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May 21, 1944 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-05-21

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PAGE TWO

rVi"H MIChIIGA N DAIL

SUNDAY, MAY 21, 1944

RAPID PROGRESS:
Prof. Rufus Discusses Chinese
Achievements in Education

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION:

Increased Enrollment Predicted

Editor's Note: Three films on con-
tenporay China will be shown Satur-
day at the Rackham Auditorium. In
anticipation of this, a series of articles
representing the opinions of a number
of people, who are especially interested
in China, is appearing in The Daily.
The second of the series, which appears
below, is by Prof. W. Carl Rufus of the
astronomy department as told to The
Daily.
During our last trip to China in
1936 we visited a large number of
colleges and universities, national,
provincial and private. We discussed
educational policies with many lead-
ers in that field including the min-
ister of education, Dr. S. C. Wang.
Ten years had elapsed since a for-
mer visit, and we marvelled at the
achievements. We are convinced
that the Chinese made more rapid
and. more substantial progress in the
development of institutions of high-
er learning during the decade pre-
ceding the invasion by Japan in 1937
than any race during a similar pe-
riod in the history of education.
On illustration must here suffice-
the rapid growth of Sun Yat-Sen
University at Canton. It has the
niost extensive university campus in
the world. Chancellor Chou Lou
showed us the building program,
which was about two-thirds com-
pleted, with commodious quarters for
the various colleges from science and
engineering to forestry and agricul-
ture. He personally accompanied us
to the College of Science and intro-
duced us to the Dean. We were im-

pressed by the completeness of the
organization, the extent of the curric-
ulum and the variety of equipment
for instruction and demonstration.
We also visited two of the ten units
of Academia Sinica, physics in
Shanghai and astronomy on Purple1
Mountain near Nanking. These are
government research institutions
which are contributing their full .sh are~
by attacking modern scientific prob-
lems.
Plans were being made to move
their institutions to the interior on
account of the impending war. Books
and equipment had already been re-
moved from some libraries and lab-
oratories for the long trek. Higher,
education is now carrying on with
great zeal and enthusiasm in spite!
of bombings and casualties. Letters
have come to me from Chinese uni-
versity professors whose letterheads
bore the inscription, "Cave No. -."
Would Michigan professors carry on
under those conditions?
Grentzer Elected Secretary
Of State Vocal' Group
Miss Rose Marie Grentzer, mem-
ber of the School of Music faculty,
Was recently elected'secretary of the
Michigan State Vocal Association at
the recent All State Music Festival'
held at Michigan State College at
East Lansing.
Ths Association is a professionalj
organization of teachers of vocal mu-I
sic in the State of Michigan.

Enrollment in the summer session
of the School of Education is expect-1
ed to be far above that of last year,
due to the growing conviction that
there are new problems in education
calling for intensive sruy, accord-
ing to Dean J. B. Edmonson of the;
School of Education.
Because of the keen competition
for positions in years to come, those
who have kept up with changing edu-
cation needs will be more in de-
mand, Dean Edmonson said. That is
where the summer sessions will play
their leading role, for those who at-
tend will become acquainted with
the new methods, he added.
Summer Plan
Plans made for the summer which
have been announced are the four
week* Intersession opening Monday
June 5, a block of six' week courses
beginning Monday, July 3, and a
block of eight week courses starting
the same day.
Four workshops are being ar-
ranged, all under the direction of
Prof. Harlan C. Koch. The Work-
shop in the Secondary School Curri-
culum will be under the direction of
Prof. Edgar G. Johnston. The Work-
shop in Elementary Education will
be supervised by Prof. Willard C.
Olson. Prof. Koch will lead the
Workshop im Guidance and Counsel-
.ing, and Prof. Mabel E. Rugen will
head the Worshop in Health Educa-
tion.
Physical Education Program
At the University Fresh Air Camp,
which is near Pinckney, twenty miles
north of Ann Arbor, a workshop pro-
gram dealing with the problems of
young boys is being planned.
A program for undergraduates in
,the field of physical education is be-
ing arranged by the School of Edu-
MQ/I E
PR EV IF %. .

cation in cooperation with the Na-
tional Music Camp under the direc-
tion of Dr. Laurie Campbell.
A study-work program designed
for persons interested in the work of
school counselors will be built around
some of the training facilities of the
Ford Company, the Chrysler Corpor-
ation and selected retail stores in
Detroit.
Prof. Koch To Teach
Prof. Koch will represent the
School on a committee of represen-
tatives from other Michigan insti-
tutions involved in the program.
General responsibility for the in-
structional program will be in the
hands of Dr. Francis W. Dalton of
the University High School.
Dr. Marie Skodak of the Flint

Guidance Center and Prof. Koch will
be responsible for special courses
during the Intersession for postwar
counselors and visiting teachers.
They will be assisted by representa-
tives of various local and state agen-
cies. Dr. Boyd H. Bode, of Ohio
State University, will offer the
course in the philosophy of education
in the Intersession.
A series of courses leading to the
master's degree have been arranged
to meet the needs of those who are
I engaged in the work of teacher-li-
brarian. The sequence will provide
a combination of courses in library
science and education.
The Fourteenth Annual Summer
Education Conference wil be held
during the week of July 24 to 28.

I

BRITISH DISPLAY MIDGET SUBMARINE-A British "Midget Sub-
marine" proceeds at great speed during a recent demonstration.
Carrying a crew of three or four men, the "midget" is between 30 and
35 feet long, has no conning tower, and can submerge only to ten or 12,
feet below the surface. -AP Wirephoto.
JAPAN WON'T CRACK:
Pearl arbor Veteran Says
Complete Destruction OnlyWay

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"It is only wishful thinking to plan
on Japan's cracking. We can beat
the Japanese only by destroying
their men and their resources," Capt.
Paul F. Busch, AUS, who was in Ja-
pan at the time of Pearl Harbor and
was interned there for a short while
afterwards. told the May class of Co.
A 3651st S. U. at their graduation
exercises yesterday in the Lydia

NOW PLAYING

Mendelssohn Theatre.
Capt. Rusch said that the
mans cracked in 1918 and that
is every reason to believe that
will crack again, but that the
anese philosophy is different
that of the Germans. "Japan
be crushed," he said.

Ger-
there
they
Jap-
from
must

Jars Have Lost Initiative
"It is clear that the Japanese have
now lost the initiative. But the war
is by no means won. At the begin-
ning of the war the Japanese rea-
lized that we would try to beat Ger-
many first. Their chief ally at that
time was our underestimation of
Japan's resources and determina-
tion", he stated.
Capt. Rusch added that the Ja-
panese soldiers are the toughest
fighting men a.live. They can live on
a handful of rice and a small amount
of fish a day and think nothing of
marching 30 miles in 24 hours.
"The job will not be easy, but we
are much better off now than we
were when the war first started.
Our operations have increased in
scope and power and Japan can be
beaten only by force and power," he
continued.
Other Speakers
Other speakers of the program
were Capt. George G. Spence, AUS,
commanding officer of the company,
Col. Frederick C. Rogers, Inf., com-
manding officer of the 3651st S. U.,
Dr. Joseph K. Yamagiwa, a member
of the University faculty. and Cpl.
Robert J. C. Butow, top ranking
graduate.
Cpl. J. Arthur Flynn, a member
of the graduating class, sang "Ol'

Man River" by Jerome Kern and
"For You Alone" by Henry E. Geehl.
He was accompanied by Cpl. Elia M.
Figundio.
Rabbi Jehudah H. Cohen, director
of Hillel foundation, gave the invo-
cation, and Rev. Chester H. Loucks,
chaplin of Co. A. gave the benedic-
-ion.
The men in the graduating class
completed a year of intensive study
at the University. They left Ann
Arbor yesterday for a ten day fur-
lough. When they return, they will
be sent to Alabama for field train-
ing and then will be given officer
candidate training.
Miss Oulbegian
Will Present
lPiano eclital
A piano recital will be presented
by Miss Violet Oulbegian, Grad, a
student of piano under John Kollen,
at 8:30 p. m. today in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
There wil be no program at the
International Center, where Miss
Oulbegian has served as Social di-
rector, today, and Dr. Esson M. Gale,
director of the Center, said that
those who would regularly go to the
Center are urged to attend the re-
cital.
Miss Oulbegian was the recipient
of the Albert A. Stanley Medal and
the scholarship of the Chamber Mu-
sic Society of Ann Arbor this year
for her outstanding work in music.
She is a member of Mu Phi Epsilon
and a graduate instructor in the
theary department of the School of
Music. She is now working for her
M. M. Degree which she will receive
in June.
The program for the recital will
consist of theSonata in D major by
Mozart; Jeux d'Eau by Ravel; Fan-
taisie in minor by Chopin; and two
selections and Fugue on a theme by
Handel.
The recital is open to the public.
Living Costs Rise
NEW YORK. May 20.-(P)-Living
costs rose last month in 57 of the 63
cities surveyed regularly by the Na-
tional Industrial Conference Board,
it reported today.

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The valiant contribution of those
Frenchmen who fight-not bow to-
fascism and the story of a small
group of men who risked their lives
to join that fight is the exciting
background for "Passage to Mar-
seille," which opens today at the
Michigan Theatre.
Starring Humphrey Bogart the
picture tells the story of an anti
Nazi French journalist's daring es-
cape from Devil's Island with four
other convicts and of the perils they
encounter in their attempt to get
back to France. The capitulation of
France while they are still en route
provides an added compilation.
___MRRILYN SHOPPE

tu tax

UC he £Larry)
On State at the Head of North University
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