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June 11, 1944 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-06-11

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SUNDAY, JUNE 11, 1944

L'HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Graft

Prosecution Announces Surprise

Witnesses

To

Testify

23 Defendants Charged with
Legislative Graft Conspiracy
Trial, Expected To Last at Least a Month,
Will Open Monday at Mason Court House

By the Associated Press
LANSING, June 10.-The prosecu-
tion hinted today it would call some
"surprise" witnesses to testify in the
legislative graft conspiracy trial of
23 defendants, which will open Mon-
day in the old courthouse at Mason.
The trial, the first resulting from
Circuit Judge Leland W. Carr's one-
man grand jury investigation of
charges of graft in state government,
is expected to last at least a month.
It will be heard before Circuit Judge
John Simpson of Jackson, himself a
former Michigan legislator.
Attorneys Listed
At the prosecution table will be
special Prosecutor Kim Sigler, Coun-
ty Prosecutor Victor C. Anderson and
Special Assistant H. H. Warner,
while the defense has martialed a
large and high-powered array of
counsel, to present one of the biggest
legal staffs ever assembled for a
single case in Michigan. The de-
fense attorneys will file their ap-
pearance notices Monday.
Selection of the jury may be time-
consuming, since the prosecution and
defense may exercise 230 peremptory
challenges if they choose, but it was
understood questioning of prospec-
tive jurors would be placed in the

trial judge's hands to expedite mat-
ters.
Jury Not To Be Locked Up
Sigler said he did not want the
jury locked up for duration of the
trial, a frequent practice in import-
ant trials to guard against possible
attempts by outsiders to influence
jurors. .e said "it would be an im-
position on the jurors in a time when
there is much work to do on the farm
and elsewhere and when. labor is
scarce if we refused to allow them to
go home when court adjourns for the
day. We have confidence in the in-
tegrity of our jurors."
Circuit Court examination of the
defendants brought many dramatic
moments but the trial is expected to
have more. Fireworks at the examin-
ation came strictly from the prose-
cution table as the defense learned
details of what the grand jury al-
leged in the nature of crimes com-
mitted. Sigler said he had not play-
ed all of his strong cards in that
proceeding. Neither side will be un-
der wraps when the case is before
the jury.
Observe Golden Rule,
MSC Graduates Told
EAST LANSING, June 10-(AP)-
More than 600 Michigan State Col-
lege seniors, who received their de-
grees at the college's 86th annual
commencement, were told today that
the surest basis for international
peace and understanding is the uni-
versal application of the "Golden
Rule."
Dr. Howard L. Bevis, President
of Ohio State University, said in a
prepared address that "international
comity can rest only upon the same
basis as personal comity," and that
"whatsoever nations would have done
to them, they must be prepared to do
to others.

CIO Mails Full
Ballot Requests
To Servicemen
Legislature To Consider
Use of Short Ballot
DETROIT, J u n e 10-(P)-The
CIO's Political Action Committee in
Michigan has started the mailing to
250,000 Michigan CIO members in
the armed services of cards they may
use in applying for full ballots for
the general election November 7.
August Scholle, state head of the
committee, said it would be neces-
sary for the service man or woman
to fill in on the printed forms only
a few lines of information, then to
mail it to his city or township clerk.
Election officials have assured
him, Scholle said, that nearly every
member of the Armed forces who
sends in such an application will re-
ceive a full ballot, the exceptions be-
ing those - whose transfer might de-
lay delivery of their mail to them.
At Lansing Governor Kelly today
received a rough draft of Legislation
to be acted on by the Specal Legisla-
tive Session June 19, designed to
permit Michigan service men and
women to use the federal short-form
war ballot.
The state Elections Commission,
concerned to prevent service men
from casting both the full state and
short federal ballots, recommended
that the Secretary of State be given
authority to promulgate regulations
governing use of the federal ballot,
rather than that the Legislature de-
tail such regulations in the statute.
Senior Class To Meet
Dean Ivan C. Crawford of thekCol-
lege of Engineering will speak on
"The Future of Our University" at
the senior class meeting of the engin-
eers to be held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday
in Rm. 348 of West Engineering
Buildings after which there will be a
general discussion of graduation
plans.

Camp To Offer
Geology Course
This Summer
Camp Davis in Jackson, Wyoming
wil be opened on July 3, for the sum-
mer course in field geology, accord-
ing to A. J. Eardley of the Geology
Department.
The ten-weeks' course which will
continue until September 9, will of-
fer a basic field course for the first
six weeks and advanced work for the
last month. At least two semesters
of work in the geology department
are required for this summer work.
For students who have no geology
at all, the regular basic Geology 11
course will be offered during the last
four weeks of the period. There are
no prerequisites other than regular
college entrance requirements for
this course.
Mr. Eardley stated that the geolo-
gy department expects about 35 girls
and 20 men to attend the session in
Wyoming. The students will repre-
sent universities and colleges all over
the country, as well as the University
of Michigan.
The teaching staff will include six
instructors and three assistants.

Outdoor suppers and informal
meetings today will conclude church
guild programs for the semester, al-
though some groups will reopen their
activities for the summer session.
Canterbury Club at St. Andrew's
Episcopal church will hold a picnic
supper at 6 p. m. today at the home
of Nancy Hayes on 1555 Washtenaw.
Dr. Henry Lewis will lead the dis-
cussion.
r Riverside Park, across the railroad
station, will be the picnic grounds
of t h e Congregational - Disciples
Guild for their meeting today.
Lutheran Student Association will
hold their annual senior banquet at
5:30 p. m. at Zion Parish hall to hon-
or the graduating members of the
group.
Westminster Guild will hold an in-
formal meeting at 5 p. m. at the
First Presbyterian church with sup-
per following. Wesleyan Foundation
will also have a meeting and supper
at 5 p. m. at the First Methodist
Church.
Children in the church school and
students at the First Unitarian
church will participate in the fam-
ily Sunday service at 11 a. m. to-
day.

A baccalaureate service for gradu-
ating seniors of the First Methodist
church will be held at 8 p. m. today.
Rev. Chester Loucks of the First
Baptist chur'ch will preach and mu-
sic will be furnished by the Methodist
choir. Seniors will meet at 7:50 p.
m. in the social hall and go to the
church auditorium together.
Conservation Group Meets
LANSING, June 10-(AP)-The
State Conservation Commission meets
at Holland Monday and Tuesday.

Methodist Church Honors Seniors
Guilds Conclude Activities Today

Ferguson Will
Discuss Plating
Dr. A. L. Ferguson of the chemis-
try department will attend the an-
nual meeting of the American Elec-
troplaters' Society to be held Mon-
day, Tuesday, and Wednesday in
Cleveland.
One of the sessions will have as
its topic "Hard Cromium Plating".
The topics of the meeting are appro-
priate at this time for the develop-
ment of electrolytic porous chormium
has been one of the most outstand-
ing war developments in electroplat-
ing. Papers will also be presented
at the convention.

. .

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Iiiai P/eajune

OCTOBER
GRADUATES
SENIOR PICTURES
FOR THE ENSIAN
MUST BE IN OFFICE
BY AUGUST 15th
The MICHIGANENSIAN
Student Publications Bldg.

Seniors
Official
GIADUATION
ANNOUNCEMENTS
On Sale at
UILRICH'S BOOK STORE

IN IA

at
Golfside Riding Stables
PRIVATE OR GROUP INSTRUCTION
WOODED BRIDLE PATH
SPECIAL RATES FOR SERVICEMEN
COURTESY CAR

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Phone 2-3441

3250 East Huron River Drii

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DIE YANKS' LONG REACH
Invest More Than Before
In The Fifth War Loan Drive

STARTING MONDAY, JUNE 12

THE REAL FIGHT IS ON!

And as the reach

all-Out
. ..our

backing of the 5th War Loan Drive
willing oversubscription of War Bond

3 ' j

of our armies extends over more and more
Axis-dominated territdry, it becomes increas-
ingly vital to give them every ounce of sup-
port that can be mustered. On the homefront
one.of the biggest contributions can be our

quotas early in the drive. What better evi-
dence of wholehearted cooperation can we
give the boys on the fighting fronts?

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