
King Ibn Saud; an interpreter; and James S. Moose. Jr.. the American minister.

D 1 C K E N S - Lt. Peter Dick-
ens (above) has received the
DSO for service with the light
coastal forces in England. Lt.
Dickens is a relative of the
author Charldm Dickens.

JANUARY CLEARANCE Continues
with COATS, SUITS, DRESSES at

11

i

< _., j --

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