100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 11, 1944 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-06-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JITNTE 11, 19~44

Rl Seniors Invited To Participate in Swing-Out

O dy

Procession for Renewed Event
To Be Formed at Main Library

Women's Glee Club To Lead
Campus Sing Following March
The entire senior class of the Uni-
versity is invited to the first Senior
Swing-Out in four years, which will
begin at 6:45 p. m. today in front of
tfie Main Library.
All students who will be graduated
this month or in October or February
are urged to participate in the af-
fair. This includes members of the
Navy V-12 Unit, and Army and Navy
medical and dental students.
Lit School To Lead March
The same order of grouping which
will be used at graduation exercises
on June 24 will be followed at the
Swing-Out. Signs will be posted in-
dicating where each section, classi-
fied according to schools, is to meet.
Literary seniors will lead the pro-
cession, followed by seniors from the
schools of education, engineering,
medicine, nursing, law, pharmacy,

dental, business administration, for-
estry, music, public health, and the
graduate school.
Sing To Be Held
The line of march wil proceed from
the Library toward Alumni Memorial
Hall, and from there up State Street
to North University. The procession
will turn and march to Barbour
Gymnasium and back to the Library.
A campus sing will follow the
Swing-Out, led by the Women's Glee
Club, which will also present several
special numbers.
Caps and gowns must be worn by
all seniors except servicemen and
nurses. Engineering students may
secure their caps and gowns between.
3 p. m. and 5 p. m. at the League,
and al others may get theirs at Moe's
Sport Shop.
Dressings Unit
Lists Honor Roll
Delta Delta Delta sorority led the
Surgical Dressings Unit competition
on the final honor roll of the spring
term with a total of 22 hours, Fran-
ces Goldberg, publicity chairman,
announced yesterday.
Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Delta Pi
and Kappa Delta were next with 19%,
19 and 19 hours respectively. Gam-
ma Phi Beta completed the list with
16 hours.
Augsberger House was the only
League house to make the weekly
honor roll, and no dormitories com-
pleted the minimum quota.
"Because of the enthusiastic sup-
port University women have given the
unit, we have been able to finish
the last quota of dressings set for us
by the local Red Cross unit," Miss
Goldberg said.

Michigan
Will Hold

Dames
Banquet

The Michigan Dames will hold
their annual banquet at 6:30 p. m.,
Tuesday, June 13, at the Michigan
lLeague, according to Mrs. Frank J.
Bell, general chairman in charge of
the arrangements.
The new officers are: president,
Mrs. Matthew Van Winkle; vice-
president, Mrs. Donald MacDonald;
recording secretary, Mrs. H. E.
Barsnes; corresponding secretary,
Vrs. Austin H. Beebe, Jr.; and treas-
urer, Mrs. Royal B. Brunson.
Members of the advisory board
who will be present are: Mrs. Alex-
ander G. Ruthven, Dr. Margaret Bell,
Mrs. E. W. Blakeman, Mrs. Roy W.
Cowden, Mrs. Kenneth A. Easlick,
Mrs. C. E. Griffin, Mrs. Charles H.
Griffits, Miss Ethel McCormick, Mrs.
Charles A. Sink and Mrs. Harry A.
Towsley.

Coeds Needed
Now to Work in
Union, Quad
Part-Time Jobs Are Available
At University Laundry and
League; Any Hours Suitable
Coeds interested in doing part-
time work for board or pay during
the summer session or term or for
the remainder of the semester are
urged to apply immediately at the
League, Union or West Quadrangle,
according to Pat Coulter, personnel
l administrator for undergraduate wo-
men.
Help is also needed at University
Laundry which handles all laundry
work for University Hospital, the
East and West Quadrangles, the
League and Union. The Laundry is
open from 7a.i m. to 5:30 p. m. and
workers may arrange their own
hours. A minimum of six hours each
week is asked of each worker. Wages
are 53 cents per hour.
i Workers Needed
Cafeteria workers are the chief
requirement of the League, Union
and West Quadrangle. Hours may
be arranged at all those places and
meals may be eatenr at the place of
employment.
The Union is open from 7 a. m. to
7:30 p. m. Wages start at 55 cents
per hour. Students interested in
working should apply in person at
the manager's office.
Further Information at League
West Quadrangle workers are
needed for breakfast from 6:45 a. m.
to 7:45 a. in., for lunch from 11:45
a. in. to 1:45 p. m., for dinner from
5:45 p.m. to 7 p.m., and for Sunday
supper from 5:30 p. in. to 6:30 p. m.
48 cents is the hourly rate and all
meals may be eaten in the Quad-
rangle.
Further information about League
work may be obtained at the bus-
iness cffice on the first floor of the
League.
SoftballManager
To Notify Houses
All houses with softball games to
be played this week will be notified
by telephone, according to Pat Dan-
iels, '46, Softball Manager.
Since only a few games remain to
be played, it is hoped that the wea-
ther will permit the games to be
played before the week of finals.

I

j/ wc

eet

, , \ \ \ \ \\\' \ \\\ \\ \ \ \\ t

Od

&

By NANCY GROBERG
IT ISN'T anything new, but we have arrived at the conclusion that nothing
comes to people quite so easily as criticism. Not constructive criticism,
mind you, but the type that tears down everything in sight, the type that
masquerades as mature judgment, the type that veils itself in the embryo
stage and emerges, finally, in tie nebulous, undefined collection of "ideas"
known, sometimes, as "collegiate cynicism."
T HE COLLEGIATE cynics are flourishing now. The University is a
hotbed of them. They are not shy. Approach them with an Anti-Poll
rax petition and you will receive, in place of a signature, a lecture on the
futility of trying to make democracy work, the inherent evil in our govern-
nent, the lost generation, the stupidity of officials, the blackness of the
future. Idealism, in any form, they brand as naivete. Optimism is, in
their eyes, the mark of immaturity.
RIGHT NOW the collegiate cynics are laughing because MYDA and the
Inter-Racial Association sent delegates to Washington to urge support
)f the proposed Anti-Poll Tak measures. They curl their lips and report
,hat "it didn't help," and on this so-called facing of facts they base their
refusal to believe in much of anything.
WHAT THE collegiate cynics fail to see is that for every one of them,
for every inert pessimist on this campus, there is a healthy, active in-
dividual who believes that something can and will be done to make
democracy work. Too busy sneering to see beyond their own noses, the
,ynics tell us that we are wasting our time-the country is a colossal mess;
he position of the Negro is beyond hope; human nature will not allow for
!mprovement; education ain't what it's cracked up to be; we are tilting at
windmills.
UT WHAT they do not see is that if enough people tilt, they may knock
off one or two arms; that the Negro's position will not be beyond hope
until the last healthy mind has become diseased enough to give up too;
that human nature, if there really is such a thing, is more pliable than
most people suspect; that education will become what it's cracked up to
be, when we make it so. In the active Idealist whom he brands as a childish
optimist, the passive, destructive critic fails to see the agent of change
for the better-the only agent we have. What his conviction amounts to
in the end is a curious and pathetic form of blindness. He professes to
'1,ve thought things through, when he has, in reality, shut his eyes tightly
lest he see beyond the scornful tip of his nose.
AND THE wonderful thing about it is that the constructive critic, the
one wljo refuses to believe that "it wouldn't help," has not given up
hope even for the collegiate cynic. He proposes, instead, to take his blind
compatriot by the back of the neck and toss him out into the open air.
Once there, whether he stays or not is on his own shoulders. But there
are lots of nice things to see out in the open air.
Come on out, fellers-the weather's fine!

each present a short report on a dif- week, and this will be the last meet-
ferent breed of horse. A prize will ing of the semester.
L/1'i?
I . Yardley's Lan mtsei Slaave I i1I $1.00
.Ynardley's Lavender Slaate 41i.e on $1.25
:3. iardleyN Brilliaim d*ai1.00
4. Cop1ey MOeumN Suauvimng SeIs $ I.00 - $5.75
5. Ivan Shave lotiOli aud Coioalxe I 01 -$1.75
6. L'Ore Menl's Esseuitibs $1 .00 -$5.75
aL Fuheu-ge 1feuu's Co ogae $1 75 -$500
S H O P S F O R W O M E N
ANN A4801R JACKSON * BATTLE CREEK * LANSING
DIAL 9317 1108 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

CeI ra

Riding Clubs T(
At a supper joint meeting in the
Russian Tea Room of the League at
6 p. m. Wednesday Crop and Saddle
and the University Women's Riding
Club will discuss the various phases
of horsemanship.
Three women from each club will

D Meet at Supper
be awarded to the coed who, in the
estimation of the clubs, has given
the best report.
Members of the clubs are to get
their suppers in the cafeteria and
then go directly to the Russian Room,
Neither of the clubs will ride this

For INDIVIDUALIZED II

FUR

STORAGE

217 East Liberty St.

I

ti,
j ' 1 '
.zsJ" kt. ;r
f
}
t

o.:.,,... ... r e,:

..r.
Y tt yy
C 5 x0 y
k } 55'
3FfS2 .Q
t %
'
fi
w 1
t , .. a
t .
' a
,, ;
4 t
^, c
.y
. §

II
DEFINITELY FRONT PAGE FASHION
NEWS
The Wfar ek

I

Bare shouldered beauties
Heat defiers for Summer Play!

" :;
'>:.
,_, =::
as; ' . ;
?;:,,::

r

I---,

BLOUSES - "c" what we
mean-they're Cool, Corn-
fy, Charming.
$2.50 to $12.95

7)

G

We're being
practical this
year ... in a
charmingly femi-
nine sort of way

oiL~GyHAL V _
one-ounce bottle plus federal tax
FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY. One of the oldest and most
beloved of D'Orsay Perfumes, famous on two continents
for its mysteriously subtle scent. Beautifully packaged to
keep or to give -and what an enchanting gift it is!
But remember, this is your once-a-year chance.

PLAYSUITS that can take
plenty rough and tumble
wear that need no pamper-
ing and come thru, when it

SUNNY PINAFORES, Bare-
backed for lots of Vitamin
D.

,N

by ANN HAVILAND

/'
y3.

comes to laundering.

BASQUE WESKITS to wear
with slacks or shorts, too, at
$3.50

Lasting essence of romantic nights ... cool and
dewy as the living flowers in the summer shadows.
truly captured by Ann IHaviland, genius parfumer

f P"5",
4
v:e4if7aF

SLACKS with slick jackets,
solid pcrtners for play girls
f rom $8.95.
SHORT-ALLS, so right for
play time! at $3.00. Shorts,
too. Loads of them.

3'
,.
!'
J =l
R

'?''S
5'- :
n.',,n
" Jf
:C x
!i' Zy :,
. -° 2
^ , '' e
. .
f
x

Perfume ... 3.50, 6
Toilet Water....1.5
Body Powder...5.(
Sachet... 2.50, 4.5
in 20% Fwwa F"." 2-"

.50, 11.50

THIS IS THE LAST STRAW
That is, it's the latest straw

0, 2.75, 4.75
00
0
rs
'. x
9y '

bag shipment,
love them.

and she'll

t
p d

1H ~

Buy That EXTRA War Bond Today!

i

wl

Aa p

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan