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June 06, 1944 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-06-06

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EXTRA!

it(

4 ii

EXTRA!

VOL. LIV No. 153 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 6, 1944

PRICE FIVE CENTS

Wealther
LONDON, June 6-(AP)-
The sun broke through heavy
clouds at times in the Dover
Strait area this first day of the
Allied invasion of Western Eu-
rope..
After a daybreak shower there
was sunshine, but later banks of
heavy clouds swept up from the
northwest.*

<V

By WES GALLAGHER
Associated Press Correspondent
SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, ALLIED EX-
P'EDITIONARY FORCE, June 6.-American, Brit-
ish and Canadian troops landed in northern France
this morning' launching the greatest overseas mili-
tary operation in history with word from their su-
preme commander, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower,
that "we will accept nothing except full victory"
over the German masters of the continet- t.

The invasion, which Eisenhower called "a
great crusade," was announced at 7 :32 a. m.
G.reenwichl IMeaii Time (3 :32 a.m., Eastern War
Time) in this one-sentence communique No. 1:
"Under the command of Gen. Eisenhower,
Allied naval forces supported by strong air forces
began landing Allied armies this morning on the
northern coast of France."
Montgomery Heads Assault
It was announced moments later that Bri.
* * * * * *

* * *

* * *

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"ST NAZAIRE I XI (N
MAYENNE ARGENTAN ELE3EUF
Allied landings on the coast on France are reported by the German radio to be between Cherbourg
and Le Havre (indicated by arrows), along the south side of the River Seine and the coast of Normandy.
Reports from the Supreme headquarters, Allied Expeditionary Forces, have named no speci"c invasion area,
merely stating that landings are being made in Normandy.

* * *

* * *

* m

Eisenhower Issues. Orders

tain's Gen. Sir Bernard L. Montgomery, hero of the
African desert, was in charge of the assault.
The locations of the landings were not an-
n, ounced.
Eisenhower himself wished Godspeed to the
parachutists who were the first to land on the en-
emy-held soil of France.
For three hours previous to the Allied an-
nouncement the German radio had been pouring
forth a series of flashes, reporting that the Allies
were landing between Le Havre and Cherbourg
along the south side of the Bay of the Seine and
along the north coast of Normandy.
This would be across the channel and almost
due south of such British ports as Hastings, Bright-
on, Portsmouth and ,Bournemouth.
Prachutists Used
The Germans also said parachutists had des-
cended in Normandy and were being engaged by
Nazi shock troops.
In a special order of the day issued to all sol-
diers, sailors and airmen uxnder his command' Gen.
Eisenhower said:
"'We will accept nothing except full victory."
This morning a shattering barrage such as reduced the
defenders of the Mediterranean island of Pantelleria last
summer was laid dwn by the combined air forces.
Added to this barrage was the thunder of naval war-
ships off the coast behind the advancing naval craft. The
Royal Navy had been waiting for months for this moment,
while light and heavy units of the American Navy quietly
gathered in British harbors for the same task.
The American Coast Guard vwas there, too, manning
landing craft, transports and rescue ships. A small number
of American Navy planes also took part.
In the landing craft were men who knew the beaches on
which they were to land like the back of their hands. For
months in English camps they had drilled down to the finest
detail for their task. They had been formed into combat
lines, some of a dozen men, some of several thousand.
Eisenhower told his mern they were "embarking on a
great crusade toward which we have striven these many
xnonths," and warned themx that they were facing a tough,
well-prepared enemy.
Fighting Cited at Caen
Berlin said the "center of gravity" of the fierce fighting
was at Caen, 30 miles southwest of Le Havre and 65 miles
southeast of Cherbourg.
Caen is 10 miles inland from the sea, at the base of the
7 S-mile wide Normandy Peninsula.
Heavy fighting also was reported between Caen and
T rouvilie.
One of Berlin's first claims was that the first British
parachute division was badly mauled.
General Montgonery, hero of the African desert, was
leading the assault of the Allied Liberation Army.
No other Allied conunanders were announced for the
thousands of battle-trained Allied troops, although Gen.
Omar Bradley has been in command of American Ground
Forces in England for several months.
Bradley participated in the Tunisian victory.
Thousands of battle-trained American, British and Ca-
nadian troops hurled themselves a Hitler's western defenses
aftery onths of preparation.
Huge troopship arm adas slipped out of English ports in
the darkness and sped toward Europe where four years ago
almost to the day Britain brought back the last battle-worn

t

* * *

54-YEAR OLD PLANNER:

To Allied Invasion

Troops

LONDON, JUNE 6-(AP)-Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the following order of tde day to
his invasion troops today:
Soldiers, sailors and airmen of the Allied expeditionary force:
You are about to embark on a great crusade. The eyes of the world are upon you and the hopes and
prayers of all liberty loving peoples go with you.
"In company with our brave allies and broth rs in arms on other fronts you will bring about the
destruction of the German war machine, elimination of Nazi tryranny over the oppressed peoples of

General 'Ike 'Is Supreme
A tiled Ghiefforlnvasion
By the Associated Press. Genm. Dwight David Eisenhower, now
leading the Allied forces in the long-awaited invasion of Hitler's Europe,
is a soldier of long standing, although a soldier of second choice.
Welding the Allied armies, air arms and navies into one striking
force has been the task of Gen. Eisenhower and the result of his work
is now bombarding French coastal towns, sending troops parachuting
--- - ---~--to the continent in the drive for "aj

Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world..
"Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well
well equipped and battle hardened. He will fight savagely.
this year of 1944 much has happened since the Nazi triumphs
and 1941.

trained,r
But in
of 1940

.

_r

10 A.M. Whistle
TodayTo Mark
cl r e ar
Solemn1 Prayer
Air raid sirens, the University
whistle, the carillon tower and church
bells will formally announce the in-
vasion in Ann Arbor at 10 a.m. today
according to an order received from
Governor Harry F. Kelly, a Police
Department spokesman said early this
morning.
Signals will be used for a period of
90 seconds. This is to be followed
by a cessation of all activities for a
period of one minute, which will be
given over to prayer and reflection.
In line with a recent proclamation
of Gov. Kelly, the Michigan Office of'
Civilian Defense with the cooperation
of the University, churches and city,
officials has devised a plan for sim-
ultaneous state-wide observance of
D-Day.

' "As supreme commander of the
Allied Expeditionary Force, there is
imposed on me the duty and respon-
sibility of taking all measures neces-
sary to the prosecution of the war.
Prompt and willing obedience to the
orders that I shall issue is essential.
Effective civil administration of
France must be provided by French-
mern. All persons must continue in
their present duties unless otherwise
instructed. Those who have common
cause with the enemy and so betrayed
their country will be removed.
As France is liberated from her
oppressors, you yourselves will
choose your representatives, and
the government under which you
wish to live.
(Continued on Page 2)
The programs will also include scrip-
ture readings by two servicemen and
hymns.
Purpose of D-ay programs is to
retain control over invasion observ-

LONDON-Prime Minister Churchill told Parliament that the
American-British Allies are sustained by about 11,000 first line aircraft,
which can be drawn upon as needed.
"So far," he said, "the commanders who are engaged report that
everything is proceeding according to plan."
t And what a plan!" he declared.
Churchill said the vast operation was "undoubtedly te most compli-
cated and difficult which has ever occurred."
* * * * * *
ALLIED H E ADQU ART ERS, N APLES, JUNE 6-(AP)-The
battle to destroy the German enemy in Italy t'continues without pause"
and troops of the Fifth Army have advanced some five miles beyond the
Tiber, Allied Headquarters announced today.

complete and full victory."
lIe led the Allied force which in
a single year snatched North
Africa from the Axis, exterminated
Marshal Erwin Rommel's once
dreaded Africa Corps, conquered
Sicily and squeezed Italy out of
the war, reopened the Mediterran-
ean to United Nations' shipping
and dealt the German Luftwaffle
a smashing defeat.
The cooperationand coordination
which has characterized the Allied
history of this war are attributed to
the fine work of Gen. Eisenhower,
who, being over the age limit of 20,
failed to receive an appointment to
Annapolis and therefore launched his
military career at the U. S. Military
Academy instead.
Always ready to accept all respon-
sibility for his actions, Eisenhower
has managed perfect discipline but
has at the same time endeared him-
self to his subordinates.
Gen. Eisenhower has constantly
lauded the men fighting under him
and has had a strong belief in the
infantry, paying tribute to the
"footslogger" at all points.
Born in Denison, Texas, Eis-
enhower is the descendant of a
family which left Germany in the

'

* * *

* * *

S UPREME HEADQUAR TERS, A LLIED EXPEDI'FIONA R Y
FORCE, JUNE 6-(AP)-Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the Supreme
Allied commander, went on the air this invasion day, telling the peoples
of Europe the grand assault on the continent had begun and MAll
patriots, young and old, will have a part to pay in the liberation."
He pleaded against premature uprisings, saying, fBe patient, pre-
pare. Wait until I give you the signal."
. * .*
NEW YORK, June 6-(AP)--The Berlin radio, in a broadcast
recorded by NBC, said this morning that strong Allied air attacks have
been launched on the Dieppe area.
2. x ' *

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