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December 02, 1943 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-12-02

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VOL.LIV o. 2

JR

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, DEC. 2, 1943
FDR, Churchill, Chiang Kai-Shek Ag
To Strip Japanese of Imperialistic C

PRICE FIVE CENTS
ains

NO WAR SPIRIT:

* * *

* * *

* *

United

Nation

Leaders Decide Japan's Fate

at Conference

Student Blames Coed
Apathy on University
Editor's note:
The following letter was written to The Daily in answer to the edi-
torial on coed apathy in war work which ran yesterday. We feel that
the writer, who wishes to remain anonymous for obvious reasons, has
hit the root of the problem.
PERHAPS Miss Kennedy has almost hit the nail on the
head when she finally gets down to offering "adol-
escence" as an explanation of the co-ed's failure to take on
war-time responsibilities.
It is not, however, the escapist's adolescence, which she
implies, but rather it is the same kind of adolescence that
resulted in India's refusal to cooperate with Great Britain
in fighting the war-and the Michigan co-ed has not even
had the promise of better treatment after the war! It is
the adolescence of the person who has never had the oppor-
tunity to develop a sense of good citizenship and therefore
is not to take full blame for the failure.
To accuse the Michigan co-ed of "not knowing there's*
a war on," is to take the easy way out-to reach conclusion
without examining facts. One might as well accuse the
Indians of sending a treaty of alliance to the Japanese. We
must realize, in other words, that children cannot grow up
overnight.
A BACKWARD GLANCE REVEALS WOMEN ON
THE MICHIGAN CAMPUS OCCUPYING AN IN-
FERIOR POSITION. THEY HAVE BEEN HERE
MAINLY FOR THE DATING PLEASURE OF THE
MEN, NOT TO OCCUPY AN EQUAL PLACE WITH
THEM. It has been, of course, poor taste to mention this
publicly-there has been a hush-hush attitude surrounding
the question of why women occupied no important posi-
tions except in affairs that were confined solely to the
female of the species.
IN COMPARISON with other universities, Michigan has
had no women in the band "between halves," no girl
cheer leaders, and prior to the war, very few women in re-
sponsible positions on publications or in any other impor-
tant campus job. Now a crisis has occurred: the men are
gone, and suddenly, overnight, women are expected to blos-
son forth as capable and responsible members of campus
society.t
THIS IS NOT A VINDICATION OF THE FAIL-
URE OF WOMEN TO ACCEPT THEIR SOCIAL RE-
SPONSIBILITIES, BUT AN EXPLANATION THAT
POINTS TO A DEFINITE NEED FOR CHANGE. RE-
EDUCATION IS THE SOLUTION, NOT A POLICY
OF HOPING TO PRESS THE COEDS INTO SERVICE
BY "SCOLDING" THEM.
THE AVERAGE Michigan co-ed is a "baby." She has
been encouraged to be so on all sides. Instead of learn-
ing that a mature person continues to work, even when
there are obstacles, every effort is made to put the co-ed
in an ivory tower and once there to build a moat around it
so that she can't escape.
Of course she THINKS she has no time for war work
when she has been taught that poor little co-eds cannot
absorb any education if there are any distractions whatso-
ever and so there must be "captains" on each corridor, rac-
ing up and down, seeing that a strict military silence is ob-
served for the benefit of "students."
Her every move is supervised. Even her room is in-
spected every week. House mother, assistant house mothers,
social directors, night chaperones, house officers, corridor
leaders, ad infinitum, all cooperate to see that the co-ed
never has occasion to do any independent thinking, to learn
initiative, or to transfer any of the knowledge gained from
education to practical living.
NOW SHE IS, OVERNIGHT, ASKED TO STAND

INDEPENDENTLY ON HER OWN TWO FEET.
NEVER HAVING HAD EVEN THE RESPONSIBIL-
ITY OF DECIDING WHAT TIME TO RETURN
HOME AT NIGHT, SHE IS SUDDENLY SUPPOSED
TO AWAKEN WITH THE ABILITY TO DO STU-
DIES, CAMPUS ACTIVITIES, AND WAR WORK-
ALL AT ONCE.

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT PRESIDENT CHIANG KAI-SHEK P
. s agree on plan for bringing Japan to unconditional surrender and
islands.

'RIME MINISTER CHURCHILL
driving her back into her home

SPEAKS TOMORROW:
Culbertson To Give Lecture
On Post-War Settlement Plan

Ely Culbertson, author and noted
world strategist, will open the Post-
war Council's annual conference at
7:15 p. m. tomorrow in Rackham
Auditorium with a lecture on "Plan
for World Settlement."
The general theme of the confer-
ence, "World Organization. in the
Future" will be carried out further
in two student-faculty parleys to be
held at 2:30 p. m. Saturday in the
Goodfellow
Edition To Be
Sold Monday
Sales of Daily To Aid
New High Quota in
$2,000 Campus Drive
Going into the final week of pre-
parations for the $2000 Goodfellow
Drive, the Goodfellow committee an-
nounced yesterday that campus resi-
dence groups have been solicited for
pledges and the assignment of posts
for the sale of Goodfellow Daily's
Monday has been made.
Pledges from sororities, fraterni-
ties, dormitories, and cooperatives
should be sent to the Publications Of-
fice not later than 5 p.m. Monday.
"The enthusiasm and cooperation
of campus organizations in arrang-
ing for contributions and assuming
sales posts has been gratifying," one
member of the committee said yester-
day.
The money from the drive will go
to the local Family and Child Service,
the Goodwill Fund, and the Textbook
Lending Library.
- Be A Goodfellow ----
Wire Confirms
Harmon's Safety
Capt. Enslen Fatally
Wounded on Mission
Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Harmon,
2200 Vinewood, received a telegram
from the War Department yesterday,
officially informing them of the
safety of their son, Tom.
The telegram, signed by Adjutant-
General Ulio, read, "I am pleased to
inform you that your son, Lt. Tom D.
Harmon, is reported safe and ac-
counted for."
The Harmons also received a letter
yesterday from Sanford Enslen, bro-
ther of Capt. Lewden Enslen, com-
manding officer of Tom's fateful
mission over Asia. Enslen received
word Nov. 27 that his brother, one of
the four downed, had died of wounds
Nov. 11. In his letter he said, "I hope
that when you receive word of your
son, God will grant that it will be
good news."
-- Be A Goodfellow -

Union. The first session in Room
316 will deal with "The Place of Ed-
ucation and Propaganda in World
Organization."
Prof. Claude Eggertson of the
School of Education, Dr. Norman"
Maier of the psychology department,
Prof. James K. Pollock of the politi-
cal science department, Prof. Here-
ward T. Price of the English depart-
ment and Max Dresden of the physics
department are the faculty members
who will participate. John Condylis,
Barbara Greenberg, Pat McGraw and
Nacny Richter will form the student
board of the parley.
The second session of the parley, in
Room 318, will deal with "Types of
World Organization." Dr. E. W.
Blakeman, Religious Counselor, Dr.
Jan Hostie, lecturer for the University
War Training Program, Prof. Wilbur
Humphreys of the English depart-
ment and Prof. Preston Slosson of
the history department, together with
Lorraine Maum, Martin Shapero,
Joyce Siegan and Harvey Weisberg
will compose the student-faculty
board.
Tickets for Culbertson's lecture will
be on sale today and tomorrow from
1 to 2 p. m. and 4 to 8 p. m., in the
League and Union, and from 1 to 2
p. m. and 5 to 6 p. m. in the Engine
Arch. In the West Quad tickets will
be sold during mess line-up. There
will be no attendance fee for the Sat-
urday parleys. Ruthu Daniels, '44,
Chairman of the Council, said that
all interested students are urged to
attend both the Friday and Saturday
meetings of the conference.
World News
In Brief .. .
Nazi Defenses Smashed.
ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, AL-
GIERS, Dec. 1-(AP)-Under the heav-
iest tactical air support of the entire
Italian campaign, the British Eighth
Army smashed through German de-
fenses beyond fallen Sangro Ridge
today while American troops of the
Fifth Army fought forward three
miles in the central sector, possibly
heralding the start of an "all out"
Allied drive on Rome.
* * ,*
Germans Counterattack
LONDON, Thursday, Dec. 2.-(/P)
-The Germans have struck out
with new vigor on every sector of
the Russian front in a major bid
to stem the Russian offensive,
counter-attacking yesterday as ma-
ny as 15 times in one area.
RAF Blasts Solingen
LONDON, Thursday, Dec. 2-V(P)-
Large formations of fighter-escorted
U.S. Flying Fortresses and Liberators
striking through icy, cloud-spattered
skies attacked the Rhineland indus-
trial city of Solingen yesterday for

Dean Stason
Indicates U'
Stand on Vets
Faculty To Study
Best Means of Aiding
Returning Veterans
The Board of Regents passed a
resolution at last Saturday's meeting
recommending "that all faculties of
the University study the best ways of
aiding returning servicemen after the
war" and at the same time rejected a
proposal to lower the entrance re-
quirements of the Law School. it
was learned yesterday.
Regent John D. Lynch of Detroit
entered the proposal advocating
modification of entrancedrequire-
ments in the Law School to facilitate
the continued education of discharg-
ed servicemen.
Dean's Statement
E. Blythe Stason, Dean of the Law
School, opposed the proposal and is-
sued the following statement to The
Daily last night:
"Although University authorities
wish to help returning veterans, the
difference is over the best method to
act.
"The proposalto admit tohthe Law
School veterans with only three years
of onlywbarely passing grades in col-
lege would greatly reduce present
entrance requirements. A class of
veterans would thereby be permitted
to enter the Law School who would
be almost certain to fail and be asked
to withdraw at the end of the first
year.
Harm to Veterans
"If standards were lowered to per-
mit them to remain, they would re-
ceive an unsatisfactory legal educa-
tion and would probably fail their
state bar examinations.
"Veterans would be harmed rather
than helped by such a measure.
"We believe that there is a better
way. The University in cooperation
See DEAN STASON, p. 4
- Be A Goodfellow -
Lautenschla geri
Speaks Here
Returning to the Michigan campus
for the firsttime since he received
his master's degree here in 1920, theI
Rev. Stanton Lautenschlager of
Chengtu, China, will discuss the
problems of China todaydtomorrow
and Satuday before several Ann
Arbor audiences.
Mr. Lautenschlager, who was a
professor of modern history and soci-
ology at Cheeloo University, China,
will speak at the Family Night dinner
at 6 p.m. today in the First Presby-
terian Church.
At 8:15 p.m. today in the Kellogg
Auditorium he will lecture on the
topic, "The Students in Free China"
under the auspices of the Department
of History and International Center.
- Be A Goodfellow -
Arrani Will Give
Mrti'tnI Tt)Yi irrnie

More Important
Meeting Foreseen
Details of New Front in Europe, Middle
East Affairs Decided Upon by Three
By JOHN F. CHESTER
Associated Press Correspondent
CAIRO, Dec. 1.-President Roosevelt, Prime Minister Churchill
and President Chiang Kai-Shek have held an historic five-day con-
jf erence, have bound their nations in an agreeement to beat Japan into
unconditional surrender and to strip her of all her imperialistic gains
of the last half century, and have left for unannounced destinations.
Details for a new front in Europe and concerning Mediterranean
and Middle East affairs also probably were decided upon, it was
learned tonight. A reliable source confirmed reports that the British-
American general staffs had gathered in greater stength than ever
before in a separate session, with the Chinese not participating.
MORE IMPORTANT MEETING FORESEEN
(In Washington it was assumed that an even more important meeting,
particularly on the European phases of the war, would be held with Premier
Joseph Stalin of Russia. Reuters dispatches from Lisbon, Portugal, said the
I three had left for Teheran, capitol of Iran, there to meet Stalin In the
biggest United Nations Conference of the war.
(Berlin broadcasts said the Conference already was underway". in
Teheran-on the Russian supply corridor where British-American-Ruslian
wartime cooperation has had its most conspicuous success.)
In an extraordinary atmosphere of secrecy and precaution, the three
leaders of the United States, Britain and China, representing- more..than
1,000,000,000 people, counting all those of the British Empire, met for five
days-from Nov. 22 through Nov. 26-while surrounded by the highest galaxy
of military, supply and political advisers, and departed at least three 'days
before the news was given to the public.
PLAN OF MILITARY OPERATIONS AGREED UPON
A communique issued at the close declared they had agreed upon a plan
of military operations against Japan which would "bring unrelenting pros
sure against their brutal enemies by sea, land and air."
Declaring their purpose to drive Japan back into her home islands, the
three powers outlined this specific four-point program:
1. Japan must disgorge all the islands she has seized in the Pacific since
the beginning of the First World War in 1914 (from which she gained, from
Germany, the Marshall, Caroline and Mariana archipelagoes in which she
planted bases for her attack on the United States).
2. Manchuria, Formosa, the Pescadores (the 21 islands lying between
Formosa and the Chinese mainland) and all other territories taken from
China must be restored to her.
3. Korea is to be made free and independent "in due course."
4. Japan must be expelled from "all other territories which she has taken
by violence and greed." (This would cover all the lands she has seized since
Pearl Harbor, the Philippines, Wake and Guam; British Hongkong, Malaya,
Burma and islands of the Pacific; the Netherlands East Indies and also
French Indo-China.
JAPAN TO LOSE ALL TERRITORY GAINED BY AGGRESSION
The above blueprint for breaking of the Japanese empire and liberating
its conquered peoples in effect would divest Japan of the territorial loot won
by aggression or trickery in five wars-from the Sino-Japanese war of 1894
to the present conflict, climaxed by her surprise attack on Pearl Harbor and
her rapid conquests in the South Pacific.
The conferences were held in a strictly guarded zone which restrictions
even yet will permit only to be described as in North Africa. (In Washington
it was presumed that the meeting took place in Cairo or nearby, since the
news came under that dateline, and the principal participants visited the
sphinx and pyramids which are in the vicinity. That the decisions reached
See ALLIED, p. 4

1,026 Marines
Die at Tarawa;
2,557 Wounded
WASHINGTON, Dec. 1. - (P)-
Tarawa, the bloodiest fight in all the
Marine Corps' proud history, cost the
American'victors 1,026 dead and
2,557 wounded.
Reporting the heavy toll suffered
in taking the two-mile long atoll and
cracking Japan's central Pacific de-
fenses, the Navy said tonight that
casualties totalledr3,772 in the three
Gilbert Island operations. Sixty-five
were killed and 121 wounded at Ma-
kin and one killed and two.wounded
at Abemama.
Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox
had warned beforehand, however,
that the losses in the 76 hours it
took to capture Tarawa were severe.
- Be A Goodfellow -
New Labor
Plan Issued.
A new and strengthened employ-
ment stabilization plan for the Detroit
area, which includes all of Washten-
aw County, has been worked out on
a voluntary basis by the labor-man-
agement conimittee of the War Man-

Ga lens Drive
To Start Friday
$2,500 Is New Goal
For Christmas Fund
Galens members will be stationed
at strategic points on camipus tomo~r-
row and Saturday with loads of tags
to receive campus contributions for
their fifteenth annual Christmas
campaign to raise funds for children
in the University Hospital.
Shooting at a goal of $2,500, the
medics hope to take in enough to fl-
nance their ninth-floor workshop
where many hospitalized children
pass the dreary days painting, sa-
ing, participating in group projects
and having a good time.
On display in one of the downton
store windows is a graphic presenti-
tion of the kind of work the childten
do in the Galens workshop.
Many times the Galens workshop
has aided directly in the recovery of
these boys and girls, according to
Miss Dorothy Ketchum of the Social
Service department at the hospital.
- Be A Goodfellow -
Reoent Named,
To Assist Kelly.

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